Date   
Re: Center Plate Height

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Thanks, Guy, good information.I have a copy of a PFE memo from 1937 that old cars with arch-bar trucks would not be given new cast-steel trucks because of difficulties in finding cast-steel trucks with the center-plate height of these old cars. Evidently PFE was not prepared to add a shimming plate, as Dennis Storzek described, to these cars.

Tony Thompson
Yes Thanks Guy. I figured the eighteen year gap between my references was missing some pieces of the puzzle.

As to retrofitting trucks, when the Soo Line removed the "T" section Bettendorf trucks from several thousand pre WWI boxcars just after WWII, replacing them with Andrews trucks purchased second hand from the CB&Q, the new trucks ended up with the same AC&F fabricated bolsters that had been in the original trucks. In reality, they likely only purchased the sideframes and journal boxes, and moved the bolsters, spring planks, bearings and bearing wedges, and brake gear from the existing trucks.

They later replaced the Andrews sideframes on the remaining cars with ARA one piece cast sideframes, while STILL retaining the original bolsters.

As modelers, we tend to think of a car truck as a unit, but in reality they are a whole collection of sub-assemblies that may be used in different combinations.

Dennis

Re: WIMP?

Charles Hostetler
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Douglas Harding" <doug.harding@...> wrote:

Charles, Armour and other packers used brine tank equipped reefers, which
contained the salt melt, until the tanks could be drained at a facility
equipped to handle the salt ladened ice melt. I know the Decker plant in
Mason City (owned by Armour) pre-cooled their reefers by circulating a
chilled liquid through the brine tanks, then they iced the reefers as they
were being loaded at the loading dock. I assume this enabled faster cooling
and quicker turn around. The Decker plant had an ammonia based ice making
plant on site, which the no doubt used to also chill the liquid they used to
pre-cool.



Doug Harding
Thanks Doug,

If I'm understanding you correctly, it would seem that the Decker plant basically got clean (but warm) RAMs and did everything necessary to cool them down and get them ready to go as they were being loaded. [Side issue - I wonder how they were re-iced along the way. I think of a standard icing dock as servicing a regular RS car, and I wonder whether that facility would have been equipped to deal with a RAM.]

With respect to Wimp, which seems like a smaller facility than Decker, I was wondering if they got an iced/brined car ready to go or whether they had to cool and brine the car at the plant. Andy Laurent and I looked at a waybill that shipped an empty (but iced) NWX RS from Green Bay to the A&W for loading, and this suggested to me that around the packing house districts there might be specialized icing facilities for RAMs that would precool and load the brine tanks before they were spotted for loading.

Regards,

Charles Hostetler

Re: WIMP?

Douglas Harding
 

Charles, Armour and other packers used brine tank equipped reefers, which
contained the salt melt, until the tanks could be drained at a facility
equipped to handle the salt ladened ice melt. I know the Decker plant in
Mason City (owned by Armour) pre-cooled their reefers by circulating a
chilled liquid through the brine tanks, then they iced the reefers as they
were being loaded at the loading dock. I assume this enabled faster cooling
and quicker turn around. The Decker plant had an ammonia based ice making
plant on site, which the no doubt used to also chill the liquid they used to
pre-cool.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

Re: Center Plate Height

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Guy Wilber wrote:
The 26 3/4" center plate height dimension was adopted as "Standard" in 1920 by The ARA. The 26 3/4" dimension was paired with the new built up steel center sill section adopted as "Standard" in 1922 and subsequently used within the ARA's 1923 box car designs.
The 25 3/4" center plate height dimension was adopted as the ARA's "Standard" in 1932 for all cars built with the "Z" section center sill. Though the 1932 ARA box car was the first to feature the newly designed center sill many of the new design were built with the 1922 center sill because the newly rolled sections were not available in large enough quantities to supply the car builders.
"Standard" design dimensions and tolerances for cast steel side frames and bolsters for the 26 3/4" center plate height were adopted in 1928. Those for the 25 3/4" center plate height were adopted in 1932.
Thanks, Guy, good information.I have a copy of a PFE memo from 1937 that old cars with arch-bar trucks would not be given new cast-steel trucks because of difficulties in finding cast-steel trucks with the center-plate height of these old cars. Evidently PFE was not prepared to add a shimming plate, as Dennis Storzek described, to these cars.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: WIMP?

Mike Smeltzer
 

Doing a quick google search I found a reference to a book titled "Directory of the Bureau of Animal Industry" Goverment Printing 1922 on Google books. Shows Wimp Packaging Company located at 1119-1127 West 47th Place Chicago. The reference also indicates that this facility conducts slaughtering.


http://books.google.com/books?id=q4XNAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA56&lpg=PA56&dq=WIMP+Packing+Company&source=bl&ots=trhsFcKeKz&sig=98hsqBUqOew3KugtmS32TBqLeVo&hl=en&sa=X&ei=at-WUauBDsT4yQGd3oCgAw&ved=0CFAQ6AEwBg#v=onepage&q=WIMP%20Packing%20Company&f=false

Mike Smeltzer

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Fri, May 17, 2013 1:49 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] WIMP?






On May 17, 2013, at 11:11 AM, Stephen Bishop <superlab2003@...> wrote:

In the new issue of the New Haven Shoreliner (NHRHTA) there is a photo of a New Haven DEY-3 (S-1) switching a reefer on which is written in large letters"WIMP Packing Company" Can anyone tell me about WIMP? The photo is dated September 28, 1957.

Steve, I doubt that WIMP is still in business, but it was a small family-owned packing house in Chicago that specialized in sausage. The name comes from the family that owned it. Roy Wimp was president and general manager.

Richard Hendrickson

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: WIMP?

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

So it doesn't stand for Weakly Interacting Massive Particle??

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: WIMP?

Charles Hostetler
 

Steve, I doubt that WIMP is still in business, but it was a small family-owned packing house in Chicago that specialized in sausage. The name comes from the family that owned it. Roy Wimp was president and general manager.

Richard Hendrickson

Wimp Packing Co. was in business at least until 1958, and probably until the end of time (at least as it relates to this group). I put together a brief profile including an aerial view of the plant taken in 1952 that those interested can find here:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2013/05/wimp-packing-co.html

They were located just south of the Chicago Stockyards and probably got their raw materials by local truck delivery; but they did ship sausage, bone, and blood by rail. The serving carrier was the IHB but they were located in the Chicago Switching District so the IHB was in general not likely to have been the OLHC.

I noticed on the Sanborn map (which was updated through 1950) that there was a set of brine tanks next to the shipping coolers. I've read a bit about how the fruit packing houses had different ways to bring the heat off fruit - was there an equivalent set of methods for brine reefers? Did protective services for RAMs and RSMs follow procedures similar to those for RS?

Regards,

Charles Hostetler

Re: Center Plate Height

Guy Wilber
 

Dennis wrote:

"That's because standardization came late to truck center plate height. The 1922 CBC shows freight cars trucks with dimensions of 2'-3 1/4" and 2'-2 3/4", none claiming to be a standard. All the trucks built to "AAR dimensions" in the 1940 CBC show 2'-1 3/4". I have not been able to track down when these standard dimensions were adopted, and please note the dimensions for passenger trucks were different. All these are the height when installed under a "light car". Of course, spring deflection under load will lower this, as will wheel wear, which is why the AAR standard for the height of the coupler centerline is a range."


Dennis,

The 26 3/4" center plate height dimension was adopted as "Standard" in 1920 by The ARA. The 26 3/4" dimension was paired with the new built up steel center sill section adopted as "Standard" in 1922 and subsequently used within the ARA's 1923 box car designs.

The 25 3/4" center plate height dimension was adopted as the ARA's "Standard" in 1932 for all cars built with the "Z" section center sill. Though the 1932 ARA box car was the first to feature the newly designed center sill many of the new design were built with the 1922 center sill because the newly rolled sections were not available in large enough quantities to supply the car builders.

"Standard" design dimensions and tolerances for cast steel side frames and bolsters for the 26 3/4" center plate height were adopted in 1928. Those for the 25 3/4" center plate height were adopted in 1932.


Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: some comments on canopy glue

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Hobi Point wrote:
Nice blog post, thanks!
One question: Is Microscale "Kristal Klear" also from the canopy glue family?
Don't know for sure, but I doubt it. I don't see "vinyl acetate polymer" on the label of the bottle I have (someone should check a recent one.)

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: some comments on canopy glue

Hobi Point
 

Nice blog post, thanks!

One question: Is Microscale "Kristal Klear" also from the canopy glue
family?

Re: New Tahoe Truck

Ryan Reed
 

And for those extra-special freight cars that use these sideframes, you can now get machined
wheelsets with prototype-correct front & back profiles and axle profiles.
Has anyone else had trouble with those wheel sets wobbling on the insulated side? Maybe I just got a bad batch.

Ryan Reed

Re: New Tahoe Truck

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O' wrote:
John, no, I had not noticed that, thanks for pointing it out. Major bummer. I can't even think of a truck sideframe I've used that will take a 1.002 axle length. Really makes you wonder doesn't it, like "what were they thinking"?
A number of Atlas trucks have axle lengths like 0,0960. But there is a Reboxx size for these, which is what I use.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: New Tahoe Truck

Tim O'Connor
 

John, no, I had not noticed that, thanks for pointing it out. Major bummer. I can't even think
of a truck sideframe I've used that will take a 1.002 axle length. Really makes you wonder
doesn't it, like "what were they thinking"?

Tim O'

----- Original Message -----
From: "John" <golden1014@...>

Tim,

Have you looked at the axle length of the ER wheelsets? The site advertises they are 1.002. TMW trucks are standardized to use the Intermountain wheelsets, which are in the 1.015 range. That variance would introduce some side-to-side play that I don't think you'd be happy with.

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL

Re: New Tahoe Truck

golden1014
 

Tim,

Have you looked at the axle length of the ER wheelsets? The site advertises they are 1.002. TMW trucks are standardized to use the Intermountain wheelsets, which are in the 1.015 range. That variance would introduce some side-to-side play that I don't think you'd be happy with.

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL

--- In STMFC@..., timboconnor@... wrote:


And for those extra-special freight cars that use these sideframes, you can now get machined
wheelsets with prototype-correct front & back profiles and axle profiles:
https://www.exactrail.com/33-natural-nickel-silver-wheel-sets

I plan to buy some and see how they work with my Tahoe S-2's...

Tim O'

Re: WIMP?

geodyssey <riverob@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On May 17, 2013, at 11:11 AM, Stephen Bishop <superlab2003@...> wrote:

In the new issue of the New Haven Shoreliner (NHRHTA) there is a photo of a New Haven DEY-3 (S-1) switching a reefer on which is written in large letters"WIMP Packing Company" Can anyone tell me about WIMP? The photo is dated September 28, 1957.

Steve, I doubt that WIMP is still in business, but it was a small family-owned packing house in Chicago that specialized in sausage. The name comes from the family that owned it. Roy Wimp was president and general manager.

Richard Hendrickson


Probably mild sausage.

Robert Simpson

Re: New Tahoe Truck

Tim O'Connor
 

And for those extra-special freight cars that use these sideframes, you can now get machined
wheelsets with prototype-correct front & back profiles and axle profiles:
https://www.exactrail.com/33-natural-nickel-silver-wheel-sets

I plan to buy some and see how they work with my Tahoe S-2's...

Tim O'

----- Original Message -----
From: "brian" <brianleppert@...>

Tahoe Model Works has a new HO scale freight car truck. This is the Barber S-2 50-ton truck.

The Barber S-2 truck was developed by the Standard Car Truck Co. Barber S-2 trucks use built-in snubbing devices to provide a smoother ride. These are spring-loaded wedge-shaped friction shoes, located inside pockets cast into the bolster ends. These push out against the side frame columns to dampen vertical spring oscillations. Introduced in 1939, this design is still used today.

Model replicates prototype trucks under a Milwaukee Road rib-side box car at the Western Pacific Railroad Museum in Portola, CA. These trucks have spring planks. Users of S-2 trucks with spring planks include B&O, CofG, IHB, MILW, NYC, P&LE, Reading, SP and UP, and probably others.

Some modelers might find that this truck is a suitable stand-in for spring-plankless S-2 trucks. Advantages over the competition are better defined bolster end detail and proper sized journal boxes.

To see the flyer with photo for this TMW truck, please visit

www.sunshinekits.com/tahoe.html

I would like to express my sincere gratitude to Jim Hayes for including Tahoe Model Works on his web site.

At this time, I am out of semi-scale wheelsets. InterMountain supplies all my wheelsets, and they have been out of 33" semi-scale wheels since January. Hopefully, more will come from China in a couple of months. Filling orders for all 200 series trucks will be delayed, and checks will not be deposited until trucks can be shipped.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

Re: Steampunk Easter Egg

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Ed Sutorik wrote:
Variable density tunnel"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable_Density_Tunnel

Not at all what I was trying to conjure--mine had something to do with hyperspace.
Certainly a "Jules Verne" kind of object!

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

4Sale: Barber S2 50-ton Trucks from TMW

Andy Carlson
 

I have the new Tahoe Barber S2 spring plank truck in stock. Less wheelsets at
$3.50/pair
Shipping of $2.75 in a padded envelope 1st class air mail.

I accept checks and money orders. For a small fee, I can also accept PayPal.

Interested, please contact me off-list, please at <midcentury@...>

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

Re: WIMP?

spsalso
 

Yup. WIMP's would go in varible density tunnels.

Knew it all along.



Ed

Edward Sutorik

Re: Steampunk Easter Egg

spsalso
 

Variable density tunnel"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable_Density_Tunnel

Not at all what I was trying to conjure--mine had something to do with hyperspace.



Ed

Edward Sutorik

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Brennan <brennan8@...> wrote:

From the NASA Commons on Flickr:
"(February 3, 1922) The Variable Density Tunnel arrives by rail from
the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company. "

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nasacommons/7605919454/

The short over-the-rails move would have been from the Newport News
docks to the nearby NACA (NASA predecessor) Langley Research Center.
The 1920-built flat is rated higher capacity than the somewhat
similar (and earlier) PRR F22.

...very modellogenic!


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------