Date   

Re: [CofGmodeler] HO Reading/NE Caboose Model?

Benjamin Hom
 

John Degnan asked:
"Anyone know if anyone besides Bachmann make a HO model of the style of Reading/NE Steel Caboose seen below?
http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/160-16806
   
Todd Horton replied:
"Life Like / Walthers Proto200 makes a nice model
http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/920-54829
 
Several models have been produced in HO scale of the Northeastern steel caboose over the years.  Before the P2K model, Life-Like cranked out tens of thousands trainset-quality models:
http://www.ho-scaletrains.net/lifelikefreightcars/id33.html
 
Lindberg also offered a model, later marketed by Mantua in their "Heavies" line and still available from Model Power ("Mantua Classics"):
http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r132/tonycook1966/Lindberg/02_Lindberg.jpg
http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r132/tonycook1966/Lindberg/03_Lindberg.jpg
http://www.modelpower.com/SearchResults.asp?Cat=76 
 
Eastern Car Works had a decent kit for this car, including different ends to model variations.  Some modelers had complaints about the roof curvature, so YMMV.
 
 
Ben Hom

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [CofGmodeler] HO Reading/NE Caboose Model?

Todd Horton
 

Life Like / Walthers Proto200 makes a nice model

http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/920-54829

Todd Horton


________________________________
From: "Scaler164@..." <Scaler164@...>
To: "Group, POST :" <STMFC@...>; "Group, POST :" <RPM-forum@...>; "Group, POST :" <SOUTHERNmodeler@...>; "Group, POST :" <CofGmodeler@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 8, 2013 12:47 AM
Subject: [CofGmodeler] HO Reading/NE Caboose Model?



 

Anyone know if anyone besides Bachmann make a HO model of the style of Reading/NE Steel Caboose seen below? :
 
     http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/160-16806
 

John Degnan
Scaler164@...
Scaler187@...



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Looking for a Short Line

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...>
 

<<I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era).>>

John

I think you might have some slightly conflicting requirements here. I'd like first to try and address some of the particular differences you will need to note when modeling the period rather than suggesting a specific line.

I have been working on a depression era setting for several years and, simply put, you will need to get really familiar with kit-bashing and resin kits to get a decent balance to really capture the look of 1930s trains.

If you look at images from the 'thirties the overall look of trains could be very different to what you see in post war shots. When thinking about just plain old boxcars you will notice proportionally greater number of shorter cars, of truss rod cars, more wooden sided boxcars both single and double sheathed, and the average height of cars tends to be a few inches lower; steel cars are relatively uncommon until later in the decade. This may not sound significant but it does make a noticeable difference to the overall look of a train when seen as a whole rather than as a collection of cars.

While in HO there is a good number of suitable freightcar subjects that have been kitted in plastic, most layouts might only need one or two of any single type and possible none of many others. This leaves a lot of gaps which need to be filled in with resin, kit bashing and scratching.

40' boxcars were becoming the usual way of moving general freight, but 36' cars were still to be found in enormous (though declining) numbers. 50' boxcars were vary rare birds expect perhaps on some Western roads and even then not terribly common.

Covered hoppers were a rarity at this time; bulk freight that could get wet moved in open hoppers or gondolas, almost anything else which would nowadays be shipped in covered hoppers traveled in boxcars, either bulk loaded (e.g. grain) or in sacks.

Milk cars are perhaps more associated with large towns and cities; most local milk traffic still was still handled in churns.

I think we need to get you to tell us a little more about what you have in mind; what scale do you favour, do you want to use available RTR steam or happy to buy brass?

What is you personal threshold for "good enough"? With the loss of so many of these lines and usually almost all their records over the years, you will have to face up to the fact that sooner or later you'll need to make something up to cover a gap in the record or in waha you can buy or build in a single lifetime.

That said I should answer the question of what lines push the right buttons for me? Assuming you want something more than just "mixed-train daily" operations then could I offer up these few for consideration? None will push all the buttons, but each had a unique character.

San Diego and Arizona Eastern - heavy SP influence in both locos and rolling stock though nothing bigger than consolidations and ten-wheelers; passenger trains included through Pullman cars off the SP/Rock Island. Much of the line still survives and some is still in use. Probably the easiest to model in HO if you can run to second hand brass SP consolidations, as a reasonably representative range of freight cars can be put together using resin kits - Harriman stock cars and doubel sheathed boxcars from Westerfield, some more SP style single sheathed boxcars cars are /were available from Sunshine and Walthers C30-1cabooses - you will lots of foreign road cars to round things off as SD&AE didn't own a lot of cars

Georgia and Florida; intended as trunk route it never really did what it's promoters hoped, but there was some through traffic combined with other operations in classic Georgia mixed train style . Buy or borrow a copy of Rails Through the Wiregrass. Might be tough to model really accurately without extensive kit bashing for locomotives, though the Spectrum ten wheelers woudl be a good basis for several engines. Some cars are/were available in resin from Sunshine and I think perhaps F&C.

Charleston and Western Carolina - owned by the ACL and a bit more solid than the G&F; another reasonably well documented line. Some steam available in HO though you will need to letter it( Spectrum's undecorated Russian decapods are very close to the C&WC appearance right out of the box) Many cars are basically ACL types.

Rutland and NYO&W have been mentioned.

Hope this helps with ideas

Aidrian


HO Reading/NE Caboose Model?

Scaler164@...
 

A nyone know if  anyone besides  Bachmann make a HO model of the style of  Reading/ NE Steel Caboose seen below ? :

     http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/160-16806


John Degnan
Scaler164@...
Scaler187@...


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Looking for a Short Line

benjamin
 

Hi John,
How about the Fordyce & Princeton in Arkansas?
It was founded in 1890 as a narrow gauge 9.4 mile line between Fordyce and Toan Arkansas.
In 1907 it was standard gauged with a 6 mile spur and a9 mile spur. It was a logging railroad that had a 3 truck Shay short log buggies and a Barnhart loader that moved from log buggy to log buggy when loading logs. This fed a huge steam driven lumber mill more than a mile long (with lots of whistles and pops) The other side of the mill was an outdoor lumber drying layout and a lot of Gerlinger lumber carriers. In the 50's it was known mostly for oak flooring and dimensional lumber. The lumber left the plant for interchange with the Cotton Belt and Rock Island (1.4 miles away, railroad at it's shortest)at the foot of downtown Fordyce. Loads were shipped out in about six box cars a day pulled by a 2-8-0 #101 know on display.
Rail logging was abandoned in the late 40's or early 50's and was replaced by trucks. Loads were small diameter logs and stacked 12 to 15 feet tall (real scarey to pass or follow).
This was when the motive power changed to a 45 ton side rod locomotive (Bockmann)to haul the boxcars through peoples back yards heading to the interchange. In 1963 Georgia Pacific. They totally rebuilt the mill int a plywood plant in steel building. An interesting aside is that the wigwam slash burner was finally dug up almost a year after it was no longer used. The fire pit was about 50 feet into the ground and still burning!
When Rock Island failed the railroad bought about 55 miles of line to interchange with AL&M and Cotton Belt. In 2004 the line was sold to Genesee and Wyoming. Train were then through hauled from UP (ex Cotton Belt an AL&M).
Locos ranged from gp28-1 to sw1500's and cf7's.

Unfortunately the railroad filed for abandonment in 2012 after 122 years of service.

Thanks
Ben Heinley
Denver Colorado


Re: Sunshine Mini-kits

 

Gene, Unfortunately I do not have the M-I triple hopper conversion mini-kit. I did buy the MoPac version. If you can not locate the M-I version, you could try and find Champ's HN-62 MP Road Name Set, which has the Missouri Illinois road name/rep marks.

I would be interested in buying some of your mini-kits if you are interested in selling them. 

Interested in 1 each, can pay with check or PayPal

T&P 1700-1724 Express Boxcars

C&O AAR Alternater Standard 2-Bay Hopper Modification Kits

Burlington 70 ton Covered hopper


Thanks,
Rich Christie


________________________________
From: Gene <mopac1@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, August 6, 2013 3:23 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Sunshine Mini-kits



 
I would like to obtain a number of Sunshine Mini-kits for the Missouri Illinois covered triple hopper consisting of roof, details, stainless steel brackets & decals. Listed as MK-12C on Jim Hayes all time list of Sunshine kits.

If of any interest, I do have the following mini-kits to trade for the Missouri Illinois mini-kits:

B&O M-27 Mod Kit (3 kits)
C&I and Montour Alternate AAR Hopper sides (2 kits)
T&P 1700-1724 Express Boxcars (3 kits)
EJ&E 1941 Aar 10'-6" Steel Boxcar with White Lettering
GM&O 1940 & 1943 ACF Boxcars with 10 rung ladder fixture
C&O AAR Alternater Standard 2-Bay Hopper Modification Kits (5 kits)
AT&SF Fe-22, 23 50' Rebuilt Boxcar with map
Burlington 70 ton Covered hopper
Decals – NKP Alternate Standard Hoppers

Contact me at gcsemon@... if you can help.

Gene Semon




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Re: Looking for a Short Line

tyesac@...
 

John,

Northern Arizona had at verious times some logging shortlines that interchanged with the Santa Fe around Flagstaff, so, depending on your timeframe, that gives you the option of having a shortline and a class 1 with lots of lumber/log trade.

Tom Casey

-----Original Message-----
From: Richard White <rhwhite@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wed, Aug 7, 2013 11:34 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Looking for a Short Line




Hi John,
You are getting a flood of advice - here is something a bit different.
Have you thought of a freelance railroad on which you run prototype cars? Then you can tailor your road to what you want.
I am slowly (very slowly - like a train gingerly moving along a very run-down shortline with weed-grown tracks) building the 'Wisconsin Western' inspired by an article on the Milwaukee Road's mineral Point Branch in 'Scale Trains' (a short-lived British model railway magazine) and my links with the Land Tenure Centre at the University of Wisconsin. Mostly populated with catalogue Baldwins and a variety of early low axle-load diesels.
The two volumes of 'Railroads you can model' and 'More railroads you can model' published by Kalmbach in 1976 and 1979 cover several of the branchlines, small class 1 roads and shortlines mentioned by other members in this thread.
Good luck and have fun
Richard White









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Looking for a Short Line

NickG <nick.gully@...>
 

Mr. Miller,
I'll throw a Colorado road into the mix: The Great Western Railway served the front range ambling between sugar beet factories through the plains from Longmont to (almost) Ft. Collins. A great deal of agriculture loading (beans, sugar beets) were handled on line as well as the great variety of loads that come and go from a Sugar Factory. New hoppers as well as old drop bottom gons were pressed into service during the harvesting rush. Several 2-8-0's and a 2-10-0 provided service, and a wide variety of cars showed up to distribute sacked sugar to the nation. Light track, numerous interchanges (CB&Q, C&S, UP) as well as a great backdrop of the continental divide.

Best Regards,
Nick Gully


Re: Looking for a Short Line

Steve H <nwicfan@...>
 

Hi John,

Like you I wanted to model a railroad that was uncommon, visually interesting but in New Mexico where I am originally from. I ended up with the El Paso & Southwestern at El Paso in 1919. Very interesting and a very cool railroad. So I understand full well what you are going through.

Before I recommend some interesting railroads I thought I would throw one at you that allows you to go out there and railfan because it is still there. It is the Utah Railway. Now I know that you might think of it as just a coal road, and it is, but from what I understand is that it shares trackage with the D&RGW into Provo. So there you go with your auto traffic, etc. Maybe some industrial switching as well.

Now here is the exciting part. Small locos: four 2-8-0s. medium locos: none. None????? I know that you wanted small and medium locos but the Utah Railway had some other steam locomotives that you might want to have.

Try this on for size. Nine 2-10-2s and three 2-8-8-0s. The best part is that those 12 engines are UP copies.

http://www.steamlocomotive.com/santafe/utah103-davis.jpg

Cabooses are easy too. Four of them are second hand that the railroad inherited but the other eight are UP CA-1 copies.

There were also 2,000 coal gons that were lettered "Utah Coal Route" which is some kind of joint venture with the Los Angeles & Salt Lake (UP subsidiary). This is the Red Caboose coal gon with UP details.

See here --> http://utahrails.net/utah-ry/utah-ry-index.php

So imagine modeling Soldier Summit (http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=soldier+summit+utah&qpvt=soldier+summit+utah&FORM=IGRE) with a Utah Ry 2-8-8-0 straining up the hill with a unit coal train while a D&RGW passenger train, such as the "Scenic Limited" or the "Panoramic" pulled by a 4-6-6-4, passes it by.

Everyone knows about the Utah Railway but they know it in today's version from six axle ALCOs to modern G&W power. But back in the 1930s you had, in my opinion, something much more interesting. And with the Utah Ry being so well known you are going to have a lot of research information being available.

So if you go this route I can picture you telling someone that you model the Utah Railway and you don't have to explain where it is and what it does. Then when you tell them about the 2-10-2s and 2-8-8-0s which are UP copies then you are pretty much guaranteed a "wow" factor. And to be honest, I don't think that it had large yards but a lot of sidings which make modeling them that much easier. On the other hand you have the joint trackage with the D&RGW into Provo. So you can pretty much find something that you like.

Here are some links to photos from the Denver library of motive power you could see on a Utah Railway layout with some Rio Grande thrown into the mix:

UTAH RAILWAY
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/65491/rec/221
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/65492/rec/222
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/65493/rec/223

D&RGW
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/48797/rec/37
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/48757/rec/43
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/48850/rec/68
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/48927/rec/69
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/49145/rec/71
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/48988/rec/76
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/48997/rec/77
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/49231/rec/78
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/48893/rec/61
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/52835/rec/113
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/52841/rec/116
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/53405/rec/130
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/53417/rec/133
http://cdm16079.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p15330coll22/id/53419/rec/134

(I know that there are more Rio Grande photos in this e-mail but that is what I can come up with right away)

BTW, the Utah Ry ran a McKeen motor car up until 1919. So you probably can include that if you want too.

If this is not what you are looking for then I can throw some more 1930s railroads at you but please give me a list of three must haves for your railroad.

- Steve Hedlund, Everett WA


________________________________
From: John Miller <amwing1588@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, August 5, 2013 6:59 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Looking for a Short Line


 

Hi all,

I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one of a major line)along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of interchange cars along it's line and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines across the country, and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why. At this point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly.

Thanks to all in advance.

John Miller
Folsom, CA.




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Looking for a Short Line

albyrno
 

This sounds like a candidate it had logging operations extending into Oregon and being connection between major railways and several smaller ones it should meet most of your criteria,
I beleive the CB&Q was also invloved
The Spokane, Portland and Seattle Railway (SP&S) (reporting mark SPS) was a United States-based railroad incorporated in 1905. It was a joint venture by theGreat Northern Railway and the Northern Pacific Railway to build a railroad along the north bank of the Columbia River.
 Alan


________________________________
From: Richard White <rhwhite@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, August 7, 2013 9:34 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Looking for a Short Line



 
Hi John,
You are getting a flood of advice - here is something a bit different.
Have you thought of a freelance railroad on which you run prototype cars? Then you can tailor your road to what you want.
I am slowly (very slowly - like a train gingerly moving along a very run-down shortline with weed-grown tracks) building the 'Wisconsin Western' inspired by an article on the Milwaukee Road's mineral Point Branch in 'Scale Trains' (a short-lived British model railway magazine) and my links with the Land Tenure Centre at the University of Wisconsin. Mostly populated with catalogue Baldwins and a variety of early low axle-load diesels.
The two volumes of 'Railroads you can model' and 'More railroads you can model' published by Kalmbach in 1976 and 1979 cover several of the branchlines, small class 1 roads and shortlines mentioned by other members in this thread.
Good luck and have fun
Richard White

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Looking for a Short Line

Tim O'Connor
 

Milk can be represented by a few milk cans. For example, one
doesn't normally think of the Great Northern when they think of
milk, but I know some of the GN branches in North Dakota moved
milk as LCL freight. I suspect milk was a common LCL cargo all
over the country.

GN would be a good "major" to look into, with its extensive
number of branch and secondary lines in the Dakotas and Minnesota,
vast amounts of documentation from books and the GNHS and a very
good web site. A lot of small GN steam has been produced too,
although most of it is brass.

Tim O'

The covered hoppers and 50' auto boxes are a challenge for most 1930's short
lines, let alone ones with milk and logging. The milk, logging and multiple
small loco's (including multiple types) can be covered by the Montpelier and
Wells River or the St. Johnsbury and Lamoille County for a couple in New
England.

Don Burn


Re: Looking for a Short Line

Richard White
 

Hi John,
You are getting a flood of advice - here is something a bit different.
Have you thought of a freelance railroad on which you run prototype cars? Then you can tailor your road to what you want.
I am slowly (very slowly - like a train gingerly moving along a very run-down shortline with weed-grown tracks) building the 'Wisconsin Western' inspired by an article on the Milwaukee Road's mineral Point Branch in 'Scale Trains' (a short-lived British model railway magazine) and my links with the Land Tenure Centre at the University of Wisconsin. Mostly populated with catalogue Baldwins and a variety of early low axle-load diesels.
The two volumes of 'Railroads you can model' and 'More railroads you can model' published by Kalmbach in 1976 and 1979 cover several of the branchlines, small class 1 roads and shortlines mentioned by other members in this thread.
Good luck and have fun
Richard White


Re: Looking for a Short Line

rwitt_2000
 

Tony Thompson wrote:

... if you take this list literally, there is a real problem because
there effectively WEREN'T covered hoppers in the early to mid 1930s."

It depends upon the railroad and the location. By 1935 the B&O already
had over 100 covered hoppers, class N-25, converted from class N-13
open-top hoppers. Unfortunately it appears that most were assign to
cement service providing cement to many construction projects (dams) in
Pennsylvania.
In this period most covered hoppers were in assigned service so if the
proposed short line had such a customer as a destination one could
justified a few covered hoppers. The same ones making the trip. Covered
hoppers in "pool service" came much later at least on the B&O.
Bob Witt


Re: Looking for a Short Line

Bill Schneider
 

Craig Zeni has mentioned it already, but I’ll second it – the NYO&W.

1) early to mid 1930s - The highest level of traffic was in this time
period.

2) researchable through visits, photos, books - Check, plus an active
historical society with a full set of track maps from the 1920s available
and more. Much of the ROW is now hiking trails, but is accessible.

3) move "a lot" of interchange - Bridge traffic from Scranton and Oswego to
Maybrook, NY. Interchanges with the NYC, D&H, NH, L&NE, L&HR and others.
Check.

4) milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers, 50' auto boxes... Milk cars - you
bet. Lots of them. Log cars - would wood flats count (used for servicing the
wood chemical industry)? Covered hoppers - sure, though probably later than
the early 1930s. 50' auto cars - on the through freights.

5) "lots of small to medium steamers" - Never had anything but, at least by
most standards... :>)

Bill Schneider
http://home.comcast.net/~oandw/


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Don
Burn
Sent: Wednesday, August 7, 2013 11:02 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Looking for a Short Line

 
The covered hoppers and 50' auto boxes are a challenge for most 1930's short
lines, let alone ones with milk and logging. The milk, logging and multiple
small loco's (including multiple types) can be covered by the Montpelier and
Wells River or the St. Johnsbury and Lamoille County for a couple in New
England.

Don Burn

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Bruce F. Smith
Sent: Wednesday, August 07, 2013 10:24 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Looking for a Short Line

Folks,

I don't want to be "snarky" but the request by John Miller had some specific
requirements. We can sit here for months and name shortlines and branches
that were "cool" for so many reasons but that doesn't address the original
request and I have no idea what purpose that serves. Frankly, some of the
suggestions haven't even come close! Maybe if you addressed John's
"druthers" it might help?

1) early to mid 1930s
2) researchable through visits, photos, books
3) move "a lot" of interchange
4) milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers, 50' auto boxes... (I'm not sure if
John meant this to be a list of required car types or more that he wanted
variety in the car types seen)
5) "lots of small to medium steamers" (so one or two won't cut it and much
as I like overhead wires, electrics won't cut it....)

I'll note that John seemed to want an independent short line, but then
backed off that saying it could be a "major". That is a relief since there
are few independent short lines that would meet all of John's requirements.

I would also suggest to John that he needs to clarify what he is looking for
in his model railroad. That is, what types of operation? How many trains?
How many operators? Many of these questions are more suited for discussion
on the opsig and layout design sig lists/web pages, but are integral in
driving the requirements for this layout.

Regards

Bruce

Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Looking for a Short Line

Clark Propst
 

Not sure if it's practical to base a layout around a freight car roster. For me, top priority is finding something appealing that fits my space.
Clark Propst


Re: Looking for a Short Line

Tony Thompson
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
I don't want to be "snarky" but the request by John Miller had some specific requirements. We can sit here for months and name shortlines and branches that were "cool" for so many reasons but that doesn't address the original request and I have no idea what purpose that serves. Frankly, some of the suggestions haven't even come close! Maybe if you addressed John's "druthers" it might help?

1) early to mid 1930s
2) researchable through visits, photos, books
3) move "a lot" of interchange
4) milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers, 50' auto boxes... (I'm not sure if John meant this to be a list of required car types or more that he wanted variety in the car types seen)
Very well said, Bruce, but we do need to apply some imagination here. As I already pointed out, if you take this list literally, there is a real problem because there effectively WEREN'T covered hoppers in the early to mid 1930s. So people have been doing a segue to alternatives. But of course Bruce is right, they have wandered farther and farther from the original "druthers."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Looking for a Short Line

Don Burn
 

The covered hoppers and 50' auto boxes are a challenge for most 1930's short
lines, let alone ones with milk and logging. The milk, logging and multiple
small loco's (including multiple types) can be covered by the Montpelier and
Wells River or the St. Johnsbury and Lamoille County for a couple in New
England.

Don Burn

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Bruce F. Smith
Sent: Wednesday, August 07, 2013 10:24 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Looking for a Short Line

Folks,

I don't want to be "snarky" but the request by John Miller had some specific
requirements. We can sit here for months and name shortlines and branches
that were "cool" for so many reasons but that doesn't address the original
request and I have no idea what purpose that serves. Frankly, some of the
suggestions haven't even come close! Maybe if you addressed John's
"druthers" it might help?

1) early to mid 1930s
2) researchable through visits, photos, books
3) move "a lot" of interchange
4) milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers, 50' auto boxes... (I'm not sure if
John meant this to be a list of required car types or more that he wanted
variety in the car types seen)
5) "lots of small to medium steamers" (so one or two won't cut it and much
as I like overhead wires, electrics won't cut it....)

I'll note that John seemed to want an independent short line, but then
backed off that saying it could be a "major". That is a relief since there
are few independent short lines that would meet all of John's requirements.

I would also suggest to John that he needs to clarify what he is looking for
in his model railroad. That is, what types of operation? How many trains?
How many operators? Many of these questions are more suited for discussion
on the opsig and layout design sig lists/web pages, but are integral in
driving the requirements for this layout.


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."







------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Looking for a Short Line

Charles Morrill
 

Well if the "majors" are not excluded, then the T&NO branch lines in Texas and Louisiana would fit all those "druthers".
Charlie

-----Original Message-----
From: Bruce F. Smith
Sent: Wednesday, August 07, 2013 9:24 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Looking for a Short Line

Folks,

I don't want to be "snarky" but the request by John Miller had some specific requirements. We can sit here for months and name shortlines and branches that were "cool" for so many reasons but that doesn't address the original request and I have no idea what purpose that serves. Frankly, some of the suggestions haven't even come close! Maybe if you addressed John's "druthers" it might help?

1) early to mid 1930s
2) researchable through visits, photos, books
3) move "a lot" of interchange
4) milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers, 50' auto boxes... (I'm not sure if John meant this to be a list of required car types or more that he wanted variety in the car types seen)
5) "lots of small to medium steamers" (so one or two won't cut it and much as I like overhead wires, electrics won't cut it....)

I'll note that John seemed to want an independent short line, but then backed off that saying it could be a "major". That is a relief since there are few independent short lines that would meet all of John's requirements.

I would also suggest to John that he needs to clarify what he is looking for in his model railroad. That is, what types of operation? How many trains? How many operators? Many of these questions are more suited for discussion on the opsig and layout design sig lists/web pages, but are integral in driving the requirements for this layout.


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."







------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Looking for a Short Line

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

I don't want to be "snarky" but the request by John Miller had some specific requirements. We can sit here for months and name shortlines and branches that were "cool" for so many reasons but that doesn't address the original request and I have no idea what purpose that serves. Frankly, some of the suggestions haven't even come close! Maybe if you addressed John's "druthers" it might help?

1) early to mid 1930s
2) researchable through visits, photos, books
3) move "a lot" of interchange
4) milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers, 50' auto boxes... (I'm not sure if John meant this to be a list of required car types or more that he wanted variety in the car types seen)
5) "lots of small to medium steamers" (so one or two won't cut it and much as I like overhead wires, electrics won't cut it....)

I'll note that John seemed to want an independent short line, but then backed off that saying it could be a "major". That is a relief since there are few independent short lines that would meet all of John's requirements.

I would also suggest to John that he needs to clarify what he is looking for in his model railroad. That is, what types of operation? How many trains? How many operators? Many of these questions are more suited for discussion on the opsig and layout design sig lists/web pages, but are integral in driving the requirements for this layout.


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."


Re: Looking for a Short Line

Dean Payne
 

The Wheeling and Lake Erie has the following to recommend it:

TWO books, written by John B. Corns, with photos etc., for your research pleasure. Also, the Nickel Plate Historical and Technical Society is a source of information.
The location in Ohio is near auto manufacturing plants, so auto cars are possible (but not common, probably). The nearby Nickel Plate got its first 50' auto cars in 1936, IIRC, so it's possible that one could
The Wheeling got its first covered hoppers in 1937, and are available from Funaro in resin. I don't know how much you want to keep this in the mid-30's, you might be willing to bend it to the mid-late 30's.
Much of the Wheeling's rolling stock was coal hoppers, similar to GLa twins and H21 quads (some kitbashing is needed to make these more accurate), and they got some Alternate Standard offset hoppers starting in 1936. They had a lot of gons, slightly more than the number of hoppers. Your best bets for modeling are the IM USRA composite gons, and the Walthers USRA mill gons, or kitbash the Accurail gons by adding plate ends. They hauled a lot of pipe out of the pipe mill in Lorain. For boxcars, the Red Caboose X29 (ARA) box car is accurate. For cabooses... you'd have to kitbash the Roundhouse wood caboose (turn to the NKPHTS Magazine article for two variations of this kitbash).
For steamers, the Bachmann 2-8-0, BLI Heavy Mikado, Bachmann 2-6-6-2, and Proto USRA 0-8-0 and 0-6-0 are available.
I model the W&LE in the late 30's. It might be a bit large for a "short line", but I think it has enough interchange that it might work for you.

Dean Payne

--- In STMFC@..., "John Miller" <amwing1588@...> wrote:

Hi all,

I don't know if this is the correct venue to ask this, but I will anyway. I need help in discovering a short line RR set in the early to mid 1930's (depression era). I would like to be able to research it through visits, photo's and books and then build a layout and fill it with the correct types of rolling stock appropriate for that time period.
The short line I'm interested in modeling would have had it's own road name (or even one of a major line)along with it's own rolling stock, but would also move a lot of interchange cars along it's line and might include rolling stock...from milk cars, log cars, covered hoppers to 50' auto boxes and Oh ya...lots of small to medium steamers. I've been modeling the larger mainline roads for years, but just find myself yearning for something special. There are so many of these branch lines/short lines across the country, and that being said, I'd like to hear from you all, which ones you like and why. At this point, I don't have a geographical preference, so let the suggestions fly.

Thanks to all in advance.

John Miller
Folsom, CA.

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