Date   

Re: Kadee Bracket Grab attachment

randy arnold
 

I believe the bracket grabs are supposed to be a press fir into a
.020" hole, no glue is necessary. The grab has a square section that
is deformed when it is pressed into the hole.

Here is a section of a message:

-----Original Message-----
From: soolinehistory <destorzek@... <mailto:destorzek%40mchsi.com>; >
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>; >
Sent: Sat, Oct 22, 2011 8:49 am
Subject: [STMFC] Kadee Bracket Grab Iron Hole Locations

As Promised, I have surveyed the mounting holes on a Kadee PS-1 body and
have uploaded dimensioned sketches to the FILES section at:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/files/Kadee_PS-1_Grab_Iron_Holes/

All dimensions are decimal inches, to four places where necessary. The
ordinate dimensions are relative to the center of the grab iron; it is up to
whoever develops a drilling jig to properly relate them to other features on
the car body.

The first sheet also shows the typical condition at the mounting pin / hole
interface. Whoever devised the old joke about putting a square peg in a
round hole obviously didn't design plastic parts, because that is exactly
what Kadee has done. The mounting pegs are .017" squares with a long tapered
lead; they are designed to be pressed into .020" diameter holes. A look at
the drawing shows that this combination yields appx. .002" of interference
at the corners of the peg, while the unfilled portions of the hole provide a
place for the displaced material.This is good design practice, but it does
point out that the grabs must be properly oriented before they are pressed
in place; ones the corners dig into the circumference of the hole, it will
be either difficult or impossible to twist them straight. If this is a
problem, the holes can be increased to .024" diameter, and CA used to fill
the gaps and lock the mounting peg in place.
--
Best Regards
Randy


Re: Kadee Bracket Grab attachment

John
 

Bill:

I've had not problem with the press-fit Kadee grabs, but would use the two-part Locktite if I did drill the holes too big. That stuff holds great!

-- John

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...> wrote:

Hi Bill,

I've done these with a press fit plus super-glue. All are still in place.

So long,

Andy


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


DMIR

Norm Buckhart
 

I am drawing the medallion for decals for Protocraft - I have a few photos where the medallion is just white lines and letters on a car side. But I also have a photo of DMIR 3173 that clearly has the inner and outer circle in two different solid colors with white lettering on top.

Anyone have any knowledge of what the colors could be?

any help would be appreciated

Norm Buckhart


Re: bulkhead flatcar loads

water.kresse@...
 

If like the C&O bulkhead flat cars of the era, they had a locker nested into the bulkhead structure to carry tarps and tie-downs. 



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----


From: cwilson@journey.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, August 10, 2013 11:20:13 AM
Subject: [STMFC] bulkhead flatcar loads

I have one of the Intermountain B&O bulkhead flatcars.  The reweigh date is "WA 3-65" and has a routing stencil "WHEN EMPTY RETURN TO B&O RR SHOALS IND" supposedly for wallboard loading.  The car has a 1951 built date and I can change the reweigh date to run it in the STMFC era as long as I know it would have had the bulkheads then.

I am looking to build a load for the car and "wallboard" can mean a lot of different things.  I did some searching and found Shoals, Indiana southwest of Indianapolis.  There is a long spur leading to a large National Gypsum plant  (There is a US Gypsum plant in the area too but does not appear to be rail served).  This points me toward gypsum wallboard (also called "sheetrock") as the load.  I have been told that gypsum wallboard started to be widely used as a replacement for "plaster and lathe" following WW2.

So what would a load of gypsum wallboard have looked like in this era?  It would have to be somehow protected from the elements on a flatcar.  I have been told that the for lumber the bundles wrapped with plastic sheets was not commonplace until the 1970's.  Would the loads have been "tarped" with the old heavy canvas covers? Or some other method?

Any insights are appreciated.  I am waiting on the arrival of an Espee Models SP bulkhead flatcar (converted in the late 1950's) that was also assigned to wallboard loading.

Craig Wilson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


36-ft & 50-ft Boxcars

Bill Welch
 

My earlier post got me to thinking about my own count of 36-ft & 50-
ft Boxcars. Most of my built models are in padded storage boxes so I
have to rely on my memory, plus looking at the kits on the shelf but
here is what I have built so far or anticipate building. Just a gut
check to see how I am doing with my goal to have the two groups
roughly match.

36-Footers Built & Anticipate Building

2 ACL vents [Sunshine and Con-Cor]; 1 C&WC [Sunshine]; 2 SAL vents
[Wright Trak[]; 2 NC&StL Fowlers [Westerfield]; 2 Canadian Fowlers (I
think one CP and one CN)[Westerfield & Speedwitch]; 1 MP [Sunshine];
2 L&N [F&C kitbash & Sunshine], 1 NC&StL steel rebuild [Sunshine]; 1
ITC [Sunshine]; 1 Rutland [F&C]; 3 Southern [Westerfield & F&C]; 1
L&C [Westerfield w/herald King decals] = 19 cars

Conclusion: I will keep my eyes on F&C for another northeastern
prototype or two plus maybe another Southern SU built as an A&D car

50-Footers Built & Anticipate Building

2 CB&Q [Sunshine & Speedwitch]; 1 NP [Speedwitch]; 1 KCS [Proto
2000]; 1 Wabash [Proto 2000 w/Sunshine conversion parts]; 1 UP
[Westerfield]; 1 GN [Westerfield]; 1 TN&O [F&C]; 1 WP [MDC]; 1 SL-SF
[MDC kitbash]; 1 MP [MDC kitbash]; 1 T&P [MDC kitbash]; 1 D&RGW
[patterns in progress for kit]; 1 L&N [patterns if I live long
enough]; 1 MILW [Sunshine]; 1 ATSF [Sunshine]; 2 N&W [F&C and
Shenandoah]; 1 Virginian [F&C]; 1 PRR [F&C] = 19 cars

Conclusion: Given my time period I can justify more 50-ft cars than
36-ft cars. There are only six steel cars in the above group and I
have several Proto 2000 undecs around and some Front Range and a few
factory painted Branchline. Would like to find a Speedwitch CofG. I
wish someone would do the 50-ft cars built before WWII w/6-ft doors.

I have to admit my surprise that the count of built and anticipate
building is even. Also in looking at the two groups of models it is
impressive how many prototypes can be modeled.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727-470-9930
fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com


Re: Kadee Bracket Grab attachment

Andy Sperandeo
 

Hi Bill,

I've done these with a press fit plus super-glue. All are still in place.

So long,

Andy


bulkhead flatcar loads

cwilson@...
 

I have one of the Intermountain B&O bulkhead flatcars. The reweigh date is "WA 3-65" and has a routing stencil "WHEN EMPTY RETURN TO B&O RR SHOALS IND" supposedly for wallboard loading. The car has a 1951 built date and I can change the reweigh date to run it in the STMFC era as long as I know it would have had the bulkheads then.

I am looking to build a load for the car and "wallboard" can mean a lot of different things. I did some searching and found Shoals, Indiana southwest of Indianapolis. There is a long spur leading to a large National Gypsum plant (There is a US Gypsum plant in the area too but does not appear to be rail served). This points me toward gypsum wallboard (also called "sheetrock") as the load. I have been told that gypsum wallboard started to be widely used as a replacement for "plaster and lathe" following WW2.

So what would a load of gypsum wallboard have looked like in this era? It would have to be somehow protected from the elements on a flatcar. I have been told that the for lumber the bundles wrapped with plastic sheets was not commonplace until the 1970's. Would the loads have been "tarped" with the old heavy canvas covers? Or some other method?

Any insights are appreciated. I am waiting on the arrival of an Espee Models SP bulkhead flatcar (converted in the late 1950's) that was also assigned to wallboard loading.

Craig Wilson


Kadee Bracket Grab attachment

Bill Welch
 

I have been building so many wood sheathed cars that I have never had
an opportunity to use Peter Aue's excellent Drill Template (available
from Yarmouth Model Works) for Kadee's beautiful bracket grabs. This
morning I used it to prepare a "Smoky Valley" (now the Wright Trak)
Tennessee Central steel boxcar. I carefully walked the hole size up
from #79 to #75 which is the size where if I press on the ends of the
bracket it looks like it will be a press fit, which of course is the
way these parts are designed to attached. Has anyone used this method
of attachment?

Engineering plastic as we know is hard to attach with most glues or
adhesives. I would consider using epoxy but the resin ends and sides
are thick, meaning there is not much of a pin exposed for the epoxy
to grab hold of. I could enlarge the hole slightly. I also have
someone's two-step adhesive--Loctite I think--designed for
engineering plastic that I have sort of been waiting for a moment
like this to try. I still need to enlarge the hole enough to allow
the adhesive to flow into it. (I never could get Cyanopoxy to work
for me.)

With the thinner styrene section of most steel car kits, I am
planning to melt the end of the attachment pin with a hot screw driver.

Anyway I am curious how others are attaching the Kadee grab parts.
Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930
fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com


Re: 36-foot boxcars

mopacfirst
 

And, the Newfoundland cars were conveniently narrow gauge.

Ron Merrick

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, caboose9792@... wrote:



In a message dated 8/9/2013 12:56:19 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
rtbsvrr69@... writes:

By the end of the steam era (1959) only 2% (15,137 total) of the cars were
shorties, and virtually all of those cars were either Dominion cars from
the Great White North, or Ya'all Road ventilated cars. I don't have ANY
ORERs from the 1960s, so I haven't tracked when the last cars of the type
stopped rolling.

Since Ray pondered the context of the demise of the 36' cars I had the 1965
register handy and did a quick check :

L&N XM 36' 3" 3 cars
2 ventilator boxes 40' 6"
total freight equipment 58,701 cars

C of G no boxcars under 40' but 14 86' 4" XAP

FEC shortest boxcar is 39' 10" IL 14 total "steel underframe" cars

Southern 17 36' boxcars of 23,717 [0.071%] total cars
186 stock cars 40' 6"

SCL no boxcars under 40'
ventilator cars 35' 9" 9 cars, 35'1 1 car
total 10 cars.
485 RB & RBL for comparison

ACL
xm 1 car (30 ton capacity)
VM (ventilator) 15 cars

De Queen and Eastern (in Arkansas)
1 36' XM
21 total cars

CP
156 boxcars (only one group class XAP of 17 cars appears to be an all
steel car) of 51577 in all classes [0.3%]
740 SM 36' stock cars 1679 total stock cars (new series with no quantity
data for about 100 new 40' 6" cars not included) [44%]

CN
419 cars [0.47%]
88,888 cars total

CN- Newfound land area
all cars are under 50' IL
XM XI 36' or less 767 [36.76%]
total cars 2086

Northern Alberta Railways 30 36' stock cars [100%]

It would seem that 36' box cars would be rare and getting rarer in 1960,
last year class 1 steam in the US. They proved to have more staying power in
Canada, particularly in Newfoundland. However, 36' stockcars seemed to have
held up better percentage wise.

Mark Rickert




Re: 36-foot boxcars

Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Aug 9, 2013, at 8:11 AM, lnbill <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I too appreciate F&C's efforts with 36-foot boxcars.

One of the stats I remember from John Nehrich's "Shop Talks" years ago was the number of boxcars of various lengths based on numbers from the ORER he consulted. I don't remember the exact year but I am pretty sure the reason it stuck with me is because it was a post-WWII year. About 84% of the national boxcar fleet were nominal 40-ft cars while the 36-ft and 50-ft boxcars were about the same, approximately 8% for each. I have tried to remember this ratio as I buy and build.
Bill, I wouldn't put too much stock in those numbers. Aging 36' box cars lasted longer on smaller and less prosperous railroads (and on Class 1 RRs like the Southern, which was still acquiring them in the late '20s) than on major transcontinental lines, and 50' cars were more numerous on the railroads that had a lot of automobile and auto parts traffic (e.g., NYC, Pennsy, Santa Fe, UP). So the ratio might vary a lot depending on the RR and location you're modeling. As always, interchange records, conductors' train books, and photos of actual trains are more useful than abstract numbers. In the area and era I model, I need many 50' cars, as the Santa Fe hauled large amounts of auto parts into the Los Angeles area and many finished autos and trucks out of it, but very few 36' cars, as the Santa Fe's had mostly been retired and most other western RRs (UP. SP, WP, GN, NP, MILW) had shifted from 36' to 40' box cars early in the 20th century. As always, YMMV, of course. No doubt 36' box cars were more numerous in the southeast than in the far west.

Richard Hendrickson


And in the northeast to a degree as well owing to the huge number of 36 ft. cars the New Haven owned and rebuilt. F&C now offers a great one piece resin casting kit for these cars with our choice of ends.

Additionally, Southern 36 ft. cars appear in the region from time to time along with ACL and Seaboard ventilated box cars, usually carrying watermelons.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: 36-foot boxcars

caboose9792@...
 

In a message dated 8/9/2013 12:56:19 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
rtbsvrr69@yahoo.com writes:

By the end of the steam era (1959) only 2% (15,137 total) of the cars were
shorties, and virtually all of those cars were either Dominion cars from
the Great White North, or Ya'all Road ventilated cars. I don't have ANY
ORERs from the 1960s, so I haven't tracked when the last cars of the type
stopped rolling.

Since Ray pondered the context of the demise of the 36' cars I had the 1965
register handy and did a quick check :

L&N XM 36' 3" 3 cars
2 ventilator boxes 40' 6"
total freight equipment 58,701 cars

C of G no boxcars under 40' but 14 86' 4" XAP

FEC shortest boxcar is 39' 10" IL 14 total "steel underframe" cars

Southern 17 36' boxcars of 23,717 [0.071%] total cars
186 stock cars 40' 6"

SCL no boxcars under 40'
ventilator cars 35' 9" 9 cars, 35'1 1 car
total 10 cars.
485 RB & RBL for comparison

ACL
xm 1 car (30 ton capacity)
VM (ventilator) 15 cars

De Queen and Eastern (in Arkansas)
1 36' XM
21 total cars

CP
156 boxcars (only one group class XAP of 17 cars appears to be an all
steel car) of 51577 in all classes [0.3%]
740 SM 36' stock cars 1679 total stock cars (new series with no quantity
data for about 100 new 40' 6" cars not included) [44%]

CN
419 cars [0.47%]
88,888 cars total

CN- Newfound land area
all cars are under 50' IL
XM XI 36' or less 767 [36.76%]
total cars 2086

Northern Alberta Railways 30 36' stock cars [100%]

It would seem that 36' box cars would be rare and getting rarer in 1960,
last year class 1 steam in the US. They proved to have more staying power in
Canada, particularly in Newfoundland. However, 36' stockcars seemed to have
held up better percentage wise.

Mark Rickert


Re: 36-foot boxcars

devansprr
 

Bill,

I realize you are looking at the post-war fleet, but during WWII there was significant under-40 boxcar fleet, even ignoring the massive CP/CN fleets.

Ignoring the CN/CP fleets, in 1943, the under-40 North American fleet outnumbered the 50 foot fleet 72,000 (9.5% under 40') to 48,000 (6.4% 50') (The total NA fleet, minus CN and CP, was around 750,000)

Roads that had more under-40's than 40' or over (with number of under-40's noted):

L&N - 7753
NYNH - 7016
NC&STL - 3047
D&H - 1811
BAR - 1325

Other roads with significant under-40 fleets:

SOU - 13678
RDG - 3063
ATSF - 3438 (vs. 3611 50' - the 4th largest 50' fleet)
NYC - 2904 (vs. only 2699 50')
Erie - 2336
DL&W - 1943
GTW - 1672
MP - 1637
SOO - 1364
P&LE - 1191
NYC&StL - 1091
SLSF - 1084
GM&O - 1051

And the two big Canadian totals (just how many reached well south of the border remains a big topic of debate):

CN - 27000
CP - 35250

It is great to see F&C working this part of the fleet - still many gaps to fill, but they have filled some big ones for the WWII modeler. Better yet the one piece body, because some of these fleets are so large I need more than one. So easy assembly is greatly appreciated.

Hopefully F&C will keep working their way down the above list.

Someone mentioned the smaller rolling stock being a modeling advantage, and that is an attraction of WWII. Remember that only the largest 50' box cars cubed more than today's 53' trailer vans that we drive right next too everyday (and are double stacked on today's trains). Freight cars grew considerably post war - at times I think WWII HO looks like TT scale next to modern era HO.

Dave Evans

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I too appreciate F&C's efforts with 36-foot boxcars.

One of the stats I remember from John Nehrich's "Shop Talks" years ago was the number of boxcars of various lengths based on numbers from the ORER he consulted. I don't remember the exact year but I am pretty sure the reason it stuck with me is because it was a post-WWII year. About 84% of the national boxcar fleet were nominal 40-ft cars while the 36-ft and 50-ft boxcars were about the same, approximately 8% for each. I have tried to remember this ratio as I buy and build.

I also have a few undec MDC 36-foot kits around in case they may be good for something.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Don" <riverman_vt@> wrote:

But Steve & Sharon have come a huge distance since Al Ford at Willis Hobbies got Steve started in this business so many years ago.
I have picked up a number of their up-dated kits of late both to build and to sell and have been especially pleased with their new New Haven GA-2 gondolas and the 36 ft. New Haven box car now in a one piece body form. These are both great kits! The NYC 36 ft. box will be available shortly in a one piece body form as well which I'm sure will be a hit. I am very pleased with Steve's efforts with 36 ft. box cars as they offer what looks to be a longer or larger train but with less length. All part of the "optical illusion" of model railroading!

Cheers, Don Valentine


Freight Cars Monographs

Schuyler Larrabee
 

The following Freight Car Monographs are surplus to my library:



No.5. Southern Modern Freight Car Roster, by E A Neubauer and D G Casdorph - $19.95



No 6. Freight Cars from Trenton (A production roster of Eastern Car Co. and Hawker
Siddeley Canada) by John Riddell - $14.95



No 7. Modern Flatcars A pictorial review, by David G Casdorph - $15.95



No 8. Burlington Northern's Freight Cars, by David G Casdorph - $25.95



All are in as-new condition. Shipping additional.



PLEASE, off list!



Thanks



Schuyler Larrabee


S Scale PRR X29

Bill Lane
 

Live from the NASG convention is Scranton PA we have the debut of the brand
new plastic X29 from Des Plaines Hobbies/Scale America. There are currently
3 versions. New 2D-F8 trucks will be available shortly. A limited quantity
of cars was available today. There was a line of customers until they cars
were gone.



Scale has yet another essential car in its fleet.
http://www.lanestrains.com/S_Scale_X29.jpg More photos when I get home.





Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy & PRSL in 1957 in S Scale since 1988

See my finished models at:
<http://www.lanestrains.com/> http://www.lanestrains.com
Look at what has been made in PRR in S Scale!

Custom Train Parts Design
<http://www.lanestrains.com/SolidWorks_Modeling.htm>
http://www.lanestrains.com/SolidWorks_Modeling.htm

PRR Builders Photos Bought, Sold & Traded
(Trading is MUCH preferred)
<http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls>
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls

***Join the PRR T&HS***
The other members are not ALL like me!
<http://www.prrths.com/> http://www.prrths.com
<http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf>
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf

Join the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Lines Historical Society


Re: Atlas 1932 ARA Boxcar - Again

Todd Horton
 

"CofG - Appears to be accurate for a short-term paint design used for
only a year or two in the very early 1950's. See Culotta p.28."

These cars were only painted this scheme for a short time period but they still carried this paint many years later. I recall seeing a photo of a Cof G car in the 70's still wearing the "Streamlined Money Saver" paint scheme.

Todd Horton


________________________________
From: Don <riverman_vt@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, August 9, 2013 5:55 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Atlas 1932 ARA Boxcar - Again



 



--- In mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com, Lancaster James <ljames1@...> wrote:

Atlas says these are new paint schemes.
http://www.atlasrr.com/HOFreight/ho1932boxcar4.htm

Are any of the cars prototypically accurate?

Jim Lancaster
Well, let's take them one at a time.

CofG - Appears to be accurate for a short-term paint design used for
only a year or two in the very early 1950's. See Culotta p.28.

Erie - Paint and lettering are right on but will the model have
"Buckeye" ends? I'd like to think so but expect that is asking
too much. IIRC it may have a "Viking" roof, however. See
Culotta pages 124 - 139.

MEC - Nice job and accurate for those repainted from 1947 until
about 1954. The earlier MEC version from Atlas is also good.
See Cullota page 144.

NS - I have nothing to go on for this special merchandise service
paint job nor does it appear in Ted Culotta's book.

NC&StL - Right on for the "as built" paint and nice to have to go
with the earlier Atlas "cigar band" paint plan. One can
also add the "To and From Dixieland" slogan above the
reporting marks of this new version if decals can be found.
See Culotta page 170 & 174.

SAL - Appears to be right on for repaints from 1953 to about 1960.
See Culotta page 203.

With the exception of the MEC, which I was personally involved with from 1969 until about six months after the Guilford takeover, I have relied soley on Ted Culotta's wonderful book on the 1932 ARA cars.
To me this is the single best book ever written about a particular car type and one which no one interested in them should try to do without.
I just hope Ted can get things squared away so that he might offer more of what he has provided for us in the past. I know well what he has been through in the past two to three years, wish him well and recognize
his many wonderful contributions to our enjoyment of the hobby.

In closing it appears I need to take another look at the Atlas USRA rebuilds. Anyone know of a good book to suggest?

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Buckeye Steel Casting truck designation QWC

water.kresse@...
 

Does anyone know what the "QWC" designation means means for VIRGINIAN gondola car trucks as specified later in a N&W diagram sheet?  Also, what relative style would they be closest to . . . Andrews, Bettendorf, etc.



"Cast Steel Bolster, 50 Ton Truck, Class T53,Buckeye,QWC Design"



Thanks,



Al Kresse for Steve Summers


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: 36-foot boxcars

Ray Breyer
 

From: Monk Alan Alan.Monk@tube.tfl.gov.uk
Bill/all
A few years back Ray Breyer (I think) emailed a bunch of us who'd expressed interest in shorty box cars, a whole
bunch of info, listings, photos, etc., that he'd researched for his 1950-based layout.
8% of the total 1950 boxcar fleet were less than 40ft, but the majority of those were the large CP/CN fleet of 36ft
Fowler cars. Exclude those and the proportion drops to around 2.3%, with the L&N DS, Southern SU, ACL/SAL
(ventilated), D&H DS and the N,C&StL's steel rebuilds forming large parts (1000+ each) of that reduced number.
Cheers,
Alan Monk
 
Hi Alan,
 
Yep; that sounds like my work!  :-)
 
In 2008 I did a presentation at Naperville on "postwar shorties", as a primer for people to notice these older cars, and to explain how they could have a few running on their layouts. I've posted an abridged version of my car tallies to the files section of the group so everyone can see the raw numbers (I also posted the list from my 2009 clinic on postwar single sheathed cars).
 
Overall, the timeline is fascinating. In 1930, just before the Depression, fully 44% of the US and Canadian fleet were boxcars "less than 39'11" long". Once the Depression really took hold in 1931-1933 railroads purged their older equipment as fast as they could, and by 1945 the number of short boxcars was down to only 14% of the fleet (overally carrying capacity of the fleet was down too). In those 15 years over 410,000 boxcars were scrapped, with most being removed from service between 1930-1935.
 
By the end of the steam era (1959) only 2% (15,137 total) of the cars were shorties, and virtually all of those cars were either Dominion cars from the Great White North, or Ya'all Road ventilated cars. I don't have ANY ORERs from the 1960s, so I haven't tracked when the last cars of the type stopped rolling.
 
 
Oh; as an aside: when I originally crunched these numbers I was modeling 1950. Because of my results I recently backdated to the the late 1920s, simply because a 1950 car fleet can't support as many old, short, wood boxcars as I wanted!
 
Regards,
Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.

File : /All Short Boxcars, 1930-1959 (Ray Breyer).xls
Uploaded by : rtbsvrr69 <rtbsvrr69@yahoo.com>
Description : List of all short boxcars 1930-1959

You can access this file at the URL:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/files/All%20Short%20Boxcars%2C%201930-1959%20%28Ray%20Breyer%29.xls

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.html
Regards,

rtbsvrr69 <rtbsvrr69@yahoo.com>


Re: 36-foot boxcars

CJ Riley
 

CJ Riley
Bainbridge Island WA



________________________________
From: Nelson Moyer <ku0a@mchsi.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, August 9, 2013 9:43 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] 36-foot boxcars



 
<I also have a few undec MDC 36-foot kits around in case they may be good
for something.>

Bill Welch

Bill,

MDC 36 ft. double-sheathed boxcars are good for bunk house conversions,
either as single cars, or as two cars placed end-to-end. I've found
dimensions matching these boxcar bunkhouse configurations in CB&Q alignment
charts, and I've found photographs of them as well. I don't think I'd
sacrifice a resin kit, but MDC kits or RTR cars are great kitbashing
material. The resin kits can be turned into credible bunk cars.

Nelson Moyer

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: ACL O-14A box cars

Tony Thompson
 

Al Brown wrote:
Lofton (RMC 9/89 pp 53-61), Culotta (RMC 9/04 pp 90-97), and Wider (RP CYC 24 pp 65-113) all state that the ACL and C&WC O-14 rebuilds kept the original roofs, and the cars they show indeed appear to have peaked roofs; Goolsby (Lines South 10/89 pp 1-13) makes no general statement, but all the cars in his article look to have peaked roofs too. This doesn't prove no car got an odd roof, of course, but I don't know of any. (On ACL a subclass is a rebuild.)

AFAIK the O-14 rebuilds kept their 5/5/5 ends, too. (By contrast, the O-*16* rebuilds got a variety of ends.)
Thanks, Al, This is what RP CYC 24 says. I should just go with that instead of trying to interpret fuzzy photos. But I appreciate the help.

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