Date   

Re: Storing paint (was Re: My first airbrush )

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

One other tip about the inverted Floquil method of paint storage is to wipe
a light film of Vaseline on the bottle threads as a lubricant and seal. I've
easily reopened old square bottles of Floquil with a price tag of $1.00
using this method (think 1978).



Besides the inverted bottle method, I've found another method for storing
acrylics that doesn't require shaking the bottle to suspend settled paint
solids. I cut a supply of 2 x 2 in. squares of waxed paper. When I open a
new bottle of paint, I wipe all the paint from the inside of the bottle cap
and the bottle threads with a paper towel. I place a square of waxed paper
on top of the bottle, and screw the lid down tight. I never shake a bottle
of acrylic paint, but mix with a craft stick, a.k.a. Popsicle stick from
Hobby Lobby or other craft store. I wipe the paint off the stick with a
paper towel and let it dry for reuse several times, but I only use used
sticks with like colors, and I never reuse sticks after stirring metallic
paints, e.g. flat aluminum, etc. I use a plastic disposable pipette to
transfer paint for thinning or mixing custom colors. Pipettes can be washed
out with soap and water and reused if you fill them with water and put them
in a container of soapy water immediately after use. I use Dove detergent
for soapy water, but Windex also works well for cleaning acrylics. I never
pour from the bottle to keep the threads clean, and I always wipe off any
paint the splashes on the bottle lip from stirring or paint transfer with a
pipette before replacing the waxed paper and bottle cap. I use a new piece
of waxed paper each time I open the bottle. The trick is to keep the bottle
threads clean, and use the waxed paper as a gasket to exclude air. This
method has been successful in preserving bottles of acrylic paints for at
least five years after opening, which is as long as I've been using acrylic
paints. Of course the paints I use are all STEAM ERA FREIGHT CAR paints ; )



Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
va661midlo@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 10:48 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Storing paint (was Re: My first airbrush )





Dick,

That's the technique that I have used over the years with all paints.

Ken Montero

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dick Harley" <dick.harley4up@...
<mailto:dick.harley4up%40verizon.net> >
To: "STMFC" <STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> >
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 7:17:44 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Storing paint (was Re: My first airbrush )

Last weekend's discussion of air brushes devolved into a discussion
of how long Floquil paint will remain liquid in the jar. A simple
way to store model paints without them evaporating is to store the
jars upside down. This has two immediate advantages: 1) the heavier
materials settle to the bottom and seal the lid, keeping the lighter
volatiles trapped inside the glass jar, and 2) when you unscrew the
lid, you can tell if all the pigment has been mixed back into the paint.

I have some square bottles of Floquil that are still liquid and must
be close to 50 years old. I don't use it much, obviously.

This trick is not quite as useful for polyethylene bottles, since the
polyethylene itself is a bit porous.

Another trick is to put a splash of paint on the bottom of the
bottle, so you can easily see what the color is by looking at the
ends of the bottles - assuming you store the bottles upside down in a
drawer or similar container.

Cheers,
Dick Harley
Laguna Beach, CA


Re: Storing paint (was Re: My first airbrush )

O Fenton Wells
 

As far as stored paint goes, I don't turn the bottles upside down but I do
wipe off the inside of the caps and the top and neck of the bottle prior to
closing them up. I also keep good seals in the lids. I'm still using
Floquil that is over 25 years old, of course some say it's reflected in my
poor paint jobs. Never the less when they get to old I only use them with
a brush for structures and touch up.
Fenton Wells

On Tue, Jul 30, 2013 at 11:47 PM, <va661midlo@...> wrote:

**


Dick,

That's the technique that I have used over the years with all paints.

Ken Montero

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dick Harley" <dick.harley4up@...>
To: "STMFC" <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 7:17:44 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Storing paint (was Re: My first airbrush )

Last weekend's discussion of air brushes devolved into a discussion
of how long Floquil paint will remain liquid in the jar. A simple
way to store model paints without them evaporating is to store the
jars upside down. This has two immediate advantages: 1) the heavier
materials settle to the bottom and seal the lid, keeping the lighter
volatiles trapped inside the glass jar, and 2) when you unscrew the
lid, you can tell if all the pigment has been mixed back into the paint.

I have some square bottles of Floquil that are still liquid and must
be close to 50 years old. I don't use it much, obviously.

This trick is not quite as useful for polyethylene bottles, since the
polyethylene itself is a bit porous.

Another trick is to put a splash of paint on the bottom of the
bottle, so you can easily see what the color is by looking at the
ends of the bottles - assuming you store the bottles upside down in a
drawer or similar container.

Cheers,
Dick Harley
Laguna Beach, CA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: DT&I 16000-16199 and 16200-16263

Eric Lombard
 

Dennis - I am afraid that my description was open to multiple interpretations and at the risk of making mud... but with the aim of bringing clarity..

My reference is to symmetry of the entire right side of the car (as opposed to the side of the the car to the right of the door) versus the entire left side of the car (as opposed to the side of the car to the left of the door). In other words, does the car side have the same pattern of door placement and side sheets when viewed from the left side of the track as when viewed from the right side of the track?

The DT&I cars have a different pattern of side sheets and door placement on the entire right side versus the entire left side. The cars look different depending on the side of the track on which you are standing.

On the Soo cars do you mean that the left door post was moved on one side of the car and the right post on the other side of the car in which case the pattern of side sheets and door placement would look different depending on which side of the track you stood (asymmetrical sides)? Or do you mean that the same door post (say the right) was moved on both sides of the car in which case the pattern of the side sheets and the door placement would look the same from both sides of the track even though the doors were now not centered (staggered doors with the symmetrical sides)?

This geometry requires another cup of coffee...

Eric

--- In STMFC@..., "soolinehistory" <destorzek@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@..., "soolinehistory" <destorzek@> wrote:


It's THAT uncommon. The Soo Line had a series of forty eight 50' steel cars built in 1936 (and pictured in the 1940 CBC, IIRC). As built, they had six foot wide doors, when rebuilt in the fifties with 8' doors, only one door post was moved, so the doors were slightly off center.

Dennis
Where'd the NOT go? I meant to say its NOT that uncommon...

Dennis


Re: Storing paint (was Re: My first airbrush )

Kenneth Montero
 

Dick,

That's the technique that I have used over the years with all paints.

Ken Montero

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dick Harley" <dick.harley4up@...>
To: "STMFC" <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 7:17:44 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Storing paint (was Re: My first airbrush )






Last weekend's discussion of air brushes devolved into a discussion
of how long Floquil paint will remain liquid in the jar. A simple
way to store model paints without them evaporating is to store the
jars upside down. This has two immediate advantages: 1) the heavier
materials settle to the bottom and seal the lid, keeping the lighter
volatiles trapped inside the glass jar, and 2) when you unscrew the
lid, you can tell if all the pigment has been mixed back into the paint.

I have some square bottles of Floquil that are still liquid and must
be close to 50 years old. I don't use it much, obviously.

This trick is not quite as useful for polyethylene bottles, since the
polyethylene itself is a bit porous.

Another trick is to put a splash of paint on the bottom of the
bottle, so you can easily see what the color is by looking at the
ends of the bottles - assuming you store the bottles upside down in a
drawer or similar container.

Cheers,
Dick Harley
Laguna Beach, CA




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: DL&W 46155 gets a load of bagged limestone 1957 (UNCLASSIFIED)

Jack Mullen
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Gatwood, Elden SAW" <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Door? Door? So, now you want a door?

So, here's a door....

Elden Gatwood

http://images.library.pitt.edu/cgi-bin/i/image/image-idx?rgn1=ic_all;op2=And;rgn2=ic_all;xc=1;g=imls;sort=dc_da;q1=railroad;size=20;c=hpicasc;c=hpicchatham;c=hpiccma;c=hpichswp;c=hpicmonroeville;c=hpicnpl;c=hpicoakmont;c=hpicphlf;c=hpicpitcairn;c=hpicpointpark;c=hpicrsc;c=hpicusc;back=back1375190442;subview=detail;resnum=4638;view=entry;lastview=thumbnail;cc=hpicasc;entryid=x-200907.1957.10021;viewid=20121127-HPICASC-0125.TIF


Yeah, that's the one we were looking for! Hey, great service, Eldon.
Nice of them to take the door off so we'd have a clear view of the Phoebe Snow lettering in the first photo.

Jack Mullen
(Note: the above content is humor related)


Re: Replacement medal wheel ssets

mrprksr <mrprksr@...>
 

Thanks for the input....I don't know about using 'award winning wheels'    just free rolling and in gauge....Thanks again.....Larry Mennie



________________________________
From: John Sykes <John.Sykes@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 8:45 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Replacement medal wheel ssets



 
I agree with Andy. I am a proponent of plastic side frames + metal axles and metal sideframes + plastic axles. I use the Reboxx reamer to open up the sideframes if they are a little tight.

So I use Intermountain wheelsets with Accurail, Athearn, Bowser, etc. trucks and Kadee or P2K wheelsets with Kadee or other metal trucks.

-- John

--- In STMFC@..., "Andrew Miller" <aslmmiller@...> wrote:

He wants to use award winning wheelset!



I recommend Intermountain. The work beautifully in Accurail or Bowser
truck frames.



Regards,



Andy Miller



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Hunter, James R.
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 12:03 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Replacement medal wheel ssets





medal?

Quoting Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...
<mailto:rhendrickson%40opendoor.com> >:

On Jul 29, 2013, at 7:07 PM, larry <mrprksr@...
<mailto:mrprksr%40bellsouth.net> > wrote:

I have several accurail cars I'm finally getting around to detailing
and I am finding that Kadee #520 wheels are kinda snug (the axle is
too long)...Question is what are you fellowa using in these
trucks.....Thanks.....Larry Mennie
Larry, Northwest Shot Line semi-scale wheel sets, my usual
replacement for code 110 wheel sets, roll very freely in Accurail
trucks.

Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Replacement medal wheel ssets

John
 

I agree with Andy. I am a proponent of plastic side frames + metal axles and metal sideframes + plastic axles. I use the Reboxx reamer to open up the sideframes if they are a little tight.

So I use Intermountain wheelsets with Accurail, Athearn, Bowser, etc. trucks and Kadee or P2K wheelsets with Kadee or other metal trucks.

-- John

--- In STMFC@..., "Andrew Miller" <aslmmiller@...> wrote:

He wants to use award winning wheelset!



I recommend Intermountain. The work beautifully in Accurail or Bowser
truck frames.



Regards,



Andy Miller



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Hunter, James R.
Sent: Tuesday, July 30, 2013 12:03 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Replacement medal wheel ssets





medal?

Quoting Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...
<mailto:rhendrickson%40opendoor.com> >:

On Jul 29, 2013, at 7:07 PM, larry <mrprksr@...
<mailto:mrprksr%40bellsouth.net> > wrote:

I have several accurail cars I'm finally getting around to detailing
and I am finding that Kadee #520 wheels are kinda snug (the axle is
too long)...Question is what are you fellowa using in these
trucks.....Thanks.....Larry Mennie
Larry, Northwest Shot Line semi-scale wheel sets, my usual
replacement for code 110 wheel sets, roll very freely in Accurail
trucks.

Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Storing paint (was Re: My first airbrush )

Dick Harley
 

Last weekend's discussion of air brushes devolved into a discussion of how long Floquil paint will remain liquid in the jar. A simple way to store model paints without them evaporating is to store the jars upside down. This has two immediate advantages: 1) the heavier materials settle to the bottom and seal the lid, keeping the lighter volatiles trapped inside the glass jar, and 2) when you unscrew the lid, you can tell if all the pigment has been mixed back into the paint.

I have some square bottles of Floquil that are still liquid and must be close to 50 years old. I don't use it much, obviously.

This trick is not quite as useful for polyethylene bottles, since the polyethylene itself is a bit porous.

Another trick is to put a splash of paint on the bottom of the bottle, so you can easily see what the color is by looking at the ends of the bottles - assuming you store the bottles upside down in a drawer or similar container.


Cheers,
Dick Harley
Laguna Beach, CA


Re: DT&I 16000-16199 and 16200-16263

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "soolinehistory" <destorzek@...> wrote:


It's THAT uncommon. The Soo Line had a series of forty eight 50' steel cars built in 1936 (and pictured in the 1940 CBC, IIRC). As built, they had six foot wide doors, when rebuilt in the fifties with 8' doors, only one door post was moved, so the doors were slightly off center.

Dennis
Where'd the NOT go? I meant to say its NOT that uncommon...

Dennis


Re: True Line 8 hatch reefers.

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

I stand corrected.
100 were built in '55 for the GTW.
Life lesson, check multiple sources.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "brian" <brianleppert@...> wrote:

Pierre, they were built in 1955. See Jan. 1996 RMC.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV

--- In STMFC@..., "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@> wrote:

Well there's a giant leap of faith if I ever saw one.
Just because TLT had them painted, doesn't mean they are correct.
In fact I just had a quick look in my 53 ORER and it shows no 40' overhead bunker reefers for GTW. IN fact it shows no 40' reefers at all.
I welcome any correction of my reading of the ORER.
Pierre Oliver


Re: True Line 8 hatch reefers.

midrly
 

It did, but those not pre-ordered appear to have flown off the shelves quickly. I lucked out to get one, but had to backdate the herald from the script lettering to "stepped". The model is of a specific 1954 200-car order from National Steel Car with "NSC-2" ends.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Bill" <wpmccoy@...> wrote:

One of the road names offered on the CN type 8 hatch reefer was GTW so they must have had a significant presence in Michigan.

On the subject of True Line 8 hatch cars, did the CP plug door version ever make it to market?

Bill McCoy
Jax, FL


Re: DT&I 16000-16199 and 16200-16263

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "r_eric_lombard" <elombard@...> wrote:

4. Of random interest... know of any other box car series with asymmetrical side patterns?

Thanks in advance!
Eric
It's THAT uncommon. The Soo Line had a series of forty eight 50' steel cars built in 1936 (and pictured in the 1940 CBC, IIRC). As built, they had six foot wide doors, when rebuilt in the fifties with 8' doors, only one door post was moved, so the doors were slightly off center.

Dennis


Re: True Line 8 hatch reefers.

brianleppert@att.net
 

Pierre, they were built in 1955. See Jan. 1996 RMC.

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV

--- In STMFC@..., "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:

Well there's a giant leap of faith if I ever saw one.
Just because TLT had them painted, doesn't mean they are correct.
In fact I just had a quick look in my 53 ORER and it shows no 40' overhead bunker reefers for GTW. IN fact it shows no 40' reefers at all.
I welcome any correction of my reading of the ORER.
Pierre Oliver


Re: Color for Bangor and Aroostook box car

Ken Roth
 

Thanks Al! That will work. Mine won't be newly painted.

Ken Roth

--- In STMFC@..., "al_brown03" <abrown@...> wrote:

Forgot to say if I were modelling one of these cars in service, I'd just paint it Floquil BCR and weather from there. The photos show several subtly different shades of weathered paint.

AL B.

--- In STMFC@..., "al_brown03" <abrown@> wrote:

Most of the photos in Sweetland and Horsley, "Northern New England Color Guide to Freight and Passenger Equipment", pp 9-15, suggest that the color is a mainstream BCR. I could be convinced that newly-painted cars had an Oxide tinge.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@..., "krowth3249" <kenwroth@> wrote:

I'm wondering if anyone knows the shade of boxcar red used by the B&A. I would love a mix based on Floquil or Scalecoat, but at least I would like to know if it leaned towards the Oxide Red, or Brown end of the spectrum, or was basically in the middle of the range.

Thanks,
Ken Roth


Re: Canadian 8-hatch reefers

Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

Thank you to all who responded,

Don Valentine


MILW rib side dd boxcar color

Brad Andonian
 

Gents,

Back again... AS I wish to get these cars done right, please advise the paint color/shade to use.

Brass is prepped and ready to paint!

Thank you,
Brad Andonian


Re: True Line 8 hatch reefers.

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Well there's a giant leap of faith if I ever saw one.
Just because TLT had them painted, doesn't mean they are correct.
In fact I just had a quick look in my 53 ORER and it shows no 40' overhead bunker reefers for GTW. IN fact it shows no 40' reefers at all.
I welcome any correction of my reading of the ORER.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "Bill" <wpmccoy@...> wrote:

One of the road names offered on the CN type 8 hatch reefer was GTW so they must have had a significant presence in Michigan.

On the subject of True Line 8 hatch cars, did the CP plug door version ever make it to market?

Bill McCoy
Jax, FL


DT&I 16000-16199 and 16200-16263

Eric Lombard
 

In 1953, 200 ATSF 50' cars rebuilt '36-'38 were renumbered out of several series to DT&I 16000-16199. For the DT&I cars, the ORER indicates IH = 11-8 until 1956, then IH = 10-3 as the ATSF-installed roof extensions were removed. Photos of cars as early as 1955 show this height reduction.

64 cars were RENO to DT&I 16200-16263 as rebuilt to IH 10-3 in 1956. The 1957 DT&I equipment diagram (page 7-12) for these cars indicates in Note 2: "car sides are not symmetrical - in that doors on left side are closer to car CL by 3'-0 1/2"." The diagram clearly shows the asymmetry. The effect is to shift the door opening one side sheet to the right on the left side of the car resulting in a different side sheet pattern on the right and left sides (colons represent rivets on sheet seams):
right | : : : [ | ] : : : : : : |
left | : : : : [ | ] : : : : : |
Published photos show both side sheet patterns (and drove me nuts until I found the small print in the diagram).

Some help from the group with the following would be most welcome:

1. All published photos I have seen of the cars in their ATSF years show the side sheet pattern indicated for the right side above suggesting (probabilistically) that the asymmetry is unique to the DT&I. Is there evidence to the contrary?

2. Were the 64 cars in DT&I 16200-16263 the only rebuilds with the asymmetry? Or, were some or all cars still in 16000-16199 also rebuilt to asymmetrical side patterns when the IH was lowered for 11-8 to 10-3?

3. All copies of the 1957 DT&I equipment diagram book available to me are missing page 7-11 for the series 16000-16199. I would be grateful if someone could provide me with a copy of this page (or better a pdf of a complete DT&I equipment diagram book for the late 1950s or early 1960s.

4. Of random interest... know of any other box car series with asymmetrical side patterns?

Thanks in advance!
Eric


Re: DL&W 46155 gets a load of bagged limestone 1957 (UNCLASSIFIED)

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., "soolinehistory" <destorzek@...> wrote:
Well, I can answer that. My Dad (who worked for a lumber yard during the thirties) told me how they dealt with doors that were jammed because the load had shifted against them... They'd back a truck up to the door, perpendicular to the track, wedge the hooks of a couple chains behind the edges of the door, and hook the chains to the truck. Then they'd drive straight away from the car; when the slack ran out, the door popped off the side of the car. When they'd finished unloading, they'd throw the door into the empty car for the railroad to deal with.

I had the misfortune to unload a 40 ft PS1 box car full of bags of charcoal on the hottest day in the summer. My employer opened the stuck door by wedging a 2X4 between the edge on the door and the grill of his truck and pushing with the truck. They must have used a similar movement to close the door.

Coming home on the bus my face was blacked with charcoal dust and pigment which came off of the bags.

THey'd be in trouble if the door came off. It took over a week to unload the box car.


True Line 8 hatch reefers.

Bill McCoy
 

One of the road names offered on the CN type 8 hatch reefer was GTW so they must have had a significant presence in Michigan.

On the subject of True Line 8 hatch cars, did the CP plug door version ever make it to market?

Bill McCoy
Jax, FL

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