Date   

Re: Watermelon traffic in Southeast

water.kresse@...
 

Guy,

 

The late Gene Huddleston , photographer, writer and professor, worked summers at Russell during post-WW2 era as an assistant clerk.  Even into his eighties he said he could remember the horrible smell of decaying chunks of watermelon left in the cars coming back from Chicago getting ready to be assembled into a train heading down the Chinchfield Route back to Florida.  Reefers would have been cleaned out.

 

Conversely, ventilated boxes with watermelons heading north during the hot summers had to be checked out by yard crews for over-ripe produce that needed to pulled out to save the rest . . . . but those somehow were not bad enough to not be thrown out.

 

Al Kresse.

----- Original Message -----




From: guycwilber @ aol .com
To: STMFC @ yahoogroups .com
Sent: Saturday, July 27, 2013 1:15:28 AM
Subject: Re: [ STMFC ] Watermelon traffic in Southeast

Roger,
 
A 1946 USDA study in which the AAR's Freight Claim Division was a  
participant stated that the majority of watermelons shipped from Florida were  
loaded into ventilated box cars, though both refrigerator and stock cars  were
also used.  Stock car shipments of watermelons were dominant from the  other
Southern states, but also were supplemented by refrigerator and  ventilator
cars along with a regular box car now and then.
 
In 1951, your year of modeling interest, there were 25,536  car loads of
watermelons shipped.  Just two years earlier,  a 1949 study showed that the
dominant variety of watermelons from  the Southeast was the Black Diamond.  
That study examined watermelons  delivered to 43 markets nationwide.  Of the
6,776 cars inspected  for damage; 1,274 were ventilated box cars, 3,788 were
stock cars, 1,712 were  refrigerator cars and 2 were box cars.  
Unfortunately,  the tabulation does not show the break down of the car  types from the
various regions though it does show that 1,369 of the  6,776 cars originated
from the Southeast.
 
Regarding your thoughts on the harvest of watermelons.  The Florida  
harvest generally ran from May 1st thru mid August with June being the most  
productive month usually totaling over 75% of Florida's annual crop.
 
Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada
 
 
 
  



 
 




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Watermelon traffic in Southeast

james murrie
 

Stock cars may have been some of the cleanest cars on the road. They were thoroughly cleaned between loads of livestock. No shipper would want to have his stock contaminated by something from the previous load! That worn and weathered paint was as much a result of steam cleaning as anything else.
jim Murrie

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Mark Drake <markstation01@...> wrote:

One would assume the stock car was thoroughly cleaned prior to any food product being transported in it???

Mark L. Drake
eBay ID member1108


________________________________
From: "guycwilber@..." <guycwilber@...>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, July 27, 2013 1:15 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Watermelon traffic in Southeast

 

Roger,

A 1946 USDA study in which the AAR's Freight Claim Division was a
participant stated that the majority of watermelons shipped from Florida were
loaded into ventilated box cars, though both refrigerator and stock cars were
also used. Stock car shipments of watermelons were dominant from the other
Southern states, but also were supplemented by refrigerator and ventilator
cars along with a regular box car now and then.

In 1951, your year of modeling interest, there were 25,536 car loads of
watermelons shipped. Just two years earlier, a 1949 study showed that the
dominant variety of watermelons from the Southeast was the Black Diamond.
That study examined watermelons delivered to 43 markets nationwide. Of the
6,776 cars inspected for damage; 1,274 were ventilated box cars, 3,788 were
stock cars, 1,712 were refrigerator cars and 2 were box cars.
Unfortunately, the tabulation does not show the break down of the car types from the
various regions though it does show that 1,369 of the 6,776 cars originated
from the Southeast.

Regarding your thoughts on the harvest of watermelons. The Florida
harvest generally ran from May 1st thru mid August with June being the most
productive month usually totaling over 75% of Florida's annual crop.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: My first airbrush

O Fenton Wells
 

Gentlemen, I too am going to the acrylic paints with dragging feet and
needing a big push. I have done a few acrylic paint jobs and one went
pretty well and the others were OK but I didn't feel I got the same results
as with Lacquer based paints, Floquil and Scalecoat, especially on resin
kits. I did like the ability to do a three color diesel in one evening
with the help of a hair dryer. I have used a Binks Wren B airbrush since
1972 when I was trained. What is the best airbrush recommendation for
spraying acrylics I have a double action Paasche Millennium internal mix
siphon feed brush that I have never used.
I welcome thoughts and suggestions from those who have been successful with
acrylics. Unfortunatly I feel the problem is really me as I have a habit,
when I'm comfortable with something and will hesitate to try new things. I
have not gotten comfortable with acrylics....yet.
Fenton Wells


On Sat, Jul 27, 2013 at 10:37 AM, Jack Burgess <jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com>wrote:

**


I used Badger air brushes for years, first single-action and then
dual-action. The dual-action ones require that you do two things at the
same
time...push down on the button to control the amount of air and pull back
to
control the amount of paint. It sounds very difficult. But the problem I
had
with the single-action air brushes (where the amount of paint is controlled
by a screw adjustment) is that I'd carefully set the screw adjustment to
produce a very thin line of paint and once I started spraying, the tip
would
clog just a little and the air brush would stop painting and I'd need to
stop and adjust it again. If you feel that you could start with a
double-action air brush, I'd recommend that you do.

Bruce's advise about acrylics is good. I started out air-brushing Floquil
(and Scalecoat for brass) and still use Floquil, regardless of complaints
about color quality control. (When Testors announced the discontinuance of
Floquil, I put in a $200 order with Caboose Hobbies of the colors I use the
most...I think that I'll have enough to finish my stash of 100 resin
kits.)

All of the Badger air brushes were siphon-feed air brushes. After using a
couple of types of Badger air brushes for nearly four decades, I bought a
gravity-feed Iwata air brush after trying it out at a NMRA Train Show. With
Floquil, I have found that I don't need to dilute the paint with thinner to
air brush it...that saves paint since you shouldn't pour diluted paint back
into the bottle (although I've been known to do that). I think that the
Iwata air brush is a superior brand but, for most of us, it might depend
mostly on what you started out with...I was generally happy with the Badger
air brushes but I'm not intimidated by trying something new (unless it is
acrylic paints). <g>

Jack Burgess

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@gmail.com


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: My first airbrush

Jack Burgess
 

I used Badger air brushes for years, first single-action and then
dual-action. The dual-action ones require that you do two things at the same
time...push down on the button to control the amount of air and pull back to
control the amount of paint. It sounds very difficult. But the problem I had
with the single-action air brushes (where the amount of paint is controlled
by a screw adjustment) is that I'd carefully set the screw adjustment to
produce a very thin line of paint and once I started spraying, the tip would
clog just a little and the air brush would stop painting and I'd need to
stop and adjust it again. If you feel that you could start with a
double-action air brush, I'd recommend that you do.

Bruce's advise about acrylics is good. I started out air-brushing Floquil
(and Scalecoat for brass) and still use Floquil, regardless of complaints
about color quality control. (When Testors announced the discontinuance of
Floquil, I put in a $200 order with Caboose Hobbies of the colors I use the
most...I think that I'll have enough to finish my stash of 100 resin kits.)

All of the Badger air brushes were siphon-feed air brushes. After using a
couple of types of Badger air brushes for nearly four decades, I bought a
gravity-feed Iwata air brush after trying it out at a NMRA Train Show. With
Floquil, I have found that I don't need to dilute the paint with thinner to
air brush it...that saves paint since you shouldn't pour diluted paint back
into the bottle (although I've been known to do that). I think that the
Iwata air brush is a superior brand but, for most of us, it might depend
mostly on what you started out with...I was generally happy with the Badger
air brushes but I'm not intimidated by trying something new (unless it is
acrylic paints). <g>

Jack Burgess


Re: My first airbrush

Dennis Williams
 

Keith
  I own 6 airbrushes.  Out of the 6, I have 2 Badger 150s.  I wore the 1st one out.  By the way, it was one of the first 150s.  I bought one direct from Badger at their "garage sale" for $35.00.  I told Dino at Badger, about the airbrush and he wanted to see it.  I sent it out and a week or so it returned.  They totally rebuilt it.  I called and asked what the price was on the rebuild and he said the airbrush was garrenteed for life.  What a deal!!!!

Dennis Williams/Owner
http://www.resinbuilders4u.com/


________________________________
From: Bruce F. Smith <smithbf@auburn.edu>
To: "STMFC@yahoogroups.com" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, July 27, 2013 9:32 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] My first airbrush


 

Keith,

What airbrush to use is a topic akin to religion. Everyone has their own idea of what is best. Likely, we'll now hear a long litany of "I use XYZ and love it..." with more brands named than you can count. Instead of doing that, I suggest that you do two things. Fist think about versatility. You may not use acrylics right now, for example, but that is definitely the trend in the paint industry, so you might want to purchase an airbrush designed to work well with them. Second, test drive a few to see how YOU like them. (Oh and there are lengthy discussions in the archives on how to best use any number of airbrushes)

Regards
Bruce (a Badger 220 user)
Bruce Smith
Auburn AL
________________________________________
From: mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com] on behalf of hvyweight41 [mailto:hvyweight41%40yahoo.com]
Sent: Saturday, July 27, 2013 12:47 AM
To: mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] My first airbrush

I see the need to plan to acquire an airbrush for my modeling efforts. This may be off topic for this group but I was wondering if you all have any input on what direction I should go. If off topic, feel free to contact me off list.
I already have a compressor in my garage. I'm looking at the A7778 Metal Body Airbrushby Testor. It's probably more than I need right now, but I figure I'll grow into it. I've seen other brands like Badger, Paasche and Iwata. All get good reviews. I'm sure there are favorites out there. Oh, I will be using it for general painting as well weathering.
Any input is appreciated.
Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Watermelon traffic in Southeast

O Fenton Wells
 

Interesting information Guy, thanks for sharing.
Fenton Wells

On Sat, Jul 27, 2013 at 1:15 AM, <guycwilber@aol.com> wrote:

**


Roger,

A 1946 USDA study in which the AAR's Freight Claim Division was a
participant stated that the majority of watermelons shipped from Florida
were
loaded into ventilated box cars, though both refrigerator and stock cars
were
also used. Stock car shipments of watermelons were dominant from the other
Southern states, but also were supplemented by refrigerator and ventilator
cars along with a regular box car now and then.

In 1951, your year of modeling interest, there were 25,536 car loads of
watermelons shipped. Just two years earlier, a 1949 study showed that the
dominant variety of watermelons from the Southeast was the Black Diamond.
That study examined watermelons delivered to 43 markets nationwide. Of the
6,776 cars inspected for damage; 1,274 were ventilated box cars, 3,788
were
stock cars, 1,712 were refrigerator cars and 2 were box cars.
Unfortunately, the tabulation does not show the break down of the car
types from the
various regions though it does show that 1,369 of the 6,776 cars
originated
from the Southeast.

Regarding your thoughts on the harvest of watermelons. The Florida
harvest generally ran from May 1st thru mid August with June being the
most
productive month usually totaling over 75% of Florida's annual crop.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@gmail.com


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: My first airbrush

Bruce Smith
 

Keith,

What airbrush to use is a topic akin to religion. Everyone has their own idea of what is best. Likely, we'll now hear a long litany of "I use XYZ and love it..." with more brands named than you can count. Instead of doing that, I suggest that you do two things. Fist think about versatility. You may not use acrylics right now, for example, but that is definitely the trend in the paint industry, so you might want to purchase an airbrush designed to work well with them. Second, test drive a few to see how YOU like them. (Oh and there are lengthy discussions in the archives on how to best use any number of airbrushes)

Regards
Bruce (a Badger 220 user)
Bruce Smith
Auburn AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [STMFC@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of hvyweight41 [hvyweight41@yahoo.com]
Sent: Saturday, July 27, 2013 12:47 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] My first airbrush

I see the need to plan to acquire an airbrush for my modeling efforts. This may be off topic for this group but I was wondering if you all have any input on what direction I should go. If off topic, feel free to contact me off list.
I already have a compressor in my garage. I'm looking at the A7778 Metal Body Airbrushby Testor. It's probably more than I need right now, but I figure I'll grow into it. I've seen other brands like Badger, Paasche and Iwata. All get good reviews. I'm sure there are favorites out there. Oh, I will be using it for general painting as well weathering.
Any input is appreciated.
Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Spotting features

John
 

Keith:

What I have done is to invest in a fairly large selection of parts. I have one of those WalMart 4-drawer plastic storage units that has 12"x12"x2-1/2" drawers.

The top drawer contains freight car trucks of all sorts and sized (I just ordered 9 more various trucks from Tahoe). The second drawer contains roofs, running boards and underframes (varous sources), the third drawer contains doors, ends and bagged detail parts (ladders, tack board, and other side & end details), the fourth drawer is random parts that I did not use when building models (it contains anything you can think of).

I do have two other containers. One is about the size of a Plano 3700 tackle box, but has no dividers. That contains all brake parts (AB, ABD, KC and KD), brake wheels and other details such as brake rods, retainer valves, brake platforms, etc.

The last container is a small divided tackle box, the kind you store hooks in. One compartment has eye bolts, one angle grabs (the type on the roof corners - also usable for some cabooses), one has curved caboose side grabs, one has straight grab irons from 11" to 36" long (scale inches), one has drop grabs (mainly 19" but others too) and one has coupler cut levers.

Now before you ask how much did that all cost, remember that I don't smoke or drink, so the money someone would waste on cigarettes or booze go into parts and these parts have been collected over a 30-year period.

The best place to get started getting these parts is the Detail Associates section of the Walthers catalog, Tichy trains and, hidden on the Atlas website is all the old Branchline Trains details parts.

Also, go to train shows. You have a great one in JAX each year, and look through the "junk" vendors. You can buy lots of parts and even whole kits dirt cheap. Undecorated kits are usually plentiful and cost less than decorated ones. So even if I don't need a C&BT shops boxcar today, for $2 or $3, I'll grab it for future projects or even parts. When Branchline sold their RR cars to Atlas, I bought every undecorated Branchline kit I could get my hands on (probably have 10 or 15). Finaly, as I alluded above, I never throw out parts (except plastic wheels and hook-horn couplers) but toss them in the parts drawer. That is the first place I go for detail parts for a model I am working on.

-- John

P.S. Almost forgot. Have two other Plano 3700 boxes. One full of Kadee, P2k and Intermountain wheel sets and the other is full of Kadee couplers, although I mostly use the "Scale" whisker couplers these days, but I have at least a few pairs of each model they make if I have a difficult fit (e.g., front coupler on a steam engine).


Re: My first airbrush

Clark Propst
 

Keith,
I'm sure you'll get plenty of recommendations for the best airbrush to paint and weather your freight cars with.

I've used a Paasche H for years. The thing is a tank. I have siphon lids made up for the common paint brands. I unscrew the paint bottle lid, screw on the appropriate siphon lid, stick it on the airbrush and paint. If I'm painting a car more than one color I start with the lightest color and work darker to avoid cleaning the brush between colors. After painting I clean by squirt brake cleaner through the brush and lid. The average cars takes less than 10 mins. to paint. Start to finish. I do disassemble and clean the airbrush in lacquer thinner a couple times a year if I'm doing a lot of rolling stock.

PS This approach doesn't work well with acrylics. If I use them I have enough air hose to get to a sink so I can flush clean the brush and lid with water.

That's my bottom of the barrel simple and quick approach...
Clark Propst


Re: Watermelon traffic in Southeast

JoelDee
 

Beyond the normal dumping of the floor sand base,Why would the stock cars need cleaning?  Melons grow in dung and are rinsed and waxed for resale before showing up on the store rack.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Watermelon traffic in Southeast

Mark Drake <markstation01@...>
 

One would assume the stock car was thoroughly cleaned prior to any food product being transported in it???

Mark L. Drake
eBay ID member1108


________________________________
From: "guycwilber@aol.com" <guycwilber@aol.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, July 27, 2013 1:15 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Watermelon traffic in Southeast

 

Roger,

A 1946 USDA study in which the AAR's Freight Claim Division was a
participant stated that the majority of watermelons shipped from Florida were
loaded into ventilated box cars, though both refrigerator and stock cars were
also used. Stock car shipments of watermelons were dominant from the other
Southern states, but also were supplemented by refrigerator and ventilator
cars along with a regular box car now and then.

In 1951, your year of modeling interest, there were 25,536 car loads of
watermelons shipped. Just two years earlier, a 1949 study showed that the
dominant variety of watermelons from the Southeast was the Black Diamond.
That study examined watermelons delivered to 43 markets nationwide. Of the
6,776 cars inspected for damage; 1,274 were ventilated box cars, 3,788 were
stock cars, 1,712 were refrigerator cars and 2 were box cars.
Unfortunately, the tabulation does not show the break down of the car types from the
various regions though it does show that 1,369 of the 6,776 cars originated
from the Southeast.

Regarding your thoughts on the harvest of watermelons. The Florida
harvest generally ran from May 1st thru mid August with June being the most
productive month usually totaling over 75% of Florida's annual crop.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


My first airbrush

hvyweight41
 

I see the need to plan to acquire an airbrush for my modeling efforts. This may be off topic for this group but I was wondering if you all have any input on what direction I should go. If off topic, feel free to contact me off list.
I already have a compressor in my garage. I'm looking at the A7778 Metal Body Airbrushby Testor. It's probably more than I need right now, but I figure I'll grow into it. I've seen other brands like Badger, Paasche and Iwata. All get good reviews. I'm sure there are favorites out there. Oh, I will be using it for general painting as well weathering.
Any input is appreciated.
Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL


Re: Spotting features

hvyweight41
 

Richard-
I am a member of the SFRHMS. I have amassed a large library of reference books, including many written by yourself. I've only read a small portion of them in detail. My primary intent of this post was to find the best place to start. I can identify what type of car (box, hopper, etc) and size. I can generally identify the railroad. I can identify general types of construction for sides and ends. I can tell a sliding door from a plug type. I'm weak on roofs. When it comes to detaIls, do you focus on stirrup styles, brake system details, brake wheels, roof walks, etc? Should I focus on details or take a broader stroke first? Like so many other things in our world, it is probably another "it depends" situation. I'm trying see where I should focus my attention first. All of the feedback has been great.
Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Jul 26, 2013, at 6:04 PM, "John Sykes" <John.Sykes@...> wrote:
Keith:

[snip]

Now, the one thing you definitely have going for you is that you are doing Santa Fe, which, like PRR has a huge following of modelers and other fanatics. So you should be in the same situation, where you can get diagrams, rosters, photos, paint and lettering information too. You might have to look, but I guarantee it is out there.

John is right, and the place to start is with the Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society, which is having its annual meeting next weekend in Flagstaff AZ. Flagstaff is a long way from Jacksonville, but the society is as near as its web site <http://www.atsfrr.com>. The society has a long list of books in print, including its Rolling Stock Reference Series, as well as a variety of on site resources.


Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Watermelon traffic in Southeast

Guy Wilber
 

Roger,

A 1946 USDA study in which the AAR's Freight Claim Division was a
participant stated that the majority of watermelons shipped from Florida were
loaded into ventilated box cars, though both refrigerator and stock cars were
also used. Stock car shipments of watermelons were dominant from the other
Southern states, but also were supplemented by refrigerator and ventilator
cars along with a regular box car now and then.

In 1951, your year of modeling interest, there were 25,536 car loads of
watermelons shipped. Just two years earlier, a 1949 study showed that the
dominant variety of watermelons from the Southeast was the Black Diamond.
That study examined watermelons delivered to 43 markets nationwide. Of the
6,776 cars inspected for damage; 1,274 were ventilated box cars, 3,788 were
stock cars, 1,712 were refrigerator cars and 2 were box cars.
Unfortunately, the tabulation does not show the break down of the car types from the
various regions though it does show that 1,369 of the 6,776 cars originated
from the Southeast.

Regarding your thoughts on the harvest of watermelons. The Florida
harvest generally ran from May 1st thru mid August with June being the most
productive month usually totaling over 75% of Florida's annual crop.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada













[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Mechanical reefers' origin

Tony Thompson
 

Rupert Gamlen wrote:
There was a discussion earlier this year (and in previous years) about the origins of mechanical reefers. I found a piece in the 1885 National Car Builder referring to the Palmer refrigerator car that had a mechanical refrigerating plant, similar to ammonia ice making machines, instead of ice. The compressors were belt driven from the axle. There was a similar piece in a 1888 Railway World, which stated the plant used chloride of ethyl instead of ammonia.
Rupert, there seems to have been a preoccupation among American inventors to devise a mechanical system of refrigeration. The patents and other forms of invention are endless. Most were never built, some had subsize equipment built as a demonstration, and a very few progressed to complete cars. They all shared two important characteristics: they were complicated (thus expensive to build and a challenge to maintain), and they were simply not durable. Workable mechanical reefers had to wait for the development of the cheap and dependable small diesel engine, during World War II. Anything before that was really a pipe dream.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Spotting features

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 26, 2013, at 6:04 PM, "John Sykes" <John.Sykes@us.army.mil> wrote:
Keith:

[snip]

Now, the one thing you definitely have going for you is that you are doing Santa Fe, which, like PRR has a huge following of modelers and other fanatics. So you should be in the same situation, where you can get diagrams, rosters, photos, paint and lettering information too. You might have to look, but I guarantee it is out there.

John is right, and the place to start is with the Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society, which is having its annual meeting next weekend in Flagstaff AZ. Flagstaff is a long way from Jacksonville, but the society is as near as its web site <http://www.atsfrr.com>. The society has a long list of books in print, including its Rolling Stock Reference Series, as well as a variety of on site resources.


Richard Hendrickson


Mechanical reefers' origin

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

There was a discussion earlier this year (and in previous years) about the
origins of mechanical reefers. I found a piece in the 1885 National Car
Builder referring to the Palmer refrigerator car that had a mechanical
refrigerating plant, similar to ammonia ice making machines, instead of ice.
The compressors were belt driven from the axle. There was a similar piece in
a 1888 Railway World, which stated the plant used chloride of ethyl instead
of ammonia.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ


Re: Spotting features

John
 

Keith:

I think one of the most important things is research. In order to do that you have to spend some serious $$$. Elden and I and some of the others here are modeling PRR. Luckily for us there is a wealth of information out there including car diagrams, rosters, literally dozens of books of photos, lettering diagrams, paint information, etc., etc. I have about $2,000 of PRR books and research materials on my bookcase, maybe more (I know Bruce, Eldon and some of the others here have me beat easily on that account). I have put together rosters of PRR equipment covering freight, passenger, MoW, diesels, electric motors and now, even some steam (I finally got a hold of Keystone Steam & Electric - Yee-Ha!). That is how I learn to tell the difference between an X26, an X29 and a GG1.

But for a better example, as I said, although I model PRR, as Elden said, that requires putting other RR's rolling stock on the layout too. So for that reason, I acquired copies of all the Erie RR's freight car diagrams, rosters and a color photo book, as well as similar information for DL&W, Reading, Lehigh Valley, etc.

Now, the one thing you definitely have going for you is that you are doing Santa Fe, which, like PRR has a huge following of modelers and other fanatics. So you should be in the same situation, where you can get diagrams, rosters, photos, paint and lettering information too. You might have to look, but I guarantee it is out there. If you are going to do this right, you will eventually have one of the largest Santa Fe libraries in Jacksonville, FL.

-- John

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "hvyweight41" <hvyweight41@...> wrote:



Greg-
Thank you for your insight. As a recap, I model the Santa Fe in the SW, specifically Raton Pass from the C&S interchange to the tunnel. I model in N scale. The era is the summer of 1942. My thinking is that the war has started but things are still building up. I envision troop trains with heavyweight sleepers in addition to the regularly scheduled passenger trains. Super Chief! I know that the Belen cutoff moved most transcon freight traffic to the southern main. However, there is exchange with the C&S at Trinidad, perishable traffic eastbound to the big cities and a few local freights to fill in. Trinidad has a yard but I have been unable to find out much about how it operated, other than support of the declining coal production in the area. There was a POW camp near Trinidad during WW2 and I though that might be a unique source of traffic.
I have a couple hundred HO kits that I intend to assemble. I like to model but have not done anything consistently since I was a teenager. I would rate my skill level as beginner but I may be slightly better than that. I hope to refine my skills doing this HO work before tackling N scale detail work.
I'm looking for some projects that will be challenging but not overwhelming. The map heralds are germane to my era and I thought maybe a Bx-37 boxcar or Rr-27 reefer rebuild with the maps would be a good start. Any thought?
Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, tgregmrtn@ wrote:

Keith,

In context:
-
-
In a message Keith Kempster writes:


"Hi all-
I have seen numerous posts which discuss spotting features. I understand
there are the basic differences between types and sizes of rolling stock
(I.E. box versus hopper, 40 versus 50 foot, single versus double door, etc)."
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Let's stop for just a moment and remind us what era you are planning to
model that allows us to help you. I think I saw that you like the Santa Fe and
what era do you favor, if like Richard Hendrickson and his 1947 era it
put the dos and don'ts into perspective. Later and some doors open while
others close. Think in terms of availability and your personal skill level,
you haven't shared that either. I am not knocking you but just trying to help
us help you. Region make a difference as well, Santa Fe ~ Chicago vs.
Santa Fe ~ San Diego things change as California was growing rapidly and many
if not most products were produced in the east and shipped west and this
would change in the eras beyond this list.
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"I've read various discussions on ends, roofs, underframes and doors."
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Subtle changes in freight car appliances change/improved over the years so
your era may never have experienced a Santa Fe Pullman Standard PS-1
40-foot boxcar or 50-foot for that mater so some of the differences in roof
panels and side sheathing, underframes and door may be less of a concern. If so
you choice of ready to run kits might just be more limiting and thus you
may have to buy more resin kits or scratch-bash more Styrene kits. The Santa
Fe had a class of cars with 4/4 dreadnaught ends on with diagonal panel
roof that were on the property much later than one would expect in the 1940's
a rather rare combination, but I photographed a sample of the car in work
service in the 1990's just because it was so rare. You might consider
scratch-bashing a Santa Fe BX-28 or BX-31 class cars, I am considering these
for a future SHAKE_N_TAKE project in Cocoa Beach, it shouldn't be much of a
challenge for my skill level.
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" I even have two of Ted Culotta's freight car handbooks with a wealth of
information."
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I always say FEED YOUR HEAD!
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"Is there a consensus on the best spotting features to discriminate
whether a model is correct for a given prototype or even to identify a picture?
Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL"

Unfortunately no, but there is always this list to ask before you jump in.
Another good source is Train Life and a few well placed evenings with your
laptop or your tablet on your lap in the family room on the couch with
your shoes off and your feet up with a note pad and plenty of sharp pencils,
perhaps this winter... wait, what was I thinking you live in Florida... 3^)
No cold nights.

Research then Model and research more then model twice as much but never
stop modeling.

Greg Martin


Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Watermelon traffic in Southeast

George Courtney
 

Just a shot in the dark, but I would think the vent cars were dual service and in the early years cheaper to build than a reefer with it's insulation. Thus the vents/boxcars saved money over building more reefers than necessary for traffic that required reefers.

George Courtney

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I will take a stab at this although I have not hard evidence. I can think of two reasons at least.

1. The several railroads in the southeast already owned their vents. This of course is obvious and of course they were dual service, so no compelling reason to get rid of them until they were worn out.

2. The RR's received the money for handling the items that did not need FGE's "Protective Service" which meant the RR's got some income. The shipper would have probably gotten a better rate too.

I am traveling and do not have ORERs with me, but I do remember that the number of Vents began to drop after WWII, meaning FGE would have probably taken up the slack.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "rwilson1056" <rwilson1056@> wrote:

Been wondering why SAL & ACL would not have utilized FGE reefer in vent service. Wouldn't it have been easier to use the reefers as vents since watermelons moved late spring early summer when the citrus rush wasn't on? would have made both rr's vents expendable.
Roger Wilson
considering modeling SAL's Tallahassee Sub late spring 1951...


Re: WTB: O scale Pac Ltd 1932 ara boxcars

proto48er
 

Brad -

DTD (Dan's Train Depot) has one on Ebay right now - a C&O car with Hutchins radial roof, express version with Allied full cushion trucks. No dog in this hunt!

A.T. Kott

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "cereshill" <cereshill@...> wrote:

Fellas,

I am seeking a model or two; bare brass is fine. Please email me off list with images, contact and asking price.

Thank you,
Brad Andonian

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