Date   
covered Hoppers

gary laakso
 

Railway Prototype Cyclopedia, Vol 16 at page 62 reprints an ad from General American Transportation Corp and in the last paragraph it claims leadership in “the new insulated hopper cars from bulk sugar transportation”. The ad is undated but likely run in early 1935. Is it safe to assume that the ad referenced as experimental car and would it have been a covered insulated hopper?

gary laakso
south of Mike Brock




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

NORTHERN PACIFIC 41' FLAT CAR

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

A question that I have been unsuccessfully seeking an answer for a number of years might be
more revalent now. Central Valley has recently released a model of a Northern Pacific 41'
flat car. There is a photo of the model on CV's website. It is finished with a late lettering scheme.
This is as per a photo that Jack Parker was kind enough to share with me some years back. I
believe that earlier in its career this car was lettered with NORTHERN PACIFIC spelled out and
with Andrews trucks. I would like to find a photographic evidence of this so that i can properly
letter my car with the correct data placement.

Hopefully now that this car is on the market I can finally get an answer.

Bill Pardie

Re: covered Hoppers

John
 

Au contraire.

First of all the size of the car. Two or three bay covered hoppers carry high density products such as cement, kaolin or lime (or in the good old days, carbon black). Four and five bay covered hoppers carry lighter materials such as plastic pellets, grain or flour. The cars carrying powdery or plastic products usually have circular loading hatches and either pneumatic or gravity outlet gates (more often, pneumatic). Grain cars have long loading hatches and have gravity outlets. Rule of thumb if you are modeling - substance that are powdery or blown into the car = circular hatches, grain(which doesn't flow that well) = long trouths. By the same token - substances that are unloaded pneumatically (again, powdery or light weight materials) = obviously, pneumatic outlets. Things that flow into underground hoppers when unloading(wheat, corn) = sliding outlet gates.

Now, what is in what car? If you buy a decorated car, usually RR owned cars (e.g., UPRR)or cars labeled for some agricultural owner (e.g., Wagner Mills, ADM, Cargill) are grain (some exceptions), if labeled for something like Dow, or duPont, probably plastic (although duPont also made titanium dioxide for paint & paper making - which is a high density powder material). I think most GATX, UTLX and other leased cars are used for plastic pellets, but some may be used for grain. If it is labeled Lone Star or CEMEX it is for cement.

-- John

--- In STMFC@..., Bill Daniels <billinsf@...> wrote:

Bill,

Dring that era, covered hoppers were not used for grain... In fact that didn't happen until the "Big John" covered hoppers of the Southern in the early 60's. lading like flour wasn't shipped in covered hoppers until the advent of Airslide technology about 10 years after the date of your cars. It was most likely that these cars carried cement.

As for specific hardware, I don't know that any specific hardware could be viewed that would allow you to determine what lading was carried.

Bill Daniels

Sent from my iPad

On Mar 16, 2013, at 1:21 PM, "BillM" <fecbill@...> wrote:

How do you tell (or can you tell) if a covered hopper is used for cement, or grain, or other loading. I am asking concerning physical/mechanical devices on the car such as top hatches and hopper unloading equipment as opposed to lettering, stencils or weathering.

Specifically I have three Kato HO scale 2 bay covered hoppers lettered for Milwaukee Road. The lettering indicates blt date of 1949.

Thank you
Bill Michael


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: covered Hoppers

BillM
 

Bill
Thank you for the information. That helps.
Blessings
Bill

--- In STMFC@..., Bill Daniels <billinsf@...> wrote:

Bill,

Dring that era, covered hoppers were not used for grain... In fact that didn't happen until the "Big John" covered hoppers of the Southern in the early 60's. lading like flour wasn't shipped in covered hoppers until the advent of Airslide technology about 10 years after the date of your cars. It was most likely that these cars carried cement.

As for specific hardware, I don't know that any specific hardware could be viewed that would allow you to determine what lading was carried.

Bill Daniels

Sent from my iPad

On Mar 16, 2013, at 1:21 PM, "BillM" <fecbill@...> wrote:

How do you tell (or can you tell) if a covered hopper is used for cement, or grain, or other loading. I am asking concerning physical/mechanical devices on the car such as top hatches and hopper unloading equipment as opposed to lettering, stencils or weathering.

Specifically I have three Kato HO scale 2 bay covered hoppers lettered for Milwaukee Road. The lettering indicates blt date of 1949.

Thank you
Bill Michael



Re: covered Hoppers

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Bill,

Dring that era, covered hoppers were not used for grain... In fact that didn't happen until the "Big John" covered hoppers of the Southern in the early 60's. lading like flour wasn't shipped in covered hoppers until the advent of Airslide technology about 10 years after the date of your cars. It was most likely that these cars carried cement.

As for specific hardware, I don't know that any specific hardware could be viewed that would allow you to determine what lading was carried.

Bill Daniels
On Mar 16, 2013, at 1:21 PM, "BillM" <fecbill@...> wrote:

How do you tell (or can you tell) if a covered hopper is used for cement, or grain, or other loading. I am asking concerning physical/mechanical devices on the car such as top hatches and hopper unloading equipment as opposed to lettering, stencils or weathering.

Specifically I have three Kato HO scale 2 bay covered hoppers lettered for Milwaukee Road. The lettering indicates blt date of 1949.

Thank you
Bill Michael


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

covered Hoppers

BillM
 

How do you tell (or can you tell) if a covered hopper is used for cement, or grain, or other loading. I am asking concerning physical/mechanical devices on the car such as top hatches and hopper unloading equipment as opposed to lettering, stencils or weathering.

Specifically I have three Kato HO scale 2 bay covered hoppers lettered for Milwaukee Road. The lettering indicates blt date of 1949.

Thank you
Bill Michael

Re: 1937 UP boxcar #ing help #ing

Dick Harley
 

On Thu Mar 14, 2013 George Courtney asked about lettering an S scale
40-ft double-door steel boxcar as an OSL (UP) car and possibly using
slogan letters for the reporting marks.

FWIW, the SAW slogan is done in 10-inch lettering, and the reporting
marks are done in 9-inch letters.

Maybe more importantly, I don't know of any double-door steel boxcars
lettered for OSL or any other UP subsidiary.
And the B-50-27 is the only class of single-door steel boxcars
lettered for OSL.

Please let me know if I have forgotten something.


Cheers,
Dick Harley
Laguna Beach, CA

Re: Milwaukee Road stock car CMSTP&P. 104637

Douglas Harding
 

Gene I believe that model was built by Robert Leners. Here are Dave Hussy's
photos of that meet. There is no photo of the MILW car, but photos of a
couple other cars he displayed. http://www.pbase.com/dh30973/naperville10
<http://www.pbase.com/dh30973/naperville10&page=all> &page=all



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

Milwaukee Road stock car CMSTP&P. 104637

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

At Naperville in October of 2010 someone displayed a Milwaukee Road stock car lettered "C.M.STP.&P. 104637." I suspect this car was built in O Scale. I would like to contact the builder or owner of this stock car. Please email me at bierglaeser at yahoo dot com.
Gene Green

Re: Rail Movements of Perishables into Boston

RICH CHAPIN
 

Bill,



The NHRRT&HS "Shoreliner", vol 18, #2 has an article on NH carfloat
operations that addresses, I believe, floating of reefers to ships for
off-loading of bananas. Might be something in that of interest.







Rich Chapin

Re: Nashville, TN

Allen Cain <allencain@...>
 

Nashville railroad sites include the Tennessee Central Railway Museum:
http://www.tcry.org/



The old train station is still standing downtown but has been renovated for
other use.



Allen Cain

Re: Rail Movements of Perishables into Boston

Donald B. Valentine
 

--- In STMFC@..., ROGER HINMAN <rhinman11@...> wrote:

Yes Bill, the New Haven went to Boston. In its final corporate configuration it had acquired every rail line south of the city. It had massive freight yards in South Boston which is only a mile or two away from the Produce mkt area you mention. Bob's Photo has some nice shots of reefers being unloaded in South Boston. There was also the Union Freight Railroad which ran along the waterfront connecting the NH and the B&M. Most photos of seen of perishable product on that line was for direct delivery to customers on line. The B&M and Boston & Albany also had facilities near the city center.


Roger Hinman
On Mar 15, 2013, at 4:52 PM, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I have accumulated a nice file of photos of the Produce Mkt. area in Boston, the Faneuil Hall/Quincy Street/Clinton Street area.

I am curious if someone on this list can tell me how deliveries by rail of Perishables would have made it to this area? I am assuming wagons and then trucks. What was the distance? In the aerials I see no obvious railroad connection nearby. My assumption is the NYNH&H would have handled the FGE/WFE/BRE traffic. Did this railroad go in to Boston?

Bill Welch


The B&M never seemed to handle much produce or fruit coming into Boston via rail from the American south or west for reasons which should seem obvious. It did, however, carry a fair amount of meat traffic from the mid-west coming via Canadian Differential Routes.
Not to be overlooked here is the large volume of produce carried by NYC subsidiary Boston & Albany due in large part by the fact that the NYC could control the traffic all the way from Chicago, St. Louis and other such important gateways that the New England roads did not have direct access to. And when the New Boston Market Place, as it was titled, was constructed in the late 1960's it was built on land that I believe had previously been owned by the New Haven not far from South Station bordered by the Southeast Distressway and the loop used by the New Haven for turning entire trains. In those years I could see the produce terminal from my office window and the firm for which I then worked was heavily involved in insurance of it.

Cordially, Don Valentine

Re: Never sweat the decal job......

Jack Mullen
 

--- In STMFC@..., Ray Breyer <rtbsvrr69@...> wrote:

.......because sometimes, there's a prototype for everything.

http://www.collectionscanada.gc.ca/lac-bac/wm.php?img=http://data2.archives.ca/e/e435/e010859856-v8.jpg


Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL
This looks like the sort of photo taken for the claims agent in a personal injury case. It looks like the photographer has gone over the end lettering with chalk so it would be legible in the photo.

Jack Mullen

Re: Rail Movements of Perishables into Boston

ROGER HINMAN <rhinman11@...>
 

I think in his refrigerator car books but he'd better answer that than me

Roger H.

On Mar 15, 2013, at 6:01 PM, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Thank you Roger

I will call Bob. Do you remember how he would have these photos filed?

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., ROGER HINMAN <rhinman11@...> wrote:

Yes Bill, the New Haven went to Boston. In its final corporate configuration it had acquired every rail line south of the city. It had massive freight yards in South Boston which is only a mile or two away from the Produce mkt area you mention. Bob's Photo has some nice shots of reefers being unloaded in South Boston. There was also the Union Freight Railroad which ran along the waterfront connecting the NH and the B&M. Most photos of seen of perishable product on that line was for direct delivery to customers on line. The B&M and Boston & Albany also had facilities near the city center.


Roger Hinman
On Mar 15, 2013, at 4:52 PM, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I have accumulated a nice file of photos of the Produce Mkt. area in Boston, the Faneuil Hall/Quincy Street/Clinton Street area.

I am curious if someone on this list can tell me how deliveries by rail of Perishables would have made it to this area? I am assuming wagons and then trucks. What was the distance? In the aerials I see no obvious railroad connection nearby. My assumption is the NYNH&H would have handled the FGE/WFE/BRE traffic. Did this railroad go in to Boston?

Bill Welch




Re: Rail Movements of Perishables into Boston

Bill Welch
 

Thank you Roger

I will call Bob. Do you remember how he would have these photos filed?

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., ROGER HINMAN <rhinman11@...> wrote:

Yes Bill, the New Haven went to Boston. In its final corporate configuration it had acquired every rail line south of the city. It had massive freight yards in South Boston which is only a mile or two away from the Produce mkt area you mention. Bob's Photo has some nice shots of reefers being unloaded in South Boston. There was also the Union Freight Railroad which ran along the waterfront connecting the NH and the B&M. Most photos of seen of perishable product on that line was for direct delivery to customers on line. The B&M and Boston & Albany also had facilities near the city center.


Roger Hinman
On Mar 15, 2013, at 4:52 PM, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I have accumulated a nice file of photos of the Produce Mkt. area in Boston, the Faneuil Hall/Quincy Street/Clinton Street area.

I am curious if someone on this list can tell me how deliveries by rail of Perishables would have made it to this area? I am assuming wagons and then trucks. What was the distance? In the aerials I see no obvious railroad connection nearby. My assumption is the NYNH&H would have handled the FGE/WFE/BRE traffic. Did this railroad go in to Boston?

Bill Welch



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Rail Movements of Perishables into Boston

ROGER HINMAN <rhinman11@...>
 

Yes Bill, the New Haven went to Boston. In its final corporate configuration it had acquired every rail line south of the city. It had massive freight yards in South Boston which is only a mile or two away from the Produce mkt area you mention. Bob's Photo has some nice shots of reefers being unloaded in South Boston. There was also the Union Freight Railroad which ran along the waterfront connecting the NH and the B&M. Most photos of seen of perishable product on that line was for direct delivery to customers on line. The B&M and Boston & Albany also had facilities near the city center.


Roger Hinman
On Mar 15, 2013, at 4:52 PM, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I have accumulated a nice file of photos of the Produce Mkt. area in Boston, the Faneuil Hall/Quincy Street/Clinton Street area.

I am curious if someone on this list can tell me how deliveries by rail of Perishables would have made it to this area? I am assuming wagons and then trucks. What was the distance? In the aerials I see no obvious railroad connection nearby. My assumption is the NYNH&H would have handled the FGE/WFE/BRE traffic. Did this railroad go in to Boston?

Bill Welch



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Rail Movements of Perishables into Boston

Bill Welch
 

I have accumulated a nice file of photos of the Produce Mkt. area in Boston, the Faneuil Hall/Quincy Street/Clinton Street area.

I am curious if someone on this list can tell me how deliveries by rail of Perishables would have made it to this area? I am assuming wagons and then trucks. What was the distance? In the aerials I see no obvious railroad connection nearby. My assumption is the NYNH&H would have handled the FGE/WFE/BRE traffic. Did this railroad go in to Boston?

Bill Welch

UTL class X Underframe from Model Shapeways

Steve and Barb Hile
 

I have uploaded a couple of photos to a new album on the Model Shapeways UTL
underframe to show how I resolved the issue of mounting a coupler. I found
a pair of MKD #4's in my coupler collection. There is a dimple in the shank
that I used to drill a #50 clearance hole. Then I nipped off the remainder
of the shank and shaped around the hole with a file. Then I drilled a #55
hole through the plate cast (printed?) between the sills that supports the
coupler and up through the top web. This hole was tapped 00-80 and uses the
little screws that come with the Accumate couplers. That seems to work
pretty well, but I might try to fashion a small spacer to put under the
screw head to prevent the other end from sticking up through the underframe.



It is my experience that this material is not as flexible as the resin we
are used to seeing with Sunshine and Westerfield kits. I did break one side
of the sill at the coupler pocket when pressing too hard with the drill.
Although ACC seems to hold the parts back together, it is not a fast grab
that I am used with our kit resin.



Pending moderator approval, I also uploaded a photo of a 1906 tank car (from
the 1906 CBD) that shows the five course tank, like the MDC one. I
purchased some decals from Silver Crash Car Works that should work for the
car, as built. Meaning painted red prior to about 1912. Trucks may be an
issue. I have not found any arch bar trucks with the horizontal top bar.
The model, so far, has MDC arch bar trucks.



Regards,

Steve Hile

Re: Roofless cars

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

Al

The cars in the photo appear to be steel.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
water.kresse@...
Sent: Saturday, 16 March 2013 4:59 a.m.
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Roofless cars

They used roofless box cars with 1/8" steel plate on floors for hauling coke
on C&O.  Al Kresse

Re: Decal Tray was Decal backing color question

bill_d_goat
 

I have had success with the old idea of using a magic marker/Sharpie, etc., to color the back of the decal sheet for white lettering. This makes it easy to see the decal so you can cut it out without cutting into the lettering.
Sometimes a little of the color of the marking pen comes off with the decal so it's best to use the same color marker as the surface you are going to apply the decal to.
I have yet to see an answer (maybe missed it) as to why Champ and later decal makers insisted in using light colored decal paper. Is there a technical reason why dark colored decal paper won't work. Or did Champ once get a huge disouont on pink decal paper?
Bill Williams