Date   

Re: Tankcar Challenge

Douglas Harding
 

The reporting marks PCTX were assigned to the Poultry Transit Co.
1/1945-4/1947, then Poultry Transit Inc. 1/1950

WCHX was assigned to WC Haffner in 1/1945, then to Walter Haffner Co.
4/1947-7-1005



As the car was last used for animal by-products, it is quite possible it was
in similar service for earlier owner Poultry Transit Co.



Here is an interesting history of the Poultry Transit Co.
http://www.hoosiervalley.org/history/turkeys-and-trains/

It indicates that Poultry Transit Co. was formed in 1944 as a spin off by
North American Car Co. who had acquired Live Poultry Transit Co. in 1930.
North American's acquired North Judson (Ind) car repair shops in 1927, which
were located along the NYC, (ie the possible source of the trucks?). North
Judson apparently repaired tank cars, reefers and poultry cars.



To go further back: Live Poultry Transportation Co. predecessor to Live
Poultry Transit Co., owned approximately 700 cars, which were acquired by
International Equipment Co. and leased back to the newly formed Live Poultry
Transit Co. in 1913.

http://books.google.com/books?id=5WHXAAAAMAAJ
<http://books.google.com/books?id=5WHXAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA217&lpg=PA217&dq=%22poul
try+transit+co.%22&source=bl&ots=ZGsz-My0_f&sig=g4jsehcvOw6ckVlRX1UabX49CGw&
hl=en&sa=X&ei=5LGnUe6ZBorK0wGL44HQDg&ved=0CC4Q6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22poultry%
20transit%20co.%22&f=false>
&pg=PA217&lpg=PA217&dq=%22poultry+transit+co.%22&source=bl&ots=ZGsz-My0_f&si
g=g4jsehcvOw6ckVlRX1UabX49CGw&hl=en&sa=X&ei=5LGnUe6ZBorK0wGL44HQDg&ved=0CC4Q
6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22poultry%20transit%20co.%22&f=false



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Tankcar Challange

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 30, 2013, at 11:03 AM, soolinehistory <destorzek@mchsi.com> wrote:

OK, enough aeroplanes. I've got a freightcar question.

On the Railway Preservation News discussion board there is a question as to the origins of a tankcar presently at the Hoosier Valley Railroad Museum in North Judson, Indiana. The car was last used by the Walter Haffner Company, who dealt in animal by-products... yuck! Anyway, the museum would like to restore/repaint the car for an earlier era, and in general would like to nail down its history. One thought they had is since the car rides on Vulcan trucks with NYC cast in the sideframes, that the car is ex-NYC, but that really doesn't seem likely (it's possible) and it's not unusual for used trucks to make their way into service in the lease fleets.

Here's what is known so far:

AAR III, Built by AC&F 7/1919, last tested by Keith Tank Line at Longview TX 4/30/54. The last reporting marks were WCHX 1114, previous mark was PTCX 1103.

Photos are in the discussion at RyPN.org, I don't think you need to be registered to view the discusston at this link:

http://www.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=35047

If you read through the thread, you'll see I make quite the case for collaborating with the modeling fraternity, since modelers seem to do considerably more in depth research than the railway meseums do, simply because the museum folks are pre-occupied with just preserving and maintaining the stuff. Let's show them what we can do. I'm sure any information we can add, even general histories of the car design or fleets it was in would be appreciated.

Dennis, the car in question is an 8,000 gal. AC&F Type 17 built, as the stenciling says, in July, 1919. And that is the original AC&F underframe with AB air brake equipment replacing its original KC brakes. This car would originally have had two safety valves on an elbow attached to the dome, but they were doubtless removed and the hole plated over when the car was converted to carry non-regulatory commodities in the late 1950s; note the frangible disk relief valve on top of the dome. We know the car wasn't used for regulatory commodities much after 1954, since that's the last pressure test date. Cars used for non-regulatory commodities were not required to be pressure tested. As several people who contributed to the discussion pointed out, the fact that the truck side frames were originally cast for the New York Central is of no significance; most Type 17s were delivered with arch bar trucks which were, of course, required to be replaced on cars in interchange by 1941, and the original trucks were often replaced with second hand trucks. The Keith Railway Equipment Co. operated its own tank car fleet, but their extensive shops at Longview, TX performed tests and maintenance on cars for many tank car owners. PTCX were the reporting marks of the People's Transportation Co. of New Orleans, LA and first appeared in the Official Railway Equipment Registers in the mid-1960s showing six cars numbered 1101-1106. The ORERs provide no data about People's Transportation Co. or the commodities their cars carried, but someone with access to a major business affairs library might be able to track down more information. Their tank car fleet was short lived, as it appeared in the 10/65 ORER but was absent from the 10/67 ORER. I have no clue about who owned the PTCX cars before People's Transportation acquired them second hand, but there might some evidence for that on the car itself. The Walter Haffner Co., originally of Chicago, first appeared in the ORERs at the end of World War II with a fleet of almost 200 tank cars operating under WCHX reporting marks, mostly if not entirely second hand. By the '60s they had relocated their headquarters to Mobile, AL and operated a sizable tank car fleet. It appears that their cars carried a lot more than animal by-products, as they had insulated cars, high pressure cars. cars with aluminum tanks, etc. Photographic evidence indicates that most, if not all, of these cars continued to be acquired second (or third or fourth) hand.


Richard Hendrickson


Re: { SPAM 2 }: Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Al Campbell
 

If this took place in B&A country, anytime before June or after September.
From other parts of the country northern Maine winters last nine months.
:) Kinda like Northern Minnesota only colder. Al Campbell


Re: Tankcar Challange (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Dennis;

I agree with what some of the more...rational members of that blog posted. It indeed looks like an AC&F pre-Type-21 AAR III (later - 103) tank car, with the 5-sheet radial riveted top courses and single sheet bottom, fairly typical 2% dome and safety valve set-up, and what looks an awful lot like an AC&F u/f of that time period, with a more modern AB brake eqpt conversion. I don't think these cars were that unusual, but this is a nice example. Given its type and features, this may have been purchased for petroleum service, and the PTCX ownership may be a lead. I don't have my AC&F tank car book handy, but suspect there may be one or more examples in there, since this was a very common type. I agree those trucks look to be cast-offs. Sorry I have no info on the earlier owner.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of soolinehistory
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 2:04 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Tankcar Challange



OK, enough aeroplanes. I've got a freightcar question.

On the Railway Preservation News discussion board there is a question as to the origins of a tankcar presently at the Hoosier Valley Railroad Museum in North Judson, Indiana. The car was last used by the Walter Haffner Company, who dealt in animal by-products... yuck! Anyway, the museum would like to restore/repaint the car for an earlier era, and in general would like to nail down its history. One thought they had is since the car rides on Vulcan trucks with NYC cast in the sideframes, that the car is ex-NYC, but that really doesn't seem likely (it's possible) and it's not unusual for used trucks to make their way into service in the lease fleets.

Here's what is known so far:

AAR III, Built by AC&F 7/1919, last tested by Keith Tank Line at Longview TX 4/30/54. The last reporting marks were WCHX 1114, previous mark was PTCX 1103.

Photos are in the discussion at RyPN.org, I don't think you need to be registered to view the discusston at this link:

http://www.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=35047

If you read through the thread, you'll see I make quite the case for collaborating with the modeling fraternity, since modelers seem to do considerably more in depth research than the railway meseums do, simply because the museum folks are pre-occupied with just preserving and maintaining the stuff. Let's show them what we can do. I'm sure any information we can add, even general histories of the car design or fleets it was in would be appreciated.

Dennis Storzek





Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Tankcar Challange

Dennis Storzek
 

OK, enough aeroplanes. I've got a freightcar question.

On the Railway Preservation News discussion board there is a question as to the origins of a tankcar presently at the Hoosier Valley Railroad Museum in North Judson, Indiana. The car was last used by the Walter Haffner Company, who dealt in animal by-products... yuck! Anyway, the museum would like to restore/repaint the car for an earlier era, and in general would like to nail down its history. One thought they had is since the car rides on Vulcan trucks with NYC cast in the sideframes, that the car is ex-NYC, but that really doesn't seem likely (it's possible) and it's not unusual for used trucks to make their way into service in the lease fleets.

Here's what is known so far:

AAR III, Built by AC&F 7/1919, last tested by Keith Tank Line at Longview TX 4/30/54. The last reporting marks were WCHX 1114, previous mark was PTCX 1103.

Photos are in the discussion at RyPN.org, I don't think you need to be registered to view the discusston at this link:

http://www.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=35047

If you read through the thread, you'll see I make quite the case for collaborating with the modeling fraternity, since modelers seem to do considerably more in depth research than the railway meseums do, simply because the museum folks are pre-occupied with just preserving and maintaining the stuff. Let's show them what we can do. I'm sure any information we can add, even general histories of the car design or fleets it was in would be appreciated.

Dennis Storzek


{Disarmed} RE: { SPAM 2 }: Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Jon Miller <atsf@...> wrote:

On 5/30/2013 9:39 AM, Jeff Shultz wrote:
I wonder if it was one of those publicity stunt things
While that's a good guess I'm going to say that because the plane
belongs to the freight company, E.W. Wiggins, the plane is being
transported and it's not a stunt.
This is fun!:-)

Why? It's the perfect tie-in... boxcars carry freight... the airplane carries freight... especially during the thirties, when the idea of shipping anything other than mail by air was unheard of.

I also wonder about the arched board that shows in one photo... could it be a runway for a camera? Perhaps they had been filming a short to be distributed to the area movie houses to play with the newsreels.

How was the film of the race between the Cincinnati & Lake Erie "Red Devil" high speed car and the airplane distributed in 1930?

Dennis


Re: {Disarmed} RE: { SPAM 2 }: Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

On 5/30/2013 9:39 AM, Jeff Shultz wrote:
I wonder if it was one of those publicity stunt things
While that's a good guess I'm going to say that because the plane
belongs to the freight company, E.W. Wiggins, the plane is being
transported and it's not a stunt.
This is fun!:-)

--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: {Disarmed} RE: { SPAM 2 }: Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Jeff Shultz <jeff@...>
 

I wonder if it was one of those publicity stunt things, where they landed
the plane on top of the boxcar as the train was moving?

I've seen them land a Cub on top of a pickup truck with a platform on it.

On Thu, May 30, 2013 at 7:00 AM, Steve and Barb Hile
<shile@mindspring.com>wrote:

**


And that the ramp down is from one boxcar while the platform is on another.

Interestingly, they are Bangor and Aroostook boxcars and the plane is
lettered for a commercial guy who flies in the Northeast, including places
in Maine.

The guys doing the unloading (note the way everyone is facing on the down
ramp shot) are pretty well dressed for laborers, but it must be cold.

Regards,

Steve Hile

_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Bruce F. Smith
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 8:15 AM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: { SPAM 2 }:[STMFC] Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

I'll add that there seems to be a pretty significant wood platform on the
roof of the car. It's hard to tell if the Cub is being brought up from the
ground, or lowered to the ground in the photo with it on the ramp. Weird.

Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

On May 30, 2013, at 5:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:

Nick Fry wrote:
"Take a gander here:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/855954353/pic/list

We found these photos at the Barriger Library while cataloging our
new B&A collection. No caption on the back.

I thought you all would find them interesting, if someone has this at
RPM East next year I'm buying them a drink.

If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."

No way the aircraft was shipped on top of this boxcar as it wouldn't
make clearances. However, aircraft factories before WWII weren't
necessarily set up for efficient manufacturing (Ford's Willow Run
B-24 plant was still years in the future), with assembly facilities
often set up on the second floor of buildings. (Brewster in Long
Island City was a notorious case as their inefficient arrangement
contributed to their difficulties meeting wartime production.) I
have a photo of the wing assembly of the Spirit of St. Louis being
lowered from the second floor of Ryan Aircraft in San Diego in using
a Santa Fe automobile car as an intermediate platform. (Charles
Lindbergh is seen in the photo helping to push the car out of the
way.)

This aircraft is a Piper Cub. Here's a photo of Piper's Lock Haven,
PA facility:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fc/Piper_1930s_Picture.jpg

I couldn't find anything on the layout of this factory, but the photos
could be documenting an event similar to that of the Ryan photo. I
did find a website of the Piper Aviation Museum in Lock Haven, who
might be able to shed more light on their manufacturing facility
setup.
http://www.pipermuseum.com/

Ben Hom



--
Jeff Shultz
Error: Pithy Saying Generator not installed


Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

C J Wyatt
 

I have a WAG.

It's the old land a plane on a moving train stunt. After landing the wings were
removed for clearance to where the plane could be off-loaded.

Jack Wyatt


Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 30, 2013, at 8:49 AM, Jon Miller <atsf@izap.com> wrote:

On 5/30/2013 3:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:
If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."
SWAG; Given the era it's possible that with no overhead problems the
plane might have been transported a short distance (x miles). Not sure
that a truck, at that time and road conditions, could have done the job.
Looking up E.W. Wiggins in Wikipedia has some interesting
information. Could we assume the picture is 1929+?
Yes. The Piper Cub was introduced in the mid-1930s.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: { SPAM 2 }: Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 30, 2013, at 6:14 AM, Bruce F. Smith <smithbf@auburn.edu> wrote:

I'll add that there seems to be a pretty significant wood platform on the roof of the car. It's hard to tell if the Cub is being brought up from the ground, or lowered to the ground in the photo with it on the ramp. Weird.

I will suggest another, though perhaps unlikely, explanation for the platform, which is - as Bruce says - substantial, and runs the full length of the box car roof. What may be going on here is the aftermath of a stunt that is still performed from time to time at air shows in which the pilot of a Piper Cub (or similar light aircraft with a very slow stall speed) lands the aircraft on a platform on top of a pickup truck while the truck is moving just slightly faster than the the airplane's stall speed. A rail car moving at ca. 40 mph would have provided an equivalent landing platform back when there were very few paved airport runways on which a truck could operate at such speeds. Today when this stunt is performed the airplane takes off again after landing on the platform, so that doesn't explain why the wings have been removed from the Cub in the photo and it is being rolled off the car roof on what is obviously temporary planking. But it is possible to land a Cub on a small platform atop a moving vehicle, and it is still being done today.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Benjamin Hom
 

Jon Miller wrote:
"Could we assume the picture is 1929+?"

Yes.  Additionally, the earliest model of the Cub was introduced in 1935.

Ben Hom


Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Bruce Smith
 

Jon,

The reweigh date on the BAR car is October 1937.


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

/ &#92;

__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________

|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |

| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||

|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|

| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0

On May 30, 2013, at 10:49 AM, Jon Miller wrote:

On 5/30/2013 3:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:
If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."

SWAG; Given the era it's possible that with no overhead problems the
plane might have been transported a short distance (x miles). Not sure
that a truck, at that time and road conditions, could have done the job.
Looking up E.W. Wiggins in Wikipedia has some interesting
information. Could we assume the picture is 1929+?

--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Steven D Johnson
 

The re-weigh date on the boxcar in the side view is 10-37.



Steve Johnson





From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jon
Miller
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 10:49 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?





On 5/30/2013 3:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:
If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."
SWAG; Given the era it's possible that with no overhead problems the
plane might have been transported a short distance (x miles). Not sure
that a truck, at that time and road conditions, could have done the job.
Looking up E.W. Wiggins in Wikipedia has some interesting
information. Could we assume the picture is 1929+?

--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

On 5/30/2013 3:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:
If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."
SWAG; Given the era it's possible that with no overhead problems the
plane might have been transported a short distance (x miles). Not sure
that a truck, at that time and road conditions, could have done the job.
Looking up E.W. Wiggins in Wikipedia has some interesting
information. Could we assume the picture is 1929+?

--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: { SPAM 2 }: Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

thmsdmpsy
 

It could be clean-up from a movie shot.  Tom Dempsey, Spokane, WA




________________________________
From: Steve and Barb Hile <shile@mindspring.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 7:00 AM
Subject: RE: { SPAM 2 }:[STMFC] Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?



 
And that the ramp down is from one boxcar while the platform is on another.

Interestingly, they are Bangor and Aroostook boxcars and the plane is
lettered for a commercial guy who flies in the Northeast, including places
in Maine.

The guys doing the unloading (note the way everyone is facing on the down
ramp shot) are pretty well dressed for laborers, but it must be cold.

Regards,

Steve Hile

_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Bruce F. Smith
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 8:15 AM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: { SPAM 2 }:[STMFC] Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

I'll add that there seems to be a pretty significant wood platform on the
roof of the car. It's hard to tell if the Cub is being brought up from the
ground, or lowered to the ground in the photo with it on the ramp. Weird.

Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

On May 30, 2013, at 5:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:

Nick Fry wrote:
"Take a gander here:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/855954353/pic/list

We found these photos at the Barriger Library while cataloging our
new B&A collection. No caption on the back.

I thought you all would find them interesting, if someone has this at
RPM East next year I'm buying them a drink.

If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."

No way the aircraft was shipped on top of this boxcar as it wouldn't
make clearances. However, aircraft factories before WWII weren't
necessarily set up for efficient manufacturing (Ford's Willow Run
B-24 plant was still years in the future), with assembly facilities
often set up on the second floor of buildings. (Brewster in Long
Island City was a notorious case as their inefficient arrangement
contributed to their difficulties meeting wartime production.) I
have a photo of the wing assembly of the Spirit of St. Louis being
lowered from the second floor of Ryan Aircraft in San Diego in using
a Santa Fe automobile car as an intermediate platform. (Charles
Lindbergh is seen in the photo helping to push the car out of the
way.)

This aircraft is a Piper Cub. Here's a photo of Piper's Lock Haven,
PA facility:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fc/Piper_1930s_Picture.jpg

I couldn't find anything on the layout of this factory, but the photos
could be documenting an event similar to that of the Ryan photo. I
did find a website of the Piper Aviation Museum in Lock Haven, who
might be able to shed more light on their manufacturing facility
setup.
http://www.pipermuseum.com/

Ben Hom

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Soo Sawtooth box cars

Eric Hansmann
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "soolinehistory" <destorzek@...> wrote:
... Which I've added to my "Soo Sawtooth Primer folder at:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFPH/files/Soo_%22Sawtooth%22_Primer/

The photo is named "1926 Geared Handbrake". You can also see this part in the Pullman builders photo named "1926".

Dennis
======================


Thank you for this timely reminder, Dennis. I'm on the last few steps in building one of your Soo box car resin kits. This kit has been a joy to build. I have built six F&C kits in the last month before starting the Soo box car and there has been less stress in the Soo box car build than in any one of the previous six builds. It's hard to believe this kit is about 20 years old.

Clark asked how long it would take to build 100 resin freight car kits and I'd estimate each can be built and ready to paint in 10-15 hours of work. I'm about to move again (but only ten miles), so the home layout is on hold. I've spent most of my time at the new house with contractors, so I've spent my time building several resin kits on a makeshift workbench at my new home. Different kits have slightly different build times, but the more you build the easier it is to get rolling and make progress. The toughest part is taking a seat and opening the box to get started.

I plan to share my resin kit building adventures on my blog in the next couple of weeks.

Eric


Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX
http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/


Re: { SPAM 2 }: Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Steve and Barb Hile
 

And that the ramp down is from one boxcar while the platform is on another.



Interestingly, they are Bangor and Aroostook boxcars and the plane is
lettered for a commercial guy who flies in the Northeast, including places
in Maine.



The guys doing the unloading (note the way everyone is facing on the down
ramp shot) are pretty well dressed for laborers, but it must be cold.



Regards,

Steve Hile



_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Bruce F. Smith
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 8:15 AM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: { SPAM 2 }:[STMFC] Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?





I'll add that there seems to be a pretty significant wood platform on the
roof of the car. It's hard to tell if the Cub is being brought up from the
ground, or lowered to the ground in the photo with it on the ramp. Weird.

Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

On May 30, 2013, at 5:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:

Nick Fry wrote:
"Take a gander here:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/855954353/pic/list

We found these photos at the Barriger Library while cataloging our
new B&A collection. No caption on the back.

I thought you all would find them interesting, if someone has this at
RPM East next year I'm buying them a drink.

If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."

No way the aircraft was shipped on top of this boxcar as it wouldn't
make clearances. However, aircraft factories before WWII weren't
necessarily set up for efficient manufacturing (Ford's Willow Run
B-24 plant was still years in the future), with assembly facilities
often set up on the second floor of buildings. (Brewster in Long
Island City was a notorious case as their inefficient arrangement
contributed to their difficulties meeting wartime production.) I
have a photo of the wing assembly of the Spirit of St. Louis being
lowered from the second floor of Ryan Aircraft in San Diego in using
a Santa Fe automobile car as an intermediate platform. (Charles
Lindbergh is seen in the photo helping to push the car out of the
way.)

This aircraft is a Piper Cub. Here's a photo of Piper's Lock Haven,
PA facility:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fc/Piper_1930s_Picture.jpg

I couldn't find anything on the layout of this factory, but the photos
could be documenting an event similar to that of the Ryan photo. I
did find a website of the Piper Aviation Museum in Lock Haven, who
might be able to shed more light on their manufacturing facility
setup.
http://www.pipermuseum.com/

Ben Hom

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: { SPAM 2 }: Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Bruce Smith
 

I'll add that there seems to be a pretty significant wood platform on the roof of the car. It's hard to tell if the Cub is being brought up from the ground, or lowered to the ground in the photo with it on the ramp. Weird.


Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

On May 30, 2013, at 5:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:



Nick Fry wrote:
"Take a gander here:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/855954353/pic/list

We found these photos at the Barriger Library while cataloging our
new B&A collection. No caption on the back.

I thought you all would find them interesting, if someone has this at
RPM East next year I'm buying them a drink.

If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."

No way the aircraft was shipped on top of this boxcar as it wouldn't
make clearances. However, aircraft factories before WWII weren't
necessarily set up for efficient manufacturing (Ford's Willow Run
B-24 plant was still years in the future), with assembly facilities
often set up on the second floor of buildings. (Brewster in Long
Island City was a notorious case as their inefficient arrangement
contributed to their difficulties meeting wartime production.) I
have a photo of the wing assembly of the Spirit of St. Louis being
lowered from the second floor of Ryan Aircraft in San Diego in using
a Santa Fe automobile car as an intermediate platform. (Charles
Lindbergh is seen in the photo helping to push the car out of the
way.)

This aircraft is a Piper Cub. Here's a photo of Piper's Lock Haven,
PA facility:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fc/Piper_1930s_Picture.jpg

I couldn't find anything on the layout of this factory, but the photos
could be documenting an event similar to that of the Ryan photo. I
did find a website of the Piper Aviation Museum in Lock Haven, who
might be able to shed more light on their manufacturing facility
setup.
http://www.pipermuseum.com/


Ben Hom



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Benjamin Hom
 

Nick Fry wrote:
"Take a gander here:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/855954353/pic/list

We found these photos at the Barriger Library while cataloging our
new B&A collection. No caption on the back.

I thought you all would find them interesting, if someone has this at
RPM East next year I'm buying them a drink.

If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."

No way the aircraft was shipped on top of this boxcar as it wouldn't
make clearances. However, aircraft factories before WWII weren't
necessarily set up for efficient manufacturing (Ford's Willow Run
B-24 plant was still years in the future), with assembly facilities
often set up on the second floor of buildings. (Brewster in Long
Island City was a notorious case as their inefficient arrangement
contributed to their difficulties meeting wartime production.) I
have a photo of the wing assembly of the Spirit of St. Louis being
lowered from the second floor of Ryan Aircraft in San Diego in using
a Santa Fe automobile car as an intermediate platform. (Charles
Lindbergh is seen in the photo helping to push the car out of the
way.)

This aircraft is a Piper Cub. Here's a photo of Piper's Lock Haven,
PA facility:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fc/Piper_1930s_Picture.jpg

I couldn't find anything on the layout of this factory, but the photos
could be documenting an event similar to that of the Ryan photo. I
did find a website of the Piper Aviation Museum in Lock Haven, who
might be able to shed more light on their manufacturing facility
setup.
http://www.pipermuseum.com/


Ben Hom

73361 - 73380 of 189708