Date   
Freight Car Kits for Sale

Jared Harper
 

I am selling 40 freight car kits by Intermountain, Proto2000, Sunshine, Funaro and Camerlengo, Westerfield and others.  E-mail for list.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA

Re: GPEX Pfaudler Steel Milk Car: proper paint color?

Bruce Smith
 

Mark,

Since when does catenary preclude a standpipe?  On the PRR, "standpipe sections" were common under catenary.  There were two components to a standpipe section (which was marked with a sign in the catenary).  These were that the wire was usually at maximum allowed height (high wire section) and that the catenary in that section could be isolated (and turned off).  The latter was accomplished with a switch at the standpipe that deactivated the catenary when the standpipe was swung over a track.  For the PRR drawing of this, please see:

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

Mark Rickert said:

 Its normally used as a canteen for the 1630 since the overhead wire precludes  putting a water column along the main.
 

Re: PRR K8 Stock Cars

Bruce Smith
 

Don,

Um, not exactly.  The K7 was quite a rare car, with only 25 or so built and none left on the roster by 1953.  Perhaps you meant the K7A?  There were nearly 1500 of these converted from X24 boxcars.  By 1953 there were some 800 on the roster (as opposed to 515 K8), but the number plunged quickly with 117 in Oct 1958, versus 497 of the K8 cars.  Of course, in the early 1960's these cars vanished, replaced by the rebuilt round roof boxcars.

With a ratio of 3 K7a to 2 K8 over most of the steam era, the K8 is an important and missing car from any PRR fleet.  As has been pointed out, they don't make up a big % of the PRR fleet, but if you model a stock train, then you need a bunch of these! 

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

Don Said:
Well as to the question of how many in 1955 it would be around 500, see http://prr.railfan.net/freight/classpage.html?class=K8 of course the K7 would be somewhere closer to double that.

Don Burn


Re: Armour Reefers for sale

Clark Propst
 

Models are sold. Box cars to come next.

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

Re: PRR K8 Stock Cars

SUVCWORR@...
 


The PRRT&HS has drawings available in its archives.  You can check them out on prrths.com

As for the number one would need to model, just looking at the percent of the PRR fleet is not going to work.  As with flat cars and to a lessor extend gons, these need to be looked at as a special purpose cars.  In the 1950's the PRR primarily moved livestock in three trains east  FW-8, NW-88 and NW-86.  The two NW trains carried hogs only east of Columbus.  FW-8 carried cattle, lambs, hogs and occasionally fowl.  If you model any of these trains you need more than the sub 1% of the fleet.  In 1953 the PRR stock are fleet was fairly evenly divided between the K7a and K8.  By 1958, the K8 the principle stock car with a ration of approximately  8:1  If you do not model any of these trains, then the occasional west bound empty might show if you are modeling the PRR mainline or if the branch you are modeling happens to have been one which generated livestock you may need one or two.

Rich Orr

Norfolk Southern (original) freight cars page

Lee Gautreaux
 

For those with an interest in such things, I have created a page for freight cars of the Norfolk Southern. I've been wanting to do this road for a long time and I'm glad I took the time. See the following:

http://www.railgoat.railfan.net/other_cars/ns_cars/index.htm

Lee A. Gautreaux - The RailGoat
http://www.railgoat.railfan.net/

Re: PRR K8 Stock Cars

Don Burn
 

Well as to the question of how many in 1955 it would be around 500, see http://prr.railfan.net/freight/classpage.html?class=K8 of course the K7 would be somewhere closer to double that.

 

Don Burn

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of johnsykesiii@...
Sent: Sunday, September 22, 2013 5:35 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] RE: PRR K8 Stock Cars

 




 Tom:

 

Think about it.  If PRR had 1,000 of these, when they were new, how many were left in 1955, when I model?  In 1955 PRR had about 186,000 freight cars.  The K8s were a tiny fraction of this.  Lemme put it another way.  If I were buying 200 PRR cars for my future layout (which I am), only 1 would be a K8 by this ratio.  Stock cars were not common at all on the PRR.  I am buying a 4 pack of K7a's from BLI and that really goes above the two K's that would be correct for a 200 car roster (e.g., 1 K7a and 1 K8).

 

I was reading an article one time that said (correctly) that PRR had more of that one type of gondola (forget which class) than many railroads had total freight cars.

 

-- John



--- In stmfc@..., <tmolsen@...> wrote:

I am looking for drawings, photos, and other information regarding PRR
K8 stock cars. I have the builders photos and the construction
drawings (underframe, sides and end) from the Car Builders Cyclopedias
and the articles from the PRRT&HS Keystones, but would like to acquire
other photos and information about these cars for possible kit
construction.

There were 1000 built in 1924 using the PRR X29 as a guideline and the
X29 frames and were listed in the ORER in the 128079-129078 number
series. I have seen only 2 builders photos and 2 additional photos
(Paul Dunn's in Zanesville, Ohio). You would think that with a roster
of 1000 cars there would be more photos and information available.

If you have any further information, please contact me OFF-LIST.

Many thanks,

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292 (H)
(302) 503-7464 (C)
tmolsen@...




Re: grab irons on hoppers

John Sykes III
 

I think this reply got lost.

 

I rechecked the Safety Appliance standard and it specified the same 2 - 2-1/2" clearance for hopper cars even though there is nothing behind the grabs.  I guess for consistency.

 

For your model, why don't you make a jig?  You could use a piece of brass channel (or something else) and drill it on a drill press, then use it as a guide for your pin vise drill.

 

-- John

Re: grab irons on hoppers

John Sykes III
 

Correction.  I went back and looked at the Standard for hopper cars and it specified the same 2 - 2-1/2" clearance behind the grab iron, even if there was no car side behind it to interfere with the grab.

 

As for your first question, did you ever think about making a drilling jig for the grabs?  You could use something like a piece of brass channel and drill it for the correct spacing using a drill press then use it as a guide for your pin vice drill on the car.

 

-- John 



--- In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

The 1922 ARA copy of the United States Safety Appliances book that I have specifies a distance of no less than 2" and preferably 2-1/2" clearance between the car side and the inside edge of the grab.  If there is no side behind the grab, this would not be critical, except that you would want to be able to use a standard grab to repair a car if needed.  So you see a lot of hopper cars with the standard 2-1/2" offset drop grab irons on them.

 

-- John

Re: PRR K8 Stock Cars

Bill Welch
 

Tom:

If you have any luck interesting someone in the K8, make sure that they investigate the L&N stock also built w/hat section bracing using Pratt truss configuration. I believe the sides were identical, but L&N has corrugated ends of some type. C&O and ACL also had Pratt stock cars with hat section bracing.

Bill Welch

Re: grab irons on hoppers

John Sykes III
 

The 1922 ARA copy of the United States Safety Appliances book that I have specifies a distance of no less than 2" and preferably 2-1/2" clearance between the car side and the inside edge of the grab.  If there is no side behind the grab, this would not be critical, except that you would want to be able to use a standard grab to repair a car if needed.  So you see a lot of hopper cars with the standard 2-1/2" offset drop grab irons on them.

 

-- John

Re: PRR K8 Stock Cars

John Sykes III
 

 Tom:

 

Think about it.  If PRR had 1,000 of these, when they were new, how many were left in 1955, when I model?  In 1955 PRR had about 186,000 freight cars.  The K8s were a tiny fraction of this.  Lemme put it another way.  If I were buying 200 PRR cars for my future layout (which I am), only 1 would be a K8 by this ratio.  Stock cars were not common at all on the PRR.  I am buying a 4 pack of K7a's from BLI and that really goes above the two K's that would be correct for a 200 car roster (e.g., 1 K7a and 1 K8).

 

I was reading an article one time that said (correctly) that PRR had more of that one type of gondola (forget which class) than many railroads had total freight cars.

 

-- John


--- In stmfc@..., <tmolsen@...> wrote:

I am looking for drawings, photos, and other information regarding PRR
K8 stock cars. I have the builders photos and the construction
drawings (underframe, sides and end) from the Car Builders Cyclopedias
and the articles from the PRRT&HS Keystones, but would like to acquire
other photos and information about these cars for possible kit
construction.

There were 1000 built in 1924 using the PRR X29 as a guideline and the
X29 frames and were listed in the ORER in the 128079-129078 number
series. I have seen only 2 builders photos and 2 additional photos
(Paul Dunn's in Zanesville, Ohio). You would think that with a roster
of 1000 cars there would be more photos and information available.

If you have any further information, please contact me OFF-LIST.

Many thanks,

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292 (H)
(302) 503-7464 (C)
tmolsen@...

Re: GPEX Pfaudler Steel Milk Car: proper paint color?

midrly
 

I took a shot of one in Burlington Ontario in 1975 or 76 in use by Quaker State Oil.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., caboose9792@... wrote:

Glass lined stainless steel, and yes I've actually had my head in the tanks
of one of the GEPX cars (the one that was an IC power carat the end of its
revenue life.) The paint-out weathered off and that car is assigned to the
Steam department for maintenance. Its normally used as a canteen for the
1630 since the overhead wire precludes putting a water column along the
main.


At some point the GM&O acquired a few cars I believe BGRM has a GM&O
painted car and the power car on the PAL business train, #10, is ex GEPX via the
GM&O and ICG.

Mark Rickert
(yes, this post is 4 months old and not a lost mesage)


In a message dated 6/3/2013 10:58:25 A.M. Central Daylight Time,
destorzek@... writes:

It would appear that as rail shipments of milk were winding down during
the sixties, the cars were leased for transporting other edible substances.

I THINK the IRM data plaque is incorrect about the tanks being stainless;
that much may be true, but I was under the impression they were glass
lined, the glass being fused to the substrate much like porcelain.

I recall when the car came to IRM, the General American Pfaudler
Corporation up near the roof was painted out with patches of Pullman green of a
slightly bluer shade. I don't know the reason for this, and I see from the
photos it has either been removed or weathered off; only a few small patches
are visible.

Dennis

PRR K8 Stock Cars

Thomas Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

I am looking for drawings, photos, and other information regarding PRR
K8 stock cars. I have the builders photos and the construction
drawings (underframe, sides and end) from the Car Builders Cyclopedias
and the articles from the PRRT&HS Keystones, but would like to acquire
other photos and information about these cars for possible kit
construction.

There were 1000 built in 1924 using the PRR X29 as a guideline and the
X29 frames and were listed in the ORER in the 128079-129078 number
series. I have seen only 2 builders photos and 2 additional photos
(Paul Dunn's in Zanesville, Ohio). You would think that with a roster
of 1000 cars there would be more photos and information available.

If you have any further information, please contact me OFF-LIST.

Many thanks,

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292 (H)
(302) 503-7464 (C)
tmolsen@...

Re: GPEX Pfaudler Steel Milk Car: proper paint color?

Donald B. Valentine
 

I have a photo of PAL 10 in one of my GPEX three ring binders and
keep it there as a example of how some folks can ruin good, historic equipment. But I'll take exception to the "glass lined" tank comments.
When the milk tank cars were developed beginning in 1900 with the Boston Dairy Co. cars and then Whiting Milk Co. in 1910 such tanks, whether from Elyiria, of Elyria, Ohio, or the Pfaudler Corporation,
of Rochester, NY, the tanks were as stated a glass lined tank in
which the glass was fused to the steel much like an enameling process.
By the post WW II era, if not the lae 1930's, I believe you will find that the tanks were all stainless steel and that no glass lining was needed or used.

Some of the post WW II constructed cars were, indeed, used to transport other food commodities as their milk transporting days would down. Boston based H.P. Hood & Sons, for example, used a
number of the 8,000 cafrs it had under lease to bring orange juice concentrate from its plant in Dunedin, FL to Boston into the mid-
1970's. I believe Hood was the last dairy to ship milk in such cars
and that was from Eagle Bridge, NY to Boston in 1972. The Eversweet Corp. was transporting "100% pure orange juice" from Evergreen, FL
to Lyon, IL at least as early as 1955 when its predecessor, the Scenic Citrus Corp., had GPEX #977 under lease. By the time the firm had become the Eversweet Corp. GPEX #969 was under lease. this being in March 1960. Whether cars with numbers between these were under lease I do not know. Both of these cars, however, were of the GA 52 ft. express reefer style that had seen their reefer style doors
converted to a single 2 1/2 ft. door like most of the wood sheathed
GPEX cars that kept their wood sheathing ultimately were given.
Similarly, GPEX #987, a June 1946 built 6,000 gal. car originally leased to NYC based Sheffield Farms, was by 1956 leased to Boston based Baker Chocolate for transporting liquid chocolate. Mars, Inc.,
another candy manufacturer (Milky Way) had GPEX #1066 under lease by this same date. Chateau Martin aquired a number of the later cars for wine transport, and appears to have changed their reporting marks but not their GPEX numbers. GPEX #1008, for example, had been leased to H.P. Hood & Sons for some years but was ultimately sold to Chateau Martin, becoming CMWX 1008. One of my CNR friends photographed an ex-GPEX 8,000 car along Canadian Rt. 401 in Ontario in the late 1980's bearing CGMX 680 reporting marks and painted white. I do not know who owned this car or what its original number might have been. The GM&O bought several 6,000 gal. cars for use as water cars in work service, numbered in the #66180 series if I am correct and it is these cars that seem to populate museums. Lastly, in August 1978 a postwar 6,000 gal. GPEX car under lease to the Richter Vinegar Co. was pulled off of the C&O car ferry at Manitowoc, WI so that my Ford and another automobile could be put on the ferry to Ludington, MI. Two other GPEX cafrs leased to Richter were left on and the one pulled off presumedly went across on the next run. Upon inquiry I was told that these cars were used to transport vinegar between Manitowoc and a place in Michigan about ten miles from Ludington. Thus it appears that these cars spent more time on car ferries than in rail transport!
Needless to state, by the late 1950's such cafrs saw more service in freight trains than in passenger trains and the heat lines and air signal hoses were removed beyond the ends of the cars.

As to paint, I have the GPEX paint and lettering diagram for the GPEX cars and it clearly states that the cars were painted "Pullman Green" and that the letering was in Dulux Gold. The lettering sizes
were all called out as well and it is this diagram that the two NERS decal sets for GPEX milk cars was based upon.

Cordially, Don Valentine

--- In STMFC@..., caboose9792@... wrote:

Glass lined stainless steel, and yes I've actually had my head in the tanks
of one of the GEPX cars (the one that was an IC power carat the end of its
revenue life.) The paint-out weathered off and that car is assigned to the
Steam department for maintenance. Its normally used as a canteen for the
1630 since the overhead wire precludes putting a water column along the
main.


At some point the GM&O acquired a few cars I believe BGRM has a GM&O
painted car and the power car on the PAL business train, #10, is ex GEPX via the
GM&O and ICG.

Mark Rickert
(yes, this post is 4 months old and not a lost mesage)


In a message dated 6/3/2013 10:58:25 A.M. Central Daylight Time,
destorzek@... writes:

It would appear that as rail shipments of milk were winding down during
the sixties, the cars were leased for transporting other edible substances.

I THINK the IRM data plaque is incorrect about the tanks being stainless;
that much may be true, but I was under the impression they were glass
lined, the glass being fused to the substrate much like porcelain.

I recall when the car came to IRM, the General American Pfaudler
Corporation up near the roof was painted out with patches of Pullman green of a
slightly bluer shade. I don't know the reason for this, and I see from the
photos it has either been removed or weathered off; only a few small patches
are visible.

Dennis

Re: GPEX Pfaudler Steel Milk Car: proper paint color?

caboose9792@...
 

Glass lined stainless steel, and yes I've actually had my head in the tanks of one of the GEPX cars (the one that was an IC power carat the end of its revenue life.) The paint-out weathered off and that car is assigned to the Steam department for maintenance. Its normally used as a canteen for the 1630 since the overhead wire precludes  putting a water column along the main.
 
 
At some point the GM&O acquired a few cars I believe BGRM has a GM&O painted car and the power car on the PAL business train, #10, is ex GEPX via the GM&O and ICG.
 
Mark Rickert
(yes, this post is 4 months old and not a lost mesage)
 

In a message dated 6/3/2013 10:58:25 A.M. Central Daylight Time, destorzek@... writes:
It would appear that as rail shipments of milk were winding down during the sixties, the cars were leased for transporting other edible substances.

I THINK the IRM data plaque is incorrect about the tanks being stainless; that much may be true, but I was under the impression they were glass lined, the glass being fused to the substrate much like porcelain.

I recall when the car came to IRM, the General American Pfaudler Corporation up near the roof was painted out with patches of Pullman green of a slightly bluer shade. I don't know the reason for this, and I see from the photos it has either been removed or weathered off; only a few small patches are visible.

Dennis

Armour Reefers for sale

Clark Propst
 

I have too many reefers...I know...hard to believe.
 
I would like to sell 3 Sunshine 37’ wood cars and one TRAX Stan Rydarowicz steel car. All are assembled and are in service at this time.
 
Please contact me off list if you’re interested. Thanks!
 
 
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

Re: Branchline reefers

StephenK
 

I have built many Branchline kits and used Testor's liquid cement.  I have had no problems with parts falling off.    Don't worry about it!.

 

Steve Kay 


--- In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

I bought one of these kits for the first time and the parts and silk screening is exquisite but the shortcoming of the kit is readily apparent - the mounting pins are shallow and detail parts are apt to pop off. Has this been your experience? Any suggestions for putting these parts on more securely? I was thinking of drilling out the holes for the pins and using epoxy. 

Re: Branchline reefers

Rich C
 

Ed, I drill out all the holes and use wire replacements for grabs as necessary, securing them with ACC.

Rich Christie
--------------------------------------------

On Sat, 9/21/13, ed_mines@... <ed_mines@...> wrote:

Subject: [STMFC] Branchline reefers
To: STMFC@...
Date: Saturday, September 21, 2013, 3:27 PM
















 









I bought one of these kits for the
first time and the parts and silk screening is
exquisite but the shortcoming of the kit is readily apparent
- the mounting pins are shallow and detail parts are apt to
pop off. Has this been your experience? Any suggestions for
putting these parts on more securely? I was thinking of
drilling out the holes for the pins and using epoxy.

Re: Tahoe HO trucks, less wheelsets

ed_mines
 

Andy, I click on this message and the text appears for about a second and then disappears. Anyone else have this problem? 


--- In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:



Hello,

I have close to all of the Tahoe Model Works trucks available for purchase. Pairs of trucks, less wheels- are priced at $3.75/pair.

001 Dalman 2-level
002 Dalman 2-level w/ lateral motion device
003 Arch Bar 5'6" W.B.
004 Bettendorf Swing Motion Caboose
005 Barber-Bettendorf swing Motion Caboose
006 Buckeye spring plank
007 Double Truss
008 Coil-Elliptic
009 Barber Lateral Motion
010 70-ton A-3 ride control

I have Intermountain 33" wheelsets with code 110 (Fat) wheels. Add $3.00 for 4 sets (enough for one pair of trucks.
I have only a few of the Intermountain 33" code 88 semi-scale wheelsets. Also $3.00/set.

I accept checks and money orders. For a small fee I can accept PayPal. If interested, please contact me off-list <midcentury@...> Shipping of $2.75+ per order by 1st class mail.

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA