Date   

Re: Decal backing color question

Bruce Smith
 

Jim,

Stuggling as I am today with 2" white numbers for some new military freight car loads, I feel the pain. One way to deal with this is to color the backing with a dark marker. I have done that and it helps, but I forgot to today!

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith

________________________________________
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [STMFC@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of jim_mischke [jmischke@att.net]
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2013 2:35 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Decal backing color question

I've always noticed that decal backing from most manufacturers is light colored. Light blue, pink, or off white. These can be a real pain with white decals, especially the smaller graphics for repack and reweigh data, and finding the right date for a model.

Is there any reason for this? Can decals be rendered on darker colored backing?






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


Re: Decal backing color question

jerryglow2
 

But it does seem to effect how easily the decal slides off the backing

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "James F. Brewer" <jfbrewer@...> wrote:



A few years ago I believe it was Ben Hom who suggested rubbing a black Sharpie pen on the back of the decal paper ; I've done this and it does help to read the decal lettering.



Jim Brewer

Glenwood MD



----- Original Message -----


From: RUTLANDRS@...
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, March 8, 2013 3:38:42 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Decal backing color question

 




It is hard to read them on the paper, however, I use a black bowl to float
off my white decals and a tan bowl for the black. Works or me.
Chuck Hladik


In a message dated 3/8/2013 3:35:49 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
jmischke@... writes:

I've always noticed that decal backing from most manufacturers is light
colored. Light blue, pink, or off white. These can be a real pain with white
decals, especially the smaller graphics for repack and reweigh data, and
finding the right date for a model.

Is there any reason for this? Can decals be rendered on darker colored
backing?

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






Re: Decal backing color question

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

A few years ago I believe it was Ben Hom who suggested rubbing a black Sharpie pen on the back of the decal paper ; I've done this and it does help to read the decal lettering.



Jim Brewer

Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----


From: RUTLANDRS@aol.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, March 8, 2013 3:38:42 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Decal backing color question

 




It is hard to read them on the paper, however, I use a black bowl to float
off my white decals and a tan bowl for the black. Works or me.
Chuck Hladik


In a message dated 3/8/2013 3:35:49 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
jmischke@att.net writes:

I've always noticed that decal backing from most manufacturers is light
colored. Light blue, pink, or off white. These can be a real pain with white
decals, especially the smaller graphics for repack and reweigh data, and
finding the right date for a model.

Is there any reason for this? Can decals be rendered on darker colored
backing?


Re: Hutchins aftermarket roof for USRA single shealth boxcars

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "jim_mischke" <jmischke@...> wrote:



I understand that the USRA single sheath boxcars were built with Murphy XLa roofs (like Tichy model). Many railroads fitted theirs later with Hutchins dry good roofs (like Westerfield and Accurail).

A major difference is that one had 14 panels, the other 17.

Is there a published drawing available of the Hutchins replacement roof?
Just about any Car Builder's Cyclopedia from the twenties and thirties will have something on the Hutchins Dry Lading roof, although not a drawing of the whole roof. You also need to be careful if picking up the Hutchins name from railroad equipment diagrams; Hutchins also made a replacement "outside metal roof" for USRA cars that looks just like the Murphy XLA, it's shown in Fig. 737 of the 1922 CBC.

One interesting thing I notices from the ads Gene posted is some of the Hutchins "Universal" roofs lack the distinctive dimple in the curved end of the seam caps, which makes them look just like the competing Chicago-Cleveland products. Now I know why Bill Welch is coming up with references to Hutchins roofs on FGE cars that don't look like they have hutchins roofs.

Dennis


Hutchins aftermarket roof for USRA single shealth boxcars

Jim Mischke
 

I understand that the USRA single sheath boxcars were built with Murphy XLa roofs (like Tichy model). Many railroads fitted theirs later with Hutchins dry good roofs (like Westerfield and Accurail).

A major difference is that one had 14 panels, the other 17.

Is there a published drawing available of the Hutchins replacement roof?


Re: Decal backing color question

Charles Hladik
 

It is hard to read them on the paper, however, I use a black bowl to float
off my white decals and a tan bowl for the black. Works or me.
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 3/8/2013 3:35:49 P.M. Eastern Standard Time,
jmischke@att.net writes:






I've always noticed that decal backing from most manufacturers is light
colored. Light blue, pink, or off white. These can be a real pain with white
decals, especially the smaller graphics for repack and reweigh data, and
finding the right date for a model.

Is there any reason for this? Can decals be rendered on darker colored
backing?


Decal backing color question

Jim Mischke
 

I've always noticed that decal backing from most manufacturers is light colored. Light blue, pink, or off white. These can be a real pain with white decals, especially the smaller graphics for repack and reweigh data, and finding the right date for a model.

Is there any reason for this? Can decals be rendered on darker colored backing?


Re: Delaware and Hudson cement boxcar

Jim Mischke
 

I am building on the B&O Modeler article information.

Understandably, the article does not reconcile the oval roof hatches, side round hatches, or no hatch configurations seen in photos. And whose hopper doors, Wine or Enterprise? Such information has not surfaced. I would speculate that the the hopper doors would be the same as the class N-31 and N-34 wagontop covered hoppers.

We know of three uses. (1) Originally used by Vang Construction to haul cement from a plant in Pittsburgh to build nearby Allegheny River Lock and Dam #2 during 1933-1936, 40 cars, class M-24a. (2) In 1940, eight of these M-24a cars were reassigned to haul sand between a quarry on the AC&Y and a Dupont plant in Cleveland. (3) Also in 1940, 18 were converted to M-24b for zinc sinter service between Dupont plants in New Castle, Pa. and one in West Virginia. Both Dupont services seem to have lasted until about 1958. Several cars went into company service, unknown task.

However, the B&O photographs do not directly corrulate between the three configurations and the three uses.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Pieter_Roos" <pieter_roos@...> wrote:


Hello Jim;

Actually, the article by Greg Smith in Vol 2, No.1 of the B&O Modeler on the M24 cement cars contains more information than I have seen in the articles and photos of the D&H cars. In particular, the MM article and Tichy kit that apparently derived from it assumed that the cars retained the as-built Murphy XLa roof. Yet D&H converted many of their USRA boxcars to use solid metal roofs (Viking, Hutchins or Murphy rectangular panel). Does it make sense that they made such a change on general service boxcars but left the original roof on bulk cement cars?

Pieter Roos
Connecticut.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "jim_mischke" <jmischke@> wrote:



Found a little more information.

citation: "Box Cars become Gravity-Unloading Bulk Cement Carriers", Concrete - Cement mill Section, feb. 1935, pages 35-37.

A light treatment. D&H had 30 such cars. Serving plants at Howe's Cave and Glenns Falls, NY. Photo of hopper doors shows them very close to doorway.

No mention of B&O converted boxcars.






--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "jim_mischke" <jmischke@> wrote:



I am very curious about the D&H cement boxcar, a modified USRA single sheathed boxcar, the familiar HO model manufactured by Tichy.

B&O had similar cars, classes M-24a and M-24b, modified in 1933, 287000-287039 series. They were first used to haul cement for new locks on the Allegheny River, later zinc sinters and sand for Dupont. They lasted in hopper form until 1958 or so.

Our B&O photos and information are sparce or conflicting. Perhaps some research into the D&H experience might help. Certainly neither B&O nor D&H invented hopper doors or hatches for their cement car programs, they bought from vendors. Maybe the same vendors.

Can anyone point me to a D&H diagram book or diagram for this D&H car? An emailed attachment would be welcome, pdf or jpg format would work.

Please contact me in advance. Thank you in advance.


Jim Mischke
B&OHS


Re: Advertising Photos of Freight Car Roofs

Bill Welch
 

I remember once standing in a Jetway waiting to board the plane and spotting a small builders plate with Stanray on the edge of the end where the jetway met the side of the airplane. I said to myself "I know who they are."

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "sartherdj@..." <sartherdj@...> wrote:


Stanray was a large corporation that bought up many other businesses in the early 1960's. I worked at one such company, John Gillen & Company, in Cicero during summers of 1962 and 1963. Stanray also owned a company that manufactured boats (the name escapes me now) as well as Standard Railway Equipment Company. Eventually, Stanray spun off many of their subsidiaries to Pepsico and later IC Industries if I recall the merger, acquisition and sales history of the Gillen Company correctly.

Later, Dave Sarther Tucson, AZ


-----Original Message-----
From: Misc Clark <clark.cone4@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Fri, Mar 8, 2013 10:39 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Advertising Photos of Freight Car Roofs


Gene, thanks for the info...Is a "Stanray" roof a Standard Railway
Equipment Co moniker?
TIA, Clark Cone

On Thu, Mar 7, 2013 at 11:55 PM, Gene <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

**


Hi Folks,
As Dan has discovered, I posted a number of ads and a couple of magazine
articles for freight car roofs in an album in the photo section entitled
"Roofs, freight car." I have posted only those with either a photo or a
drawing and will add to it as new items become available. This replaces and
earlier, smaller group of ads in the Files section.
Gene Green


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "potomacyard" <dlsweeney@> wrote:

Gene Green, thanks for posting to Photos section Great stuff, especially
the Hutchins.
Dan Sweeney, Jr.
Alexandria, VA


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


For Sale

bill davis <billcheri72@...>
 

Sorry I didn't know that.
Any reply please contact me off list
At billcheri72@yahoo.com
Thanks
BILL




________________________________
From: Mike Brock <brockm@cfl.rr.com>
To: bill davis <billcheri72@yahoo.com>
Sent: Friday, March 8, 2013 7:51 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] For Sale



Bill,
Your message of 3/8 is in violation of several STMFC
rules:
 
"Announcements of steam era frt car related items for sell are permitted
BUT
actual
lists of items should be made available from the seller upon
request rather
than in the message."
 
You have listed the items directly on the STMFC.
 
"Seller
messages MUST include OFF GROUP addresses
for replies. Replies by members to
seller messages MUST be OFF GROUP."
 
Any responses to your message on the group itself will result
in jail terms. While your message is in violation of the selling rules you need
to make an additional message indicating that responses must be off group and
you should include an off group address.
 
Mike Brock
STMFC Owner

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Advertising Photos of Freight Car Roofs

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Clark Cone wrote:
Gene, thanks for the info...Is a "Stanray" roof a Standard Railway Equipment Co moniker?
Yes, but it did not become so until AFTER the subject years of this list. I maintain that referring to steam-era freight car roofs as "Stanray" is an anachronism.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


ExactRail Announces All-New Release of B&O M-53 Wagontop Box Car!

Blaine
 

ExactRail Announces the All-New Release of the HO Scale B&O M-53 Wagontop Box Car!

The Baltimore and Ohio M-53 Wagontop Box Car is a true signature classic! In an era when the major design elements of the 40' box car seem to have been well standardized, the Baltimore and Ohio employed an innovative design in which the roof and sides were constructed from single panels of cooper-bearing steel. The quality of this steel and the seamless roof design protected lading from roof leaks and made these cars battleships on the rails. Some of these cars remained on the rails up to the early eighties.

Along with all-new road numbers of popular paint schemes, ExactRail also introduces the B&O M-53 Wagon Top Box Car in the all-new Post War, Linking Great States paint scheme!

"Early 13 Great States' poaint scheme
'Wartime Kuhler' paint scheme
'Olive Coach Green' paint scheme
'Bando Blue' paint scheme
'Post War, Linking Great States' paint scheme

Also available, B&O's 1937 "As Delivered' paint scheme!

ExactRail's M-53 Wagontop Box Car has been designed, engineered and tooled in the U.S. Our unique approach to precision micro-tooling distinguishes the M-53 in the numerous fine scale details. Additionally, ExactRail's M-53 Wagontop Box Car is offered with extraordinarily accurate paint and lettering schemes. In the development of this project, we enlisted the insight of the foremost experts and historians on Baltimore and Ohio's equipment. Their input represents years of meticulous research, the results of which are yours to enjoy!

Please visit ExactRail.com for more information and to view our gallery of photos!

Best regards,

Blaine Hadfield

Vice President, Product
ExactRail


Re: Advertising Photos of Freight Car Roofs

Dave Sarther
 

As a follow up to my last posting about Stanray, the job at John Gillen had two benefits. First, and most obvious, was the paycheck. But second was the daily parade of Zephyrs, CB&Q commuters, the NP North Coast Limited, the Great Northern Empire Builder and countless freights that moved along the triple track "runway" of the CB&Q and the slam bang of the hump yard at Cicero. All right outside the window at my work station.

Later, Dave Sarther Tucson, AZ

-----Original Message-----
From: sartherdj <sartherdj@aol.com>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Fri, Mar 8, 2013 11:07 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Advertising Photos of Freight Car Roofs






Stanray was a large corporation that bought up many other businesses in the early 1960's. I worked at one such company, John Gillen & Company, in Cicero during summers of 1962 and 1963. Stanray also owned a company that manufactured boats (the name escapes me now) as well as Standard Railway Equipment Company. Eventually, Stanray spun off many of their subsidiaries to Pepsico and later IC Industries if I recall the merger, acquisition and sales history of the Gillen Company correctly.

Later, Dave Sarther Tucson, AZ

-----Original Message-----
From: Misc Clark <clark.cone4@gmail.com>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Fri, Mar 8, 2013 10:39 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Advertising Photos of Freight Car Roofs

Gene, thanks for the info...Is a "Stanray" roof a Standard Railway
Equipment Co moniker?
TIA, Clark Cone

On Thu, Mar 7, 2013 at 11:55 PM, Gene <bierglaeser@yahoo.com> wrote:

**


Hi Folks,
As Dan has discovered, I posted a number of ads and a couple of magazine
articles for freight car roofs in an album in the photo section entitled
"Roofs, freight car." I have posted only those with either a photo or a
drawing and will add to it as new items become available. This replaces and
earlier, smaller group of ads in the Files section.
Gene Green


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "potomacyard" <dlsweeney@...> wrote:

Gene Green, thanks for posting to Photos section Great stuff, especially
the Hutchins.
Dan Sweeney, Jr.
Alexandria, VA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Advertising Photos of Freight Car Roofs

Dave Sarther
 

Stanray was a large corporation that bought up many other businesses in the early 1960's. I worked at one such company, John Gillen & Company, in Cicero during summers of 1962 and 1963. Stanray also owned a company that manufactured boats (the name escapes me now) as well as Standard Railway Equipment Company. Eventually, Stanray spun off many of their subsidiaries to Pepsico and later IC Industries if I recall the merger, acquisition and sales history of the Gillen Company correctly.

Later, Dave Sarther Tucson, AZ

-----Original Message-----
From: Misc Clark <clark.cone4@gmail.com>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Fri, Mar 8, 2013 10:39 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Advertising Photos of Freight Car Roofs


Gene, thanks for the info...Is a "Stanray" roof a Standard Railway
Equipment Co moniker?
TIA, Clark Cone

On Thu, Mar 7, 2013 at 11:55 PM, Gene <bierglaeser@yahoo.com> wrote:

**


Hi Folks,
As Dan has discovered, I posted a number of ads and a couple of magazine
articles for freight car roofs in an album in the photo section entitled
"Roofs, freight car." I have posted only those with either a photo or a
drawing and will add to it as new items become available. This replaces and
earlier, smaller group of ads in the Files section.
Gene Green


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "potomacyard" <dlsweeney@...> wrote:

Gene Green, thanks for posting to Photos section Great stuff, especially
the Hutchins.
Dan Sweeney, Jr.
Alexandria, VA






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Volume 26

Bill Vaughn
 

I will give you some money and have you order mine too.

Bill


________________________________
From: Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@sbcglobal.net>
To: STMFC Discussion Group <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 8, 2013 9:00 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Volume 26

STMFC Members,
The RP CYC Publishing Company is pleased to announce the imminent
release of RAILWAY PROTOTYPE CYCLOPEDIA, Volume 26, scheduled for
distribution beginning in the last week of March 2013. Volume 26
contains 113 pages comprising three in-depth articles on the following
subjects:

Early Lightweight House Cars. Part of the continuing series covering
American box car and refrigerator car designs, the 50-page article by
Pat Wider describes the lightweight aluminum and Unicel house car
designs built during the 1940s to early 1950s. This includes box cars
for 10 American and Canadian railroads (ACL, Alton, C&O, CN, CP, GN,
M&StL, NKP, RI, RS) and refrigerator cars for FGEX, IC, and PFE. The
article includes 44 photos, 8 diagrams, and 2 tables.

Pennsylvania Railroad X29 Rebuilds. Continuing the series on American
rebuilt box cars, the 35-page article by Pat Wider describes the 10,000
PRR X29B, X29D, X29E, X29F, and X29G rebuilds of 1951 to 1959. The
article includes 32 photos, 16 diagrams, and 1 table.

ACF Proprietary-End 40’-6” 50-Ton Box Cars. The 28-page article by Ed
Hawkins describes the 2,550 box cars built by ACF from 1948 to 1950
with ACF-design Corrugated Steel Ends. Three variations of these ends
were applied to box cars built for 5 railroads (C&EI, DT&I, M-K-T, RDG,
and WLE). They came with various door openings, side construction
options, and four different types of roofs. The article includes 27
photos, 21 diagrams, and 3 tables.

We appreciate your support and extend to you a pre-publication offer
for Volume 26. The normal retail price for Volume 26 is $29.95.
However, your cost is only $25.00* (postpaid in the U.S.). However,
your payment must be postmarked by Saturday, March 23, 2013 for this
offer to be valid.

To take advantage of this one-time, pre-publication offer for RP CYC
Volume 26, please send a check or money order in the amount of $25.00*
by March 23, 2013 to:

RP CYC Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 451
Chesterfield, MO 63006-0451

*Missouri residents must add $2.00 state & local sales tax ($27.00
total amount). Residents of Canada add $7.00, and residents of other
countries add $14.80 for airmail postage.

To download a flyer: http://www.rpcycpub.com/v26flyer.pdf

Thank you!
Pat Wider & Ed Hawkins

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


NP 1958 cuft 2 bay covered hoppers- Intermountain

Andy Carlson
 

Hi,


For Sale:
I have 6 brand new, never been opened, Intermountain HO Northern Pacific gray
1958 cubic foot 2 bay covered hoppers with the 2 triangular openings on the
side. Built 8-1940 in black lettering with fully spelled out "NORTHERN PACIFIC".
Square hatches. Nice photo on the Intermountain web site. Intermountain
#48635-(7-12). I have 6 different NP numbers.

List price is $35.00 each. My price is $27.00/each, plus $2.95 shipping/car.
Shipping by weight if more than two cars.

I accept checks and money orders. For a small fee, I can also accept PayPal.

If interested, please contact me off-list @ <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Advertising Photos of Freight Car Roofs

Misc Clark
 

Gene, thanks for the info...Is a "Stanray" roof a Standard Railway
Equipment Co moniker?
TIA, Clark Cone

On Thu, Mar 7, 2013 at 11:55 PM, Gene <bierglaeser@yahoo.com> wrote:

**


Hi Folks,
As Dan has discovered, I posted a number of ads and a couple of magazine
articles for freight car roofs in an album in the photo section entitled
"Roofs, freight car." I have posted only those with either a photo or a
drawing and will add to it as new items become available. This replaces and
earlier, smaller group of ads in the Files section.
Gene Green


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "potomacyard" <dlsweeney@...> wrote:

Gene Green, thanks for posting to Photos section Great stuff, especially
the Hutchins.
Dan Sweeney, Jr.
Alexandria, VA


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Model Shapeways UTLX underframe

thmsdmpsy
 

If they irritate you now Bruce, wait 'til you've painted it.  Tom Dempsey, Spokane, WA




________________________________
From: Bruce F. Smith <smithbf@auburn.edu>
To: "STMFC@yahoogroups.com" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, March 8, 2013 5:49 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Model Shapeways UTLX underframe


 
Steve,

My plan for the couplers is as follows.

Trim the end off of a #58 or similar coupler (should even work with a Sergent) by cutting parallel to the shaft, through the hole. This will get the longest shaft possible. Dress it with a file to make it smooth. locate it in the draft gear and mark for a hole. Drill said hole, probably for a 00-90 or 00-80 screw, and apply an appropriate screw. The hardest part is drilling through the shaft which is pretty hard metal.

Yes, this will result in a coupler w/o a centering spring. As Richard noted in his article, and I mentioned earlier, this seems like no big deal, since the short length of the car and the narrow draft gear box means that the coupler should be OK basically centered.

BTW, you can use the same approach to mount a coupler in the front pilot of a brass loco that came with a dummy if you want a functional coupler.

Oh, I grit blasted my underframe the other day (note the wax was already cleaned off) and it did seem to remove some of the "texture", but there are still those annoying lines from the imprecision in the build of vertical surfaces on the sides of the underframe.

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [STMFC@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Steve and Barb Hile [shile@mindspring.com]
Sent: Friday, March 08, 2013 12:18 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Model Shapeways UTLX underframe

My underframe arrived this week. It is interesting to think about how it
was created.

Has anyone figured out how to mount a coupler in the draft gear? It won't
fit a Kadee or an Accumate.

Steve Hile

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Railway Prototype Cyclopedia Volume 26

Ed Hawkins
 

STMFC Members,
The RP CYC Publishing Company is pleased to announce the imminent
release of RAILWAY PROTOTYPE CYCLOPEDIA, Volume 26, scheduled for
distribution beginning in the last week of March 2013. Volume 26
contains 113 pages comprising three in-depth articles on the following
subjects:

Early Lightweight House Cars. Part of the continuing series covering
American box car and refrigerator car designs, the 50-page article by
Pat Wider describes the lightweight aluminum and Unicel house car
designs built during the 1940s to early 1950s. This includes box cars
for 10 American and Canadian railroads (ACL, Alton, C&O, CN, CP, GN,
M&StL, NKP, RI, RS) and refrigerator cars for FGEX, IC, and PFE. The
article includes 44 photos, 8 diagrams, and 2 tables.

Pennsylvania Railroad X29 Rebuilds. Continuing the series on American
rebuilt box cars, the 35-page article by Pat Wider describes the 10,000
PRR X29B, X29D, X29E, X29F, and X29G rebuilds of 1951 to 1959. The
article includes 32 photos, 16 diagrams, and 1 table.

ACF Proprietary-End 40-6 50-Ton Box Cars. The 28-page article by Ed
Hawkins describes the 2,550 box cars built by ACF from 1948 to 1950
with ACF-design Corrugated Steel Ends. Three variations of these ends
were applied to box cars built for 5 railroads (C&EI, DT&I, M-K-T, RDG,
and WLE). They came with various door openings, side construction
options, and four different types of roofs. The article includes 27
photos, 21 diagrams, and 3 tables.

We appreciate your support and extend to you a pre-publication offer
for Volume 26. The normal retail price for Volume 26 is $29.95.
However, your cost is only $25.00* (postpaid in the U.S.). However,
your payment must be postmarked by Saturday, March 23, 2013 for this
offer to be valid.

To take advantage of this one-time, pre-publication offer for RP CYC
Volume 26, please send a check or money order in the amount of $25.00*
by March 23, 2013 to:

RP CYC Publishing Co.
P.O. Box 451
Chesterfield, MO 63006-0451

*Missouri residents must add $2.00 state & local sales tax ($27.00
total amount). Residents of Canada add $7.00, and residents of other
countries add $14.80 for airmail postage.

To download a flyer: http://www.rpcycpub.com/v26flyer.pdf

Thank you!
Pat Wider & Ed Hawkins

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Armour Produce operations Who Owned What

Bill Welch
 

Just wanted to straighten out the record about all the early names of Reefer companies and who owned what. My source is on page 299 of March 1905 issue of "Everybody's Magazine" in the first part of a multi story expose entitled "The Greatest Trust in World" by Charles Edward Russell.

Armour Group had the following names under it: The Armour Refrigerator Line; The Armour Packing Company; Armour & Company; Fruit Growers Express, Kansas City Fruit Express; Continental Fruit Express; Boyd Lyman & Co,; Kansas City Dressed Beef Line; Barbarossa Refrigerator Line; and Tropical Refrigerator Line.

Swift Group included: Swift Refrigerator Line; California Fruit Transportation; Continental Fruit Transportation; and Libby, McNeil & Libby.

Morris Group included these company names: Morris Refrigerator Line; Nelson Morris & Co.; and N.K. Fairbanks.

Hammond Group included: George H. Hammond & Co.; National Car Line; and Anglo-American Refrigerator Line.

I think Tony was confusing the two companies that began "Continental Fruit..." Charles Edward Russell was one of the most prominent investigative reporters of his day that were known as Muckrakers. The series of articles were eventually published as a book with the same title as the articles. Both the articles and the book have been digitized by Google. Use his name, the title of his work, or the magazine's name with the March 1905 date to search. I like the magazine version because there are a few photos plus the other articles are a glimpse into what people were writing about. Undoubtedly to defend himself Ogden Armour wrote and published his book The Packers, the Private Car Lines, and the People" in 1906.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Bill Welch wrote:
Armour was involved in the Produce transport business by 1890, beginning to transport produce from California, but soon the SP, UP and AT&SF developed their own operations and Armour developed other markets with several different company names emblazoned on their cars; Continental Fruit Express, Kansas City Fruit Express and Tropical Refrigerator Express are three I have identified along with FGE.
Well, not exactly. It's true that the second two listed by Bill were certainly absorbed by Armour, along with Earl Fruit Company, the Goodell Line, California Fruit Express, and Fruit Dealers Despatch. All had previously been independent. But Continental Fruit Express was absorbed by Swift.

By May 1898 the Central of Georgia signed an exclusive contract with FGE to transport their perishable loading soon to be followed by the Atlantic Coast Line, Seaboard Air Line, Southern and Florida East Coast Railroad, meaning that the harvests of fruits and vegetables from southeastern Atlantic Coast states were carried in cars of the Armour Lines with little if any exception for the next 22 years.
It's worth noting that the abuses, both of icing charges and freight charges, by the Armour system were an important stimulus to the Hepburn Act of 1906, which made railroads responsible for providing refrigerator cars to shippers (leased, if need be) and for the reasonableness of icing charges. After 1906, a number of railroads ceased to use Armour, as the previously favorable Armour contracts were no longer profitable under the Hepburn Act rules. And E.H. Harriman cancelled his Armour contracts and founded Pacific Fruit Express just as the Hepburn Act went into effect, to provide refrigerator car services to SP and UP. I very much doubt the timing was a coincidence. It's thus interesting that the southeastern roads stuck with Armour. Hopefully Bill's book will provide insight into that.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
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