Date   
Re: bulkhead flatcar loads

Clark Propst
 

The roads servicing Ft Dodge Iowa started a pool with homemade bulkheads on flat cars, later buying cars or kits, GSC. These cars all started out with 6'6" bulkheads.
Chad Boas sells cast resin bulkheads for a group of CGW cars. There are very nice!
Clark Propst

Re: bulkhead flatcar loads

George Eichelberger
 

The nicest bulkhead flat load I have seen is banded ductile iron pipe from protoloads.com. The pipe, wood blocking and banding are very well done. They also have plate steel loads that would typically be shipped on bulkhead flats and other flat car loads.

Re: Atlas 1932 ARA Boxcar - Again

Donald B. Valentine
 

--- In STMFC@..., "spsalso" <Edwardsutorik@...> wrote:

The Erie car will have Buckeye ends, see link:

http://www.atlasrr.com/Images/HOFreightCars/ho1932boxcar/1108/20000324_TQ.jpg

WOW! Thanks very much, Ed. Don't know how I missed that photo in
Atlas' Past HO Releases. Buckeye ends and a Viking roofs make the
Erie car a must in multiples for me. And leave it to Bill Schneider to
come up with a great O&W photo showing one of the Erie cars as well.
That IS a prototype photo, right Bill????? What a great shot!

Thanks again, Don Valentine

Re: Masking material for painting

Donald B. Valentine
 

I have got to do some model painting this week and some will require some masking work. Having seen a plethora of advertisements for the new
Frog Brand masking tape for household use I'm wondering if anyone has been brave enough yet to try it with models. Looks like it might provide a better seal against any bleeding but I do not wish to make a mess out of something if it does not release/remove easily as well.
Has anyone tried this material?

Thanks in advance and excuse my crossposting the same question to the PCL.

Cordially, Don Valentine

Re: bulkhead flatcar loads

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Witt wrote:
Apparently the B&O was an early user of bulkhead flat as they begin converting their first group of Greenville designed flat cars, class P-25 and P-25s, as early as 1954 into class P-25d with bulkheads .
The SP started building homemade bulkhead flats in 1949. For years they were essentially used only for plasterboard. That's how I use the ones I have on my layout.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: another apology

CJ Riley
 

<.I think it is a valid technique and worth including in AOI. Could you find a spot for the photo and write a cap? I would be delighted.

You might remember Kline shading the indent in O scale hopper cars very effectively.>

 
Apologies.
Once again the new yahoo mail has bitten me. It's badly compatible with my very old OS and doesn't always do what I ask. I will try harder.
CJ Riley
Bainbridge Island WA






Re: bulkhead flatcar loads

rwitt_2000
 

Tony Thompson wrote:



"Most were originally built for plasterboard service. In my opinion, these should not be confused with pulpwood cars, which almost always have canted decks and were not suitable for use as general service flat cars. The use of bulkheads for pipe and similar long loads, as well as for packaged lumber, was at the end of the 1950s and into the 1960s, as railroads realized how versatile a car they were. But I'm sure this time line varied from railroad to railroad, so I would welcome information from anyone on the list with SPECIFIC information about a particular road."
Apparently the B&O was an early user of bulkhead flat as they begin converting their first group of Greenville designed flat cars, class P-25 and P-25s, as early as 1954 into class P-25d with bulkheads .

The roster for the P-25d was:

8800-8882 converted from P-25a, DuBois, 1954-55
9400-9424 converted from P-25. DuBois, 1957
9425-9474 converted from P-25a, DuBois, 1958
9475-9496 converted from P-25, P-25a DuBois, 1960

There were originally 180 cars, but he last revision date on the diagram was 11-14-63 and the number was 2 less at 178 cars.

Bob Witt

Re: Atlas USRA rebuild.

CJ Riley
 

I think it is a valid technique and worth including in AOI. Could you find a spot for the photo and write a cap? I would be delighted.

You might remember Kline shading the indent in O scale hopper cars very effectively.

 
CJ Riley
Bainbridge Island WA



________________________________
From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
To: "STMFC@..." <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, August 10, 2013 4:27 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Atlas USRA rebuild.



 
Tony Thompson wrote:
"I have been following the discussion of this model with some interest, because I tried a kind of "stand-in solution" to the underframe issue. It certainly does not correct the problem but it does help. If interested, you can read about it in my blog post, which is at this link.
http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2013/08/improving-atlas-model-of-usra-rebuild.html

Surprisingly, it helps out a lot.
 
One other caution about reusing Chad Boas' sidesill castings - besides the eight vs. ten panel side issue, there were different brackets, with triangular, trapezoidal, and T-shaped brackets evident on rebuilt boxcars.
 
 
Ben Hom

.


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Re: bulkhead flatcar loads

Dave Sarther
 

Tony, Bill and other interested bulkhead flatcar modelers,

CB&Q Color Guide to Freight & Passenger Cars by the late Mike Spoor has five great color photos of these cars in service on pages 94 and 95. The bulkhead flat cars for the CB&Q were built at their Havelock Shops in 1959-60 (#93500-93599 Class LP-1's had 6'6" bulkheads) and again in 1961 (#93600-93649 LP-2's with 6'6" bulkheads), 1962 (#9500-95049 LP-3's with 6'6" bulkheads and 4 cars from this group receiving 8'6" bulkheads; car #95030 was assigned to M&O Paper a division of Boise Cascade in International Falls, MN) and a final 1964 group (#95050-95189 LP-4's with 8'6" bulkheads). In 1967 the "Q" ordered 100 bulkhead flat cars ( #95200-95299) from General Steel Casting Co. From this last order of cars #95250-95299 were assigned to US Gypsum in Sperry, Iowa. Bulkhead flatcar #95151 was assigned to Big Horn Gypsum in 1969.

The "Q" bulkhead flat cars were 48'6" long between their bulkheads and had 3" thick oak floor boards. Only a very limited number were painted in the pre-merger cascade green. Others remained the standard CB&Q box car red during their CB&Q years. Photos of these cars show them carrying RR ties, lumber (all wrapped) and plasterboard (under protective cover). One photo is of an empty car in the Cicero, IL yard.

The five color photos in Mike's book are by George Speir, Jim Sandrin and Paul Winters.

While most of the CB&Q cars were built after the scope of this forum they had their origins before the cut-off dates. Hope this information helps.

Later, Dave Sarther Tucson, AZ

-----Original Message-----
From: Tony Thompson <tony@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sat, Aug 10, 2013 1:10 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] bulkhead flatcar loads






Bill Pardie wrote:

I would like to know what other loads bulkhead flats were created for. I have a couple and am not sure of what the load should be.
Most were originally built for plasterboard service. In my opinion, these should not be confused with pulpwood cars, which almost always have canted decks and were not suitable for use as general service flat cars. The use of bulkheads for pipe and similar long loads, as well as for packaged lumber, was at the end of the 1950s and into the 1960s, as railroads realized how versatile a car they were. But I'm sure this time line varied from railroad to railroad, so I would welcome information from anyone on the list with SPECIFIC information about a particular road.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Atlas USRA rebuild.

Benjamin Hom
 

Tony Thompson wrote:
"I have been following the discussion of this model with some interest, because I tried a kind of "stand-in solution" to the underframe issue. It certainly does not correct the problem but it does help. If interested, you can read about it in my blog post, which is at this link.
http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2013/08/improving-atlas-model-of-usra-rebuild.html


Surprisingly, it helps out a lot.
 
One other caution about reusing Chad Boas' sidesill castings - besides the eight vs. ten panel side issue, there were different brackets, with triangular, trapezoidal, and T-shaped brackets evident on rebuilt boxcars.
 
 
Ben Hom

.

Re: 36-foot boxcars

Donald B. Valentine
 

--- In STMFC@..., "midrly" <lucas@...> wrote:


American modellers can readily exclude almost all Canadian 36' steel-frame "Fowler" boxcars from their layouts after the time that K brakes were outlawed in interchange in the US. Very few of these cars received AB brakes, and some CPR cars kept archbar trucks into the 1960's when they went into company service. The K brakes caused many cars to be restricted to service in Canada, most hauling grain by the 1950's.

CN and CP both invested heavily in steel and steel-frame 40' cars from the late 1920's. These cars were fitted quickly with AB brakes, and were far more often seen on US roads than the "Fowlers".

Horse hockey! There were plenty of Dominion cars, damn few met the requirements of the Fowler patent, coming down the Central Vermont and the Lyndonville Sub. of the CPR right through the 1940's though they began to dwindle after that. None-the-less they were not uncommon until the mid to late 1950's. In the early 1970's I took photos of a CPR Dominion stock car in White River Jct., VT and within a month or so a Grand Trunk Dominion type box car. While I didn't look I doubt they had K-brakes and suggest to you that more of the CNR's and CPR's Dominion cars may have received AB-brakes than you realize. Will check with the CNR's retired mechanical engineer, a personal friend of some thirty years, when he returns from visiting family in Alberta and see if we can get some numbers for at least the CNR.

Cordially, Don Valentine

Re: Atlas 1932 ARA Boxcar - Again

pennsylvania1954
 

And, please, let's not forget about the extensive listing of 1932 cars prepared by Ed Hawkins on the Steam Era Freight Cars site.

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/prototype/frtcars/1932arapdfmain.html

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL

--- In STMFC@..., Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

Ed Sutorik wrote:
"Here's an interesting link illustrating the cars:
http://www.ttnut.com/1937-aar-standard-design-boxcar-survey-t1203-10.html

Ed, double check the subject line again.  We're talking about the earlier 1932 ARA cars, not the 1937 AAR cars that evolved from them.  Erie had cars of both designs with Buckeye ends.
 
 
Ben Hom



Re: Atlas 1932 ARA Boxcar - Again

Bill Schneider
 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Don
Sent: Friday, August 9, 2013 5:56 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Atlas 1932 ARA Boxcar - Again

"Erie - Paint and lettering are right on but will the model have
"Buckeye" ends? I'd like to think so but expect that is asking
too much. IIRC it may have a "Viking" roof, however"


Don,

This is a car from the last Erie run (large herald), unchanged except for
wheels, couplers and weathering.

http://home.comcast.net/~oandw/images/lm_local.jpg


Bill Schneider

Re: Atlas 1932 ARA Boxcar - Again

Benjamin Hom
 

Ed Sutorik wrote:
"Here's an interesting link illustrating the cars:
http://www.ttnut.com/1937-aar-standard-design-boxcar-survey-t1203-10.html

Ed, double check the subject line again.  We're talking about the earlier 1932 ARA cars, not the 1937 AAR cars that evolved from them.  Erie had cars of both designs with Buckeye ends.
 
 
Ben Hom


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Atlas 1932 ARA Boxcar - Again

spsalso
 

Here's an interesting link illustrating the cars:


http://www.ttnut.com/1937-aar-standard-design-boxcar-survey-t1203-10.html



Ed

Edward Sutorik

Re: Atlas 1932 ARA Boxcar - Again

spsalso
 

The Erie car will have Buckeye ends, see link:

http://www.atlasrr.com/Images/HOFreightCars/ho1932boxcar/1108/20000324_TQ.jpg



Ed

Edward Sutorik

Re: Kadee Bracket Grab attachment

Phillip Blancher <pblancher@...>
 

I used a dab of canopy glue on mine without issue.

Phil

On Aug 10, 2013 11:01 AM, "Bill Welch" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

I have been building so many wood sheathed cars that I have never had
an opportunity to use Peter Aue's excellent Drill Template (available
from Yarmouth Model Works) for Kadee's beautiful bracket grabs. This
morning I used it to prepare a "Smoky Valley" (now the Wright Trak)
Tennessee Central steel boxcar. I carefully walked the hole size up
from #79 to #75 which is the size where if I press on the ends of the
bracket it looks like it will be a press fit, which of course is the
way these parts are designed to attached. Has anyone used this method
of attachment?

Engineering plastic as we know is hard to attach with most glues or
adhesives. I would consider using epoxy but the resin ends and sides
are thick, meaning there is not much of a pin exposed for the epoxy
to grab hold of. I could enlarge the hole slightly. I also have
someone's two-step adhesive--Loctite I think--designed for
engineering plastic that I have sort of been waiting for a moment
like this to try. I still need to enlarge the hole enough to allow
the adhesive to flow into it. (I never could get Cyanopoxy to work
for me.)

With the thinner styrene section of most steel car kits, I am
planning to melt the end of the attachment pin with a hot screw driver.

Anyway I am curious how others are attaching the Kadee grab parts.
Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930
fgexbill@...







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Re: bulkhead flatcar loads

Tony Thompson
 

Bill Pardie wrote:

I would like to know what other loads bulkhead flats were created for. I have a couple and am not sure of what the load should be.
Most were originally built for plasterboard service. In my opinion, these should not be confused with pulpwood cars, which almost always have canted decks and were not suitable for use as general service flat cars. The use of bulkheads for pipe and similar long loads, as well as for packaged lumber, was at the end of the 1950s and into the 1960s, as railroads realized how versatile a car they were. But I'm sure this time line varied from railroad to railroad, so I would welcome information from anyone on the list with SPECIFIC information about a particular road.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: bulkhead flatcar loads

al.kresse
 

I've seen pipe in bulkhead gondola cars.



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----


From: "Mark Drake" <markstation01@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, August 10, 2013 2:33:01 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] bulkhead flatcar loads

I'm thinking, pipe, steel beams, etc..

Mark L. Drake
eBay ID member1108
 

________________________________
 From: WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, August 10, 2013 1:55 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] bulkhead flatcar loads
  


I would like to know what other loads bulkhead flats were created for.  I have a couple
and am not sure of what the load should be.

Bill Pardie
On Aug 10, 2013, at 5:30 AM, water.kresse@... wrote:



If like the C&O bulkhead flat cars of the era, they had a locker nested into the bulkhead structure to carry tarps and tie-downs. 

Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----

From: cwilson@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, August 10, 2013 11:20:13 AM
Subject: [STMFC] bulkhead flatcar loads

I have one of the Intermountain B&O bulkhead flatcars.  The reweigh date is "WA 3-65" and has a routing stencil "WHEN EMPTY RETURN TO B&O RR SHOALS IND" supposedly for wallboard loading.  The car has a 1951 built date and I can change the reweigh date to run it in the STMFC era as long as I know it would have had the bulkheads then.

I am looking to build a load for the car and "wallboard" can mean a lot of different things.  I did some searching and found Shoals, Indiana southwest of Indianapolis.  There is a long spur leading to a large National Gypsum plant  (There is a US Gypsum plant in the area too but does not appear to be rail served).  This points me toward gypsum wallboard (also called "sheetrock") as the load.  I have been told that gypsum wallboard started to be widely used as a replacement for "plaster and lathe" following WW2.

So what would a load of gypsum wallboard have looked like in this era?  It would have to be somehow protected from the elements on a flatcar.  I have been told that the for lumber the bundles wrapped with plastic sheets was not commonplace until the 1970's.  Would the loads have been "tarped" with the old heavy canvas covers? Or some other method?

Any insights are appreciated.  I am waiting on the arrival of an Espee Models SP bulkhead flatcar (converted in the late 1950's) that was also assigned to wallboard loading.

Craig Wilson

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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: bulkhead flatcar loads

Mark Drake <markstation01@...>
 

I'm thinking, pipe, steel beams, etc..

Mark L. Drake
eBay ID member1108


________________________________
From: WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, August 10, 2013 1:55 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] bulkhead flatcar loads



I would like to know what other loads bulkhead flats were created for.  I have a couple
and am not sure of what the load should be.

Bill Pardie
On Aug 10, 2013, at 5:30 AM, water.kresse@... wrote:



If like the C&O bulkhead flat cars of the era, they had a locker nested into the bulkhead structure to carry tarps and tie-downs. 

Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----

From: cwilson@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, August 10, 2013 11:20:13 AM
Subject: [STMFC] bulkhead flatcar loads

I have one of the Intermountain B&O bulkhead flatcars.  The reweigh date is "WA 3-65" and has a routing stencil "WHEN EMPTY RETURN TO B&O RR SHOALS IND" supposedly for wallboard loading.  The car has a 1951 built date and I can change the reweigh date to run it in the STMFC era as long as I know it would have had the bulkheads then.

I am looking to build a load for the car and "wallboard" can mean a lot of different things.  I did some searching and found Shoals, Indiana southwest of Indianapolis.  There is a long spur leading to a large National Gypsum plant  (There is a US Gypsum plant in the area too but does not appear to be rail served).  This points me toward gypsum wallboard (also called "sheetrock") as the load.  I have been told that gypsum wallboard started to be widely used as a replacement for "plaster and lathe" following WW2.

So what would a load of gypsum wallboard have looked like in this era?  It would have to be somehow protected from the elements on a flatcar.  I have been told that the for lumber the bundles wrapped with plastic sheets was not commonplace until the 1970's.  Would the loads have been "tarped" with the old heavy canvas covers? Or some other method?

Any insights are appreciated.  I am waiting on the arrival of an Espee Models SP bulkhead flatcar (converted in the late 1950's) that was also assigned to wallboard loading.

Craig Wilson









------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



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