Date   

Re: Masking material for painting

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Dunno what Tim uses, but the 218 green on that linked page is something I've
used, with great results, including not lifting DECALS I'd put on a bit too
soon . . .



Schuyler



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
va661midlo@comcast.net
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2013 9:24 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Masking material for painting





Tim,

3M makes several lines of plastic tape. Is this masking tape what you had in
mind?

http://3mcollision.com/products/masking/fine-line-masking-tape

Ken Montero



_____

From: "Tim O'Connor" <timboconnor@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, September 13, 2013 4:11:32 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Masking material for painting




The usual masking technique is to overspray the edge of the tape
with the same color that is under the tape -- and then apply the
new color over top of that. When the tape is removed, the color line
separation will be as sharp as the tape edge. Works great over all
kinds of uneven surfaces. I only use 3M plastic tape because it has
a smooth, sharp edge. Tamiya also sells such tape.

Tim O'Connor


1950's scrap loads

Brian Carlson
 

I have a few gons to load. I was thinking scrap loads but I am wondering if the scrap loads we see these days of shredded scrap were as common in the 1950’s. My understanding is Electric furnaces were just coming online after WWII. I’m looking threw my books for pics but finding few. Could those around at the time comment.  

 

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga, NY

 


Re: outstanding article on freight cars

switchengines <jrs060@...>
 

Armand, Mike, I can help you both better understand how the cars traveled in
service for the Barrett Company. First, as has been pointed out by Mike, one
should remember that the cars did not go into service until the very late 1940s,
so someone modeling the traffic is going to have to understand that this very
interesting and colorful car came on the scene a bit late in time.
The cars were loaded in Wisconsin, don't know where exactly, but the present
day traffic comes to the Chicago area on the CN (WC). During the time remit of
this list, it may have been the C&NW that was bringing them to Chicago area, but
they were holding them on a lease track for Barrett at the C&NW 40th. Street yard
in Chicago until billing furtherance was received by the railroad for movement to
a Barrett roofing manufacturing plant. As can be seen in Mike's list below, it
seems that a slate quarry in Vermont was also producing the graduals for Barrett,
that makes a lot of senses because it was desirable to have different colors to
make the different colored roofing shingles. The billing of the cars to Blue Island
(that would be to the IHB agent) also would be in line with the regular practices of
the day, the IHB having received billing furtherance or holding instructions for the
car and being in a perfect position to interchange the car to any Chicago railroad.
From what I know about the Barrett Companys' operations most of the roofing
products manufacturing plants were in the heartland or eastern part of the US,
indeed one was in Chicago on the Illinois Northern. I doubt any of the cars went
farther west than Kansas City or so, if they even had any operation at all there?
Now it's kinda fun to know that some would be on the Rutland, and the cars were
not doubt moving eastward to another Barrett plant in NJ, as they did have one
there, but I think I would not want to overdue it and have too many of them? But
it looks to be a fun kitbash car.

Jerry Stewart

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Evans" <michael.evans78@...> wrote:


Armand,
This is what Andy pulled from his records, it is from Jan, Feb & Mar 1953. This batch was the only one he has checked so far. They were interchanged between D&H and Rut at Rouses Point.

1/7, BMX843, fr Poultney, VT to Chicago, IL, Slate Granuals
2/5, BMX803, fr Poultney, VT to Chicago, Il, Slate Granuals
2/22, BMX803, fr Blue Island, Il, to Poultney, Vt, mty
3/3, BMX803, fr Poultney, Vt to Chicago, Il, Slale Granuals
3/24, BMX860, fr Blue Island, IL to Poultney Vt, mty
3/31, BMX860, fr Poultney, Vt to Chicago, Il, Slate Granuals

Remember, these cars did not go into service until 1949.
Hope this helps,
Mike Evans

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Armand Premo" <armprem2@> wrote:

Mike,Your article brought out my aborted effort to build this car.It was back on the shelve waiting to be finished or tossed.Your excellent article gave my feeble attempt new life.Thank you. You mentioned the routing of these cars over the O&LC.I have a rather sizable collection of Rutland wheel reports dating back to 1942 and have yet to find any of these cars on any of these consists.If you have some dates to help me narrow my search I would be very appreciative.BTW your layout also expresses your skills as an outstanding modeler.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: Michael Evans
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:58 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars




Guys, thanks for all the kind words on my Barretts cov hop article, it is appreciated.

I am trying to find out more info on the routing of these cars, if anybody has any info.

From interchange reports I know some of them were routed from the D&H to the Rutland RR at Rutland VT, up the Rut, across the OL&C div, on to Chicago. The Bob Collins color photo shows one going south on Richmondville hll, and I have read here that some showed up on the PENN.

I am not even sure if Barretts used all the granulated slate for themselves, or if the sold them to other roofing mfg.

Thanks for any info,
Mike Evans


Re: outstanding article on freight cars

Michael Evans
 

James,
You're right, I forgot all about that. I have seen a photo of BMX867 coupled to a Ma&Pa switcher #82. Thanks for the info on Funkhouser's.
Mike Evans

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, James McDonald <james@...> wrote:

Hi Mike,

There's photographic evidence of these Barrett cars being used on the
Maryland & Pennsylvania RR. Consequently, there's been appreciation for
your recent excellent article in the Ma & Pa community too.

One of the major industries on the line was Funkhouser's slate quarry in
Delta, Pa., which produced all manner of slate products, but among them
slate granules used in roofing. So you can include the small M&P in your
list and, by extension, its interchange railroads B&O and PRR.

All the best,

James

=-=-=-=
James McDonald
Greenbelt, MD.

From: Michael Evans
<mailto:michael.evans78@> To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com> Sent: Thursday, September 12,
2013 3:58 PM Subject: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on
freight cars


Guys, thanks for all the kind words on my Barretts cov hop
article, it is appreciated.

I am trying to find out more info on the routing of these
cars, if anybody has any info.

From interchange reports I know some of them were routed from
the D&H to the Rutland RR at Rutland VT, up the Rut, across
the OL&C div, on to Chicago. The Bob Collins color photo shows
one going south on Richmondville hll, and I have read here that
some showed up on the PENN.

I am not even sure if Barretts used all the granulated slate
for themselves, or if the sold them to other roofing mfg.

Thanks for any info,
Mike Evans


New Drill

golden1014
 

Hi Guys,

I've been using a Dremel 7.2 cordless drill for about 5-6 years for carbuilding, primarily as a drill for #78 drill bits. I've never been too happy with this drill because it's lowest setting is--I think--10,000 rpm. 10,000 rpm is a little too fast for resin and melts plastic, so I have to be really careful when using it.

Recently I've had trouble with the battery keeping a charge, so I did a little research and today went to WalMart and bought a Dremel 7300 4.8-volt cordless drill as a replacement. It's smaller than the 7.2-volt drill and readily accepts the collet I use for #78 and smaller drill bits (from Micro-Mark). Well, this thing is fantastic. It turns at 6,500 rpm, and I just drilled out all the grab holes for a Sunshine Q XM-30 in a few seconds. I did some practice drill in some Evergreen styrene which is pretty soft stuff and it worked great.

So I would strongly recommend this drill for model builders. It cost a whopping 23 bucks!

John

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL


Re: DL&W 49000-49502 1937 AAR boxcar

Mark Stamm
 

Mike,

In general it is not a bad model, to my eye matches the general characteristic of the 1937 design.  It is just not very detailed and what detail it has is moulded on.  Just changing the ladders would be difficult to carve off with ruining the ends, but from 5 feet it will serve it's propose.  

Mark P Stamm

Sent from my mobile device

On Sep 14, 2013, at 11:38 AM, MDelvec952@... wrote:

 


I'm late to this thread, but did you find a photo, Mark, and what are your thoughts on it?  


Thanks                    ....Mike Del Vecchio




-----Original Message-----
From: pullmanboss <pullmanboss@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sat, Sep 7, 2013 10:21 am
Subject: [STMFC] RE: DL&W 49000-49502 1937 AAR boxcar

 
Use the search box at the top left of the screen with the purple "Search Groups" and blue "Search Web" buttons to the right. (You'd think, bein' matrix and all, they would have been red and blue buttons.) "Search Groups" is a misleading name. It lets you search through posts only in the particular Group you happen to be viewing.
 
Tom Madden, Neo-ized and replying from the STMFC web page


--- In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

Good evening group,

I just picked up an Atlas Trainmaster kit for this car on an impulse. Does anyone have a photo of one pre 1954 so I can see how much work I have in front of me. I can't get the search feature to work for the group since I've been added to the Matrix with Neo or would have started there first.


Thanks in advance
Mark Stamm
mark@...


Re: Whiting's Milk

ROGER HINMAN
 

Whitings was a Boston based milk company served by the B&M and had a mix of leased milk tank cars and similar cars they had purchased second hand, Their traffic originated mostly in Vermont I believe so it is very unlikely to see a car outside of New England. The photo of a Whiting car in my MDT book was taken in East Chicago,IN which I presume was out there for repairs.


Roger Hinman

On Sep 14, 2013, at 12:18 PM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

 

Years ago--1997--when I lived for a year in Pasadena--oh so close to my beloved Dodgers--I was gifted a large number of decals. This was in the days of the first Email Freight Car Group administered from someone in Cookeville, TN and I gave away several set of things thru this group. Included in the gift was a set for "Whiting's Milk" done by Concord Junction. Years later I came upon a photo of one of their reefers from Arnold Menke I think. Subsequently Walthers offered an express reefer that looked like the car in the photo so I purchased an undec kit which looks pretty good to my eye.


Given the age of the decals I will probably give them a coating of the Microscale product to insure they do not disintegrate when put in water. At the same time I wonder if this company would have made it into the southeastern US. I know precious little about milk movements and milk companies except for what I have read in the hobby press. Given that Concord Junction was/is located in Massachusetts, I am betting Whiting's may have been a New England company.

I am sure there are people in this group that can educate me about Whiting's.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930





Re: outstanding article on freight cars

James McDonald
 

Hi Mike,

There's photographic evidence of these Barrett cars being used on the Maryland & Pennsylvania RR. Consequently, there's been appreciation for your recent excellent article in the Ma & Pa community too.

One of the major industries on the line was Funkhouser's slate quarry in Delta, Pa., which produced all manner of slate products, but among them slate granules used in roofing. So you can include the small M&P in your list and, by extension, its interchange railroads B&O and PRR.

All the best,

James

=-=-=-=
James McDonald
Greenbelt, MD.

From: Michael Evans

<mailto:michael.evans78@...> To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com> Sent: Thursday, September 12,
2013 3:58 PM Subject: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on
freight cars


Guys, thanks for all the kind words on my Barretts cov hop
article, it is appreciated.

I am trying to find out more info on the routing of these
cars, if anybody has any info.

From interchange reports I know some of them were routed from
the D&H to the Rutland RR at Rutland VT, up the Rut, across
the OL&C div, on to Chicago. The Bob Collins color photo shows
one going south on Richmondville hll, and I have read here that
some showed up on the PENN.

I am not even sure if Barretts used all the granulated slate
for themselves, or if the sold them to other roofing mfg.

Thanks for any info,
Mike Evans


Re: You wreck, you buy ?

Paul Koehler <buygone@...>
 

I believe worked this way.  The damaging RR would make an estimate of costs to repair car, would then contact the owing road to find the depreciated value.  If cost to repair would exceed the deprecated value they would scrap the car and settle up with the railroad.  On the other hand if the deprecated value was lower that the cost to repair, the damaging railroad could repair the car and return the car or repair the car pay the scrap value re-letter it and keep it.

 

Paul C. Koehler

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Charles R Yungkurth
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2013 12:21 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] You wreck, you buy ?

 

 

Since no one else answered I've venture my understanding.

 

The railroad doing the damage contacts the owner as to what he wants to do about the car along with an assesment of the damage. If owner elects to scrap it the damaging railroad pays the owner the value of the car and then chooses whther to scrap it ot keep it. If the car is toraly destroyed the railroad having the wreck simply pays the current value of th car.

 

Often (especially in the case of flat cars or hoppers) the owner elects to have the body returned and then they bill the damaging company for repair costs. It is faily common to see hopper or flat bodies placed upside down on a flat car and shipped back to the owner.  Have seen an occaisaon mech reefer body being sent on a flat car since these are expensive cars. 

 

Chuck Yungkurth

Boulder CO

 

From: "cddx@..."
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 7:38 AM
Subject: [STMFC] You wreck, you buy ?

 

I've just recently heard about the whole idea of "you wreck, you buy" principle of acquiring cars from other railroads. Do any of you know the details about how this worked? Did a car have to have a certain amount of damage? Or require a certain percentage of the car's value before requiring the road that wrecked it to buy it?

 

I've found photos of various cars in the G&F shops that were not original purchases. So I'm wondering how this worked.

 

THANKS!

 

-Chris Dills


Re: You wreck, you buy ?

drgwrail
 

Since no one else answered I've venture my understanding.
 
The railroad doing the damage contacts the owner as to what he wants to do about the car along with an assesment of the damage. If owner elects to scrap it the damaging railroad pays the owner the value of the car and then chooses whther to scrap it ot keep it. If the car is toraly destroyed the railroad having the wreck simply pays the current value of th car.
 
Often (especially in the case of flat cars or hoppers) the owner elects to have the body returned and then they bill the damaging company for repair costs. It is faily common to see hopper or flat bodies placed upside down on a flat car and shipped back to the owner.  Have seen an occaisaon mech reefer body being sent on a flat car since these are expensive cars. 
 
Chuck Yungkurth
Boulder CO

From: "cddx@..."
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, September 10, 2013 7:38 AM
Subject: [STMFC] You wreck, you buy ?
 
I've just recently heard about the whole idea of "you wreck, you buy" principle of acquiring cars from other railroads. Do any of you know the details about how this worked? Did a car have to have a certain amount of damage? Or require a certain percentage of the car's value before requiring the road that wrecked it to buy it?

I've found photos of various cars in the G&F shops that were not original purchases. So I'm wondering how this worked.

THANKS!

-Chris Dills


Frisco decals

Jared Harper
 

What is a source of decals to letter 1940s era Frisco hopper cars?

Thanks,

Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Re: outstanding article on freight cars

Armand Premo
 

Thank you Mike.Just what the doctor ordered.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2013 9:14 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars

 


Armand,
This is what Andy pulled from his records, it is from Jan, Feb & Mar 1953. This batch was the only one he has checked so far. They were interchanged between D&H and Rut at Rouses Point.

1/7, BMX843, fr Poultney, VT to Chicago, IL, Slate Granuals
2/5, BMX803, fr Poultney, VT to Chicago, Il, Slate Granuals
2/22, BMX803, fr Blue Island, Il, to Poultney, Vt, mty
3/3, BMX803, fr Poultney, Vt to Chicago, Il, Slale Granuals
3/24, BMX860, fr Blue Island, IL to Poultney Vt, mty
3/31, BMX860, fr Poultney, Vt to Chicago, Il, Slate Granuals

Remember, these cars did not go into service until 1949.
Hope this helps,
Mike Evans

--- In STMFC@..., "Armand Premo" wrote:
>
> Mike,Your article brought out my aborted effort to build this car.It was back on the shelve waiting to be finished or tossed.Your excellent article gave my feeble attempt new life.Thank you. You mentioned the routing of these cars over the O&LC.I have a rather sizable collection of Rutland wheel reports dating back to 1942 and have yet to find any of these cars on any of these consists.If you have some dates to help me narrow my search I would be very appreciative.BTW your layout also expresses your skills as an outstanding modeler.Armand Premo
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Michael Evans
> To: STMFC@...
> Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:58 PM
> Subject: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars
>
>
>
>
> Guys, thanks for all the kind words on my Barretts cov hop article, it is appreciated.
>
> I am trying to find out more info on the routing of these cars, if anybody has any info.
>
> From interchange reports I know some of them were routed from the D&H to the Rutland RR at Rutland VT, up the Rut, across the OL&C div, on to Chicago. The Bob Collins color photo shows one going south on Richmondville hll, and I have read here that some showed up on the PENN.
>
> I am not even sure if Barretts used all the granulated slate for themselves, or if the sold them to other roofing mfg.
>
> Thanks for any info,
> Mike Evans
>


Whiting's Milk

Bill Welch
 

Years ago--1997--when I lived for a year in Pasadena--oh so close to my beloved Dodgers--I was gifted a large number of decals. This was in the days of the first Email Freight Car Group administered from someone in Cookeville, TN and I gave away several set of things thru this group. Included in the gift was a set for "Whiting's Milk" done by Concord Junction. Years later I came upon a photo of one of their reefers from Arnold Menke I think. Subsequently Walthers offered an express reefer that looked like the car in the photo so I purchased an undec kit which looks pretty good to my eye.

Given the age of the decals I will probably give them a coating of the Microscale product to insure they do not disintegrate when put in water. At the same time I wonder if this company would have made it into the southeastern US. I know precious little about milk movements and milk companies except for what I have read in the hobby press. Given that Concord Junction was/is located in Massachusetts, I am betting Whiting's may have been a New England company.

I am sure there are people in this group that can educate me about Whiting's.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930



Re: DL&W 49000-49502 1937 AAR boxcar

MDelvec952
 


I'm late to this thread, but did you find a photo, Mark, and what are your thoughts on it?  


Thanks                    ....Mike Del Vecchio



-----Original Message-----
From: pullmanboss
To: STMFC
Sent: Sat, Sep 7, 2013 10:21 am
Subject: [STMFC] RE: DL&W 49000-49502 1937 AAR boxcar

 
Use the search box at the top left of the screen with the purple "Search Groups" and blue "Search Web" buttons to the right. (You'd think, bein' matrix and all, they would have been red and blue buttons.) "Search Groups" is a misleading name. It lets you search through posts only in the particular Group you happen to be viewing.
 
Tom Madden, Neo-ized and replying from the STMFC web page


--- In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

Good evening group,

I just picked up an Atlas Trainmaster kit for this car on an impulse. Does anyone have a photo of one pre 1954 so I can see how much work I have in front of me. I can't get the search feature to work for the group since I've been added to the Matrix with Neo or would have started there first.


Thanks in advance
Mark Stamm
mark@...


Fw: low clearance- better believe it

 

In the late 1960s I traveled to Newark several evenings  a week for my MBA.  There was one railroad bridge with low clearance.  At least once a month I would see trucks stuck underneath it.  Now with the prevalence of video we can see just how often this problem occurs. – Al Westerfield


Re: Masking material for painting

Kenneth Montero
 

Tim,

3M makes several lines of plastic tape. Is this masking tape what you had in mind?

http://3mcollision.com/products/masking/fine-line-masking-tape

Ken Montero



From: "Tim O'Connor"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, September 13, 2013 4:11:32 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re:  Masking material for painting

 


The usual masking technique is to overspray the edge of the tape
with the same color that is under the tape -- and then apply the
new color over top of that. When the tape is removed, the color line
separation will be as sharp as the tape edge. Works great over all
kinds of uneven surfaces. I only use 3M plastic tape because it has
a smooth, sharp edge. Tamiya also sells such tape.

Tim O'Connor


Re: outstanding article on freight cars

Michael Evans
 

Armand,
This is what Andy pulled from his records, it is from Jan, Feb & Mar 1953. This batch was the only one he has checked so far. They were interchanged between D&H and Rut at Rouses Point.

1/7, BMX843, fr Poultney, VT to Chicago, IL, Slate Granuals
2/5, BMX803, fr Poultney, VT to Chicago, Il, Slate Granuals
2/22, BMX803, fr Blue Island, Il, to Poultney, Vt, mty
3/3, BMX803, fr Poultney, Vt to Chicago, Il, Slale Granuals
3/24, BMX860, fr Blue Island, IL to Poultney Vt, mty
3/31, BMX860, fr Poultney, Vt to Chicago, Il, Slate Granuals

Remember, these cars did not go into service until 1949.
Hope this helps,
Mike Evans

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Armand Premo" <armprem2@...> wrote:

Mike,Your article brought out my aborted effort to build this car.It was back on the shelve waiting to be finished or tossed.Your excellent article gave my feeble attempt new life.Thank you. You mentioned the routing of these cars over the O&LC.I have a rather sizable collection of Rutland wheel reports dating back to 1942 and have yet to find any of these cars on any of these consists.If you have some dates to help me narrow my search I would be very appreciative.BTW your layout also expresses your skills as an outstanding modeler.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: Michael Evans
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:58 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars




Guys, thanks for all the kind words on my Barretts cov hop article, it is appreciated.

I am trying to find out more info on the routing of these cars, if anybody has any info.

From interchange reports I know some of them were routed from the D&H to the Rutland RR at Rutland VT, up the Rut, across the OL&C div, on to Chicago. The Bob Collins color photo shows one going south on Richmondville hll, and I have read here that some showed up on the PENN.

I am not even sure if Barretts used all the granulated slate for themselves, or if the sold them to other roofing mfg.

Thanks for any info,
Mike Evans


7'8" IH Mather boxcars

Benjamin Scanlon
 

Hullo

I am wondering if someone has a diagram of these cars that they might be able to share. I particularly want something that shows the planking, bolts etc.  I'm thinking of the C&EI 400-499 series but I understand they were typical of the type so it need not be a C&EI diagram.

Regards

Ben


Re: PRR X29 Box To SAL Ventilated REA Box?

Scaler164@...
 

Whereabouts, exactly?  I'll be heading to 'them parts' in a few weeks and would like to photograph it.
 
 
John Degnan
Scaler164@...
Scaler187@...


From: "Todd Horton"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, September 13, 2013 7:10:36 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] RE: PRR X29 Box To SAL Ventilated REA Box?



For what it's worth one of these (SAL Express) cars still exist in North Ga. Not sure if there's any else around but one for sure survived
 
Todd Horton

From: Benjamin Hom
To: "STMFC@..." Sent: Friday, September 13, 2013 6:26 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] RE: PRR X29 Box To SAL Ventilated REA Box?
 
John Degnan asked:
"Wondering about how similar PRR's X-29 [sic] boxes may have been to SAL's Ventilated REA boxes?  In S scale, SSA (S Scale America) offers a model of PRR's X-29 [sic] box that might be a good starting point for modeling the SAL REA Vent's if they are similar enough."
 
Andy Sperandeo replied:
"I didn't notice anyone else mentioning this, so I'll point out that the SAL ventilated express boxcars were actually variants of the 1932 ARA boxcar design. They were originally built as members of SAL class B6, and 55 were converted to express service between 1943 and 1954.
 
<
 
The takeaway is that I think the X29-to-B6 express variant conversion in HO resulted in a believable model, and I don't see why the same thing couldn't be done in S scale. I don't think I've ever photographed my car, but it did appear in a Model Railroader video segment I did featuring a variety of mail and express cars."
 
 
First, NO DASHES IN PRR CAR CLASSES!
 
I disagree with Andy regarding this conversion, because there are more issues than the different underframes.  The SAL carsides have the single row of rivets of the 1932 ARA design instead of the double row of rivets of the X29/1923 proposed-ARA design, and the X29 carbody is 9 inches shorter than the SAL prototype (8 ft 7 in IH vs 9 ft 4 in IH).  This is a very noticeable difference in HO scale, much less S.
 
That being said, it looks like you're caught between a rock and a hard place in S scale - start with an X29 kit and end up with a "short man in drag" model, or start with the Pacific Rail Shops 1937 AAR boxcar with square corner ends, cut it down in height by 6 inches, and scratchbuild new sides and ends, which will give you a better model but require a lot work than slapping side tabs and ventilators on the X29.
 
Ultimately, it's up to you.  Your mileage may vary.
 
 
Ben Hom



Re: PRR X-29 Box To SAL Ventilated REA Box?

albyrno
 

I've been using plastic from gallon ziplock bags for my brass engines,its fairly thick and details will not poke through it ,mainly because its cheap and convenient,
     Alan

65061 - 65080 of 183463