Date   

Re: Most needed car?

Eric Hansmann
 

Back in 2012, a group of pre-Depression modelers compiled a list of freight car models for mass production consideration. 

In many cases here, 10,000-20,000 of the prototypes were produced. The in-service numbers through WWII were strong on a number of these individual freight car designs. Between 1946 and 1953, the in-service numbers rapidly dwindled as a 1953 mandatory K brake upgrade pushed railroads to scrap many older freight cars or move them to maintenance service.

 

New York Central Lines - 36-foot, double-sheathed box cars with Murphy inverted corrugated ends

New York Central Lines - 40 foot, double-sheathed, door-and-a-half automobile (XA) box cars

Pennsylvania Railroad - 40-foot GRa, fishbelly side sill, composite gondolas

New York Central Lines - 46 foot,  fishbelly side sill, composite mill gons - many rebuilt with steel replacing original wood sides

1905 common standard hoppers - several railroads rostered these in the thousands

Union Tank Lines (UTLX) X-3 tank cars - came in a few different gallon versions and an insulated version

Southern Railway -  36-foot, steel underframe, double-sheathed, truss rod, box cars

Baltimore & Ohio - M-15 class 40 foot, double-sheathed, box cars

Merchants Despatch Transit (MDT) reefers - 40 foot, double-sheathed, refrigerator cars

Harriman box cars - Southern Pacific, Union Pacific, Illinois Central - 40 foot, double-sheathed, fishbelly side sill, box cars

USRA 70-ton triple bay coal hopper - over 20,000 in service for Chesapeake & Ohio, and New York Central Lines

 

Here are some additional prototypes to consider. These were not produced in the quantity of those listed above but they are distinctive designs:

1924 ARA proposed standard XM-1 single-sheathed, Howe truss box car design - L&N, B&M, more

Seaboard Air Line B-3 or B-4 box car - similarities to the XM-1 above

Atlantic Coast Line ventilated box car (an updated version better than the old Con-Cor model)

wood vinegar tank car 


I'm looking forward to the Dominion/Fowler model from True Line Trains someday. I'd be even happier if a 6-foot door version was produced to cover several US roads.


I model 1926, YMMV.


Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX




---In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

Doug Harding wrote:
"What else is there?"
 
Signature cars for major roads that have not been sufficiently explored or analyzed, and the biggest elephant in the room is the New York Central.  What modelers think is covered and what we really need as steam era freight car modelers are two different things, and we really don't know what we don't know, even with the efforts of Jeff English in the late 1990s.
 
For example, the recent release of the Broadway Limited 8 ft 7 in IH USRA-design steel boxcar would lead you to believe that we have the most common boxcar covered.  However, the NYCS raised the IH of these cars during the production run, building large numbers of 9 ft 3 in and 10 ft IH cars.
 
Another example: what is the most common NYCS hopper car?  The USRA/USRA-design twin?  Bob Karig's early common standard?  Oddball IL offset twins?  It sure as heck isn't the AAR offset twin, which was a rare care on the NYCS - only 1000 cars!
 
How many?  Nobody really knows because nobody cares enough to go through the Byzantine lot system of the NYCS to really figure this out.
 
The B&O is another one - the M-53 and M-15 subclass wagontop boxcar were certainly signature cars of the railroad, but they were far outnumbered by the 1923 ARA alternate standard steel boxcars.
 
Additionally, there's another slamdunk that hasn't been done yet - the 10 ft IH postwar steel boxcar.  (The Intermountain car is a prototype unique to the GN.)  You can sell NYC Pacemaker boxcars and SP Overnight boxcars until the sun turns into a red giant, and that doesn't include the other prototypes!
 
 
Ben Hom 


Re: Most needed car?

Steve H <nwicfan@...>
 

It would be interesting to see a list of "signature" cars and find out what types have been offered and what has not been offered.
 
- Steve Hedlund, Everett WA


On Monday, October 21, 2013 1:36 PM, Benjamin Hom wrote:
 
Doug Harding wrote:
"What else is there?"
 
Signature cars for major roads that have not been sufficiently explored or analyzed, and the biggest elephant in the room is the New York Central.  What modelers think is covered and what we really need as steam era freight car modelers are two different things, and we really don't know what we don't know, even with the efforts of Jeff English in the late 1990s.
 
For example, the recent release of the Broadway Limited 8 ft 7 in IH USRA-design steel boxcar would lead you to believe that we have the most common boxcar covered.  However, the NYCS raised the IH of these cars during the production run, building large numbers of 9 ft 3 in and 10 ft IH cars.
 
Another example: what is the most common NYCS hopper car?  The USRA/USRA-design twin?  Bob Karig's early common standard?  Oddball IL offset twins?  It sure as heck isn't the AAR offset twin, which was a rare care on the NYCS - only 1000 cars!
 
How many?  Nobody really knows because nobody cares enough to go through the Byzantine lot system of the NYCS to really figure this out.
 
The B&O is another one - the M-53 and M-15 subclass wagontop boxcar were certainly signature cars of the railroad, but they were far outnumbered by the 1923 ARA alternate standard steel boxcars.
 
Additionally, there's another slamdunk that hasn't been done yet - the 10 ft IH postwar steel boxcar.  (The Intermountain car is a prototype unique to the GN.)  You can sell NYC Pacemaker boxcars and SP Overnight boxcars until the sun turns into a red giant, and that doesn't include the other prototypes!
 
 
Ben Hom 



Re: 3-Dome GATX Type 30 Tank Car from Tangent

Bruce Smith
 

I will add that for me, modeling WWII era "pipeline on wheels" trains, a sprinkling of these cars in the fleet does exactly what I need it to do.  Much like the stair step effect of different box car heights, it breaks up the monotony of the available tank cars... now for the single dome larger GATC and UTL cars!

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

 

On Oct 21, 2013, at 1:46 PM, Andy Carlson wrote:



Hello,

I was talking with some other modelers/railfans about these new 6K tank cars. It was mentioned by an individual that in the national fleet of tank cars very few were multiple compartment cars--single compartment cars were vastly more prevalent. Therefore, it was opined, modelers should limit their purchases of multiple dome cars to only about 2% of their empire's fleet. (Gilbert/Nelson principles)

I responded by admitting that thought would be correct if their own modeling aim is mainline operations, where multiple dome cars are just sprinkled into freight train consists, but wrong if they were modeling branches and short lines. Remember that multiple compartment tank cars were useful in delivering smaller quantities of differing products to bulk and oil distributors, especially to rural areas. The small SP branch which served my hometown of Ojai, CA. had 5 online petroleum distributors which received product by rail. I would postulate that on our branch, like many other rural branches, the single compartment tank cars would be the minority. Oil distributors were commonly important business on short lines.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Most needed car?

Benjamin Hom
 

Doug Harding wrote:
"What else is there?"
 
Signature cars for major roads that have not been sufficiently explored or analyzed, and the biggest elephant in the room is the New York Central.  What modelers think is covered and what we really need as steam era freight car modelers are two different things, and we really don't know what we don't know, even with the efforts of Jeff English in the late 1990s.
 
For example, the recent release of the Broadway Limited 8 ft 7 in IH USRA-design steel boxcar would lead you to believe that we have the most common boxcar covered.  However, the NYCS raised the IH of these cars during the production run, building large numbers of 9 ft 3 in and 10 ft IH cars.
 
Another example: what is the most common NYCS hopper car?  The USRA/USRA-design twin?  Bob Karig's early common standard?  Oddball IL offset twins?  It sure as heck isn't the AAR offset twin, which was a rare care on the NYCS - only 1000 cars!
 
How many?  Nobody really knows because nobody cares enough to go through the Byzantine lot system of the NYCS to really figure this out.
 
The B&O is another one - the M-53 and M-15 subclass wagontop boxcar were certainly signature cars of the railroad, but they were far outnumbered by the 1923 ARA alternate standard steel boxcars.
 
Additionally, there's another slamdunk that hasn't been done yet - the 10 ft IH postwar steel boxcar.  (The Intermountain car is a prototype unique to the GN.)  You can sell NYC Pacemaker boxcars and SP Overnight boxcars until the sun turns into a red giant, and that doesn't include the other prototypes!
 
 
Ben Hom


Re: Most needed car?

Douglas Harding
 

Mike you have shown the true beauty of this list, Education. Now I know what a UP HK-50-4 is, a ballast hoppers. Thank You. And based upon the information you shared, I can now make an intelligent decision. I don’t need any HK-50-4 ballast hoppers.

 

Yes I model the M&StL. But the M&StL did not use ballast. It used cinders, limestone in heavy traffic areas. Cinders came from their own steam engines, no need to purchased, and was hauled in former wood gons converted to cinder cars. Limestone came from the various sand and gravel pits found along the M&StL lines. Most of this was shipped in the 50 steel side-dump gons built for the Iowa Central in 1908, or the fleet of 250 USRA drop bottom gons purchased in 1920, or the fleet of 125 ex CNW USRA gons acquired in 1942 or the 250 steel drop bottom gons purchased new in 1947. As the USRA drop bottom gon is available from InterMountain, who did their first run in M&StL paint and which I purchased at the time, my potential need for ballast cars is covered. Which is a good thing, because I don’t recall ever seeing anything moving whenever I have visited Bruceford.

 

And yes the tank car is needed on the M&StL. A lot of petroleum products moved up the line from Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas to the farmers of Iowa and Minnesota. Tank cars are needed, even a 6000 gal 3 dome version. I am regretting not purchasing an undec the other day at the Naperville meet, as I saw the Black Cat decals laying on the table next to the Tangent display. But the Tangent rep assured me that the future may well produce a car appropriately lettered for my 1949 world, and I am patient. I can wait.

 

Now as to cars we do need, lets see meat reefers are coming (they are coming? right Bill?) and there are many stockcars out there. What else is there?

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: 3-Dome GATX Type 30 Tank Car from Tangent make surprise debut

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 21, 2013, at 10:24 AM, <cepropst@q.com> wrote:

 

Might as well thought in my two cents...
 
It was made clear in the Tangent clinic, when each car’s lettering was slotted for. The 58 car can be back dated. Exhausting internet research was done Friday night, many beers gave their lives for the cause. The lingering question is: When exactly did GATC remove the stripes over/under their initials and numbers? The consensus from those in the know in the room was 52...or earlier?…

Clark, I haven't wanted to add to the (often incorrect) blather on the list about the prototypes for this model, but I can tell you, based on photo documentation, that the lines were dropped in 1945, though (of course) many cars with the pre-1945 stenciling remained in service into the early '50s and some were still around in the mid-1950s.  So a minimum of back-dating on the ca. 1958 version of the model will make it correct for the late '40s and early '50s.
 
I got the impression from gestures at the nearby (to Tangent) “Black Cat Decals” table that Allen would be modifying his GATX decal set for a 40s era set for these cars. Just my impression.

Your impression is correct.  That decal set will take care of us '40s modelers until Tangent does a factory-lettered GATX car with the pre-1945 lines above and below the reporting marks and numbers.

Regarding the complaints that there are other tank cars we need more while the Tangent model is just "cute," I would observe that it looks "cute" mostly because the three compartment tank car models we're used to are Athearn's ancient atrocity which scales out to about 11,000 gallons and which has absolutely no prototype.  The vast majority of three compartment prototypes were of 6K gal. capacity; a few were smaller, a relatively small number were 8K, and three compartment cars as large as 10K were almost (but not quite) non-existent.

In fact, 6K three compartment tank cars were numerous in the steam/transition era (several thousand cars), many were GATC Type 30s, and they were widely used, as has already been suggested, for shipments of various grades of lubricating oil and of gasoline/kerosene/distillate/diesel fuel to smaller wholesalers.  Remember, also, that not every compartment of a 6K three compartment tank car had to be full.  Some shipments used only the center compartment, others only the two end compartments.

As for other prototypes that Tangent might have modeled, by far the most needed tank car models are UTLX  X-3s and those are under development by another company, as David Lehlbach is well aware (as are those who were at the Friends of the Freight Car dinner on Thursday night at Naperville/Lisle).  Remember, also, that the Tangent model introduces some exquisitely modeled GATC Type 30 underframe components which can easily be employed on future models with different tanks (ICC 105 Chlorine cars?  7K gal. acid cars?  Not to mention 8 and 10K GATC Type 30 ICC-103s, which have never been modeled accurately except in brass).

"Cute" may be enough to sell these models to the train set bozos, especially if the models have colorful paint schemes like the Celanese model, but every prototype modeler who models ca. 1930 through the '60s and into the '70s needs at least one or two of them.

Richard Hendrickson


AC/C&G Decal Boxcar Possibilities (was Re: MR plans from disk.)

Benjamin Hom
 

Armand Premo asked:
"While conducting a recent archeological dig through my horde [sic] of decals I discovered Champ sets for Algoma Central and Columbus & Greenville. Can anyone tell me of any boxcar kits that would be appropriate for these roads?"
 
Algoma Central: Accurail 4100 is very close to AC 3101-3200.
http://www.trainlife.com/magazines/pages/144/10388/february-1993-page-14
Larger file of the same photo from the pay side of the RPI website:
http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/index.php?title=File:Rolling-stock_box-cars_40-foot-single-sheathed_algoma-c-bettendorf-xm-rail-data.jpg
 
Columbus & Greenville: If it's the set with the triangular herald, Sunshine 39.22 is the best kit (which already has decals for the car).  However, there is an option to do a quickie Tan-Dot kitbash of the Walthers/Train-Miniature SS boxcar (as Nehrich did in the following link from the pay side of the RPI website) or if you have time on your hands, a more extensive kitbash using the Walthers/T-M sides with an Accurail Hutchins roof, "squashed" Dreadnaught ends from another source, and a new underframe.
http://www.sunshinekits.com/sunimages/sun39d.pdf
http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/index.php?title=NEB%26W_Guide_to_7-Panel_Howe-Truss_40-Foot_Single-Sheathed_Box_Cars_-_C#Columbus_.26_Greenville
 
 
Ben Hom


Re: MR plans from disk.

Armand Premo
 


    While conducting a recent archeological dig through my horde of decals I discovered  Champ sets for Algoma Central and Columbus & Greenville.Can anyone tell me of any boxcar kits that would be appropriate for these roads? Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2013 2:33 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] MR plans from disk.

 

Denny-

While the digital collection might have curtailed my need to complete the missing pre-1945 issues I am not ready to dump my hard copies.

The resolution on the scans, while adequate for most uses, will not stand up to making larger to-scale prints IMHO.

On the earlier drawings it doesn’t make that much difference as they were pretty crude to begin with….but on later, more accurate detailed drawings the fuzziness is an issue for me.

Charlie Vlk


Re: MR plans from disk.

Tony Thompson
 

Denny Anspach wrote:

Friends, the past issues of MR on disk have now been out for some time, and I am interested in how useful the CD has been for those critical modelers long experienced with actively referencing the actual printed pages.

However, these many volumes take up a LOT of space that I can perhaps use to better advantage.

     Denny, I too felt I could use shelf space otherwise, and bought the DVD (not CD) set of the MR issues. I have found them very good replacements, and have now recycled all my 20th century issues. I have printed out pages occasionally and they seem fine to me. I would love to have other magazines in this form. The on-line ones, for example TrainLife, are fairly low resolution and less useful, in my opinion.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





3-Dome GATX Type 30 Tank Car from Tangent

Andy Carlson
 

Hello,

I was talking with some other modelers/railfans about these new 6K tank cars. It was mentioned by an individual that in the national fleet of tank cars very few were multiple compartment cars--single compartment cars were vastly more prevalent. Therefore, it was opined, modelers should limit their purchases of multiple dome cars to only about 2% of their empire's fleet. (Gilbert/Nelson principles)

I responded by admitting that thought would be correct if their own modeling aim is mainline operations, where multiple dome cars are just sprinkled into freight train consists, but wrong if they were modeling branches and short lines. Remember that multiple compartment tank cars were useful in delivering smaller quantities of differing products to bulk and oil distributors, especially to rural areas. The small SP branch which served my hometown of Ojai, CA. had 5 online petroleum distributors which received product by rail. I would postulate that on our branch, like many other rural branches, the single compartment tank cars would be the minority. Oil distributors were commonly important business on short lines.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: MR plans from disk.

kedes@...
 

Denny, The MR disc is very good for searching for specific topics. While its search tools are quite simole they work well. The readability on line or as a print out is just fine. I cannot speak to the precision of plans printed out.


I have used the search capabilities to find, for example, some suggestions for bulding some freight car and MOW loads, track bumpers etc. 


The fact that you can dump (recycle) 30-40 bookshelf feet of old MR's increases the value.


LArry Kedes




---In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

Friends, the past issues of MR on disk have now been out for some time, and I am interested in how useful the CD has been for those critical modelers long experienced with actively referencing the actual printed pages.

I have an almost complete set of issues 1934-1990. I do reference them from time to time for plans, and also for the sheer enjoyment of learning (again) that some of the greatest modelers ever in this hobby could work their magic to current standards, yet with only a micro percentage of the resources we currently so rely upon.

However, these many volumes take up a LOT of space that I can perhaps use to better advantage.

How readable, and how accurate are plans printed out from the CD? Although the printed page has a direct scale, i.e. ⅛", 3.5mm, 3/16", ¼" etc./ft. that can easily used to translate measurements to one's own scale, how does this work on the CD?

I also house a complete set of Model Craftsman/Railroad Model Craftsman with similar questions to be posed (to my knowledge, their old issues are NOT yet on CD, however).

Thanks in advance for your good opinions-

Denny




Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento

Please note my new eMail address.


Re: MR plans from disk.

Charlie Vlk
 

Denny-

While the digital collection might have curtailed my need to complete the missing pre-1945 issues I am not ready to dump my hard copies.

The resolution on the scans, while adequate for most uses, will not stand up to making larger to-scale prints IMHO.

On the earlier drawings it doesn’t make that much difference as they were pretty crude to begin with….but on later, more accurate detailed drawings the fuzziness is an issue for me.

Charlie Vlk


Re: Hutchins roofs

dahminator68
 

Hello:  I have available the 4/4 Dreadnaught ends and Hutchins roofs.  I will list more details about them on Friday.
Andrew Dahm

From: Rich C
To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Friday, October 18, 2013 9:12 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Hutchins roofs

 
I had no problem ordering those roofs along with other detail parts from Claire at Sylvan. That was back in February of this year.

Rich Christie


On Friday, October 18, 2013 8:51 AM, O Fenton Wells wrote:
 
Ben, I had a similiar problem and they made a new mold and shipped the castings to my local hobby shop.  They even called my local hobby shop and said they would do that to accept the order.  The parts look great and I used one set (roof) on a SR 40 DD rebuild.  I do think they are losing interest due to lac of sales however.  Most of us don't kit bash any more.
Fenton Wells


On Fri, Oct 18, 2013 at 7:54 AM, Brian Carlson <prrk41361@...> wrote:
 
Be advised a little over a year ago (maybe more), I inquired about getting  various ends and roofs to create CN and CP boxcars from Stafford Swain’s (I think) articles in RMC from years ago. I was told at the time the roof castings and ends were out of stock/discontinued as he was concentrating on vehicles.  I have been looking on the secondary market now, but these parts just haven’t shown up. Maybe/hopefully the situation has changed. I have a pile of Black Cat decals and undec boxcars waiting to get built.
 
Brian J. Carlson, P.E.
Cheektowaga, NY
 
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Benjamin Hom
Sent: Thursday, October 17, 2013 3:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Hutchins roofs
 
 
Ed Mines asked:
"A while back a Canadian company offered Hutchins roof castings which fit the Athearn blue box 40 ft box car. Anyone remember who? Are they still available? Do they have a web site?"
 
Sylvan Scale Models made the resin roof castings to kitbash Canadian 1937 AAR boxcar variations.
http://sylvanscalemodels.com/
http://www.isp.ca/sylvan/freightcar.htm
 
 
Ben Hom



--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...





MR plans from disk.

Anspach Denny <danspachmd@...>
 

Friends, the past issues of MR on disk have now been out for some time, and I am interested in how useful the CD has been for those critical modelers long experienced with actively referencing the actual printed pages.

I have an almost complete set of issues 1934-1990. I do reference them from time to time for plans, and also for the sheer enjoyment of learning (again) that some of the greatest modelers ever in this hobby could work their magic to current standards, yet with only a micro percentage of the resources we currently so rely upon.

However, these many volumes take up a LOT of space that I can perhaps use to better advantage.

How readable, and how accurate are plans printed out from the CD? Although the printed page has a direct scale, i.e. ⅛", 3.5mm, 3/16", ¼" etc./ft. that can easily used to translate measurements to one's own scale, how does this work on the CD?

I also house a complete set of Model Craftsman/Railroad Model Craftsman with similar questions to be posed (to my knowledge, their old issues are NOT yet on CD, however).

Thanks in advance for your good opinions-

Denny




Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento

Please note my new eMail address.


Re: C&BT Car Shops -- Re: History of Prototype Freight Car M

Benjamin Hom
 

Dave North wrote:
"There are a number of items in the line that are out of stock, and based on discussions we have had, I doubt that will change."
 
I also take that little, if any, upgrading of tooling has been done unless you can confirm otherwise.  I'm also curious if the PRR Class X29B model will ever see the light of day.  If offered in an Accurail-quality kit (i.e., no terrible detail parts or warped underframes) with quality paint schemes, it should sell well, even as a one-road car (especially as the Merchandise Service MS1 paint scheme is correct for Class X29B).
 
 
"The bodies, doors etc are OK, as long as you don’t mind the cast on ladders etc.
The walks are usually terrible, but Plano has etched ones available, and A-line make nice stirrups.
Kit wheels are also worthy of replacement.
That said they can be build into a reasonable car and with some moderate upgrading, can hold their own with Accurail and Atlas Trainman."
 
I balk at burning a Plano running board on a Tan-Dot car, but the availability of better quality trucks and wheelsets and Accurail and Branchline parts provide good fodder to replace the underframe and detail parts.
 
 
"I have a few that I use on our portable club layout. They certainly are not on a par with the highly detailed Tangent, Exactrail etc etc offerings available today - and neither is their price."
 
We made a sizable investment in these cars when they first came out in the 1980s (including a run custom-decorated in NEB&W).  I'm working out some upgrades for these cars in an effort to recoup sunk costs (and sell off those we no longer need or are superceded by later models on hand.)
 
 
Ben Hom


Re: Multi-dome tank car data

Tony Thompson
 

Al Brown wrote:
 
Very interesting that the SVX cars appear to have one compartment twice as big as the other. Now *that* would be an unusual model.

       There were a very few cars with one big and one small compartment, evidently built that way with equal-size domes. There were also cars with a big center dome and a small side dome, evidently conversions from single-compartment cars. Either could be readily kitbashed from the new Tangent car, either in kit form or in the primer-painted but unlettered version, and even in the lettered car--the location of lettering would make it easy to preserve, but then the car number and some other data would need replacing.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Most needed car?

Mikebrock
 

Doug Harding writes:

"What is a UP HK-50-4?"

Well, of course, a UP HK-50-4 [ as well as the similar HK-50-3 and HK-50-5 ] were ballast hoppers. The HK-50-5 might actually be a better choice because it was originally built as a composite car with wood siding which was changed to steel in '51. The car is perhaps more interesting because it has outside bracing. The HK-50-3 and HK-50-4 had straight "slab-like" sides which only a UP nu...uh...modeler would probably appreciate.

"And until now, I was not aware I needed one."

Well, I just naturally assumed that most RRs [ well...maybe not those in New England...wherever that is...] would have bought large amounts of ballast from Buford [ on Sherman Hill ]...or even from Bruceford...that is, if the Fast Mail ever got out of the way. Anyhow, long strings of ballast cars could generally be seen moving across Big Wyoming. What more could you want?

Lessee, Doug. Don't you model the M&StL? You might want to consider the tank car.

Mike Brock

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Multi-dome tank car data

al_brown03
 

Very interesting that the SVX cars appear to have one compartment twice as big as the other. Now *that* would be an unusual model.

 

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla. 


Re: AUTOMOBILE SHIPMENTS IN BOX CARS IN THE 1950S

Tony Thompson
 

Richard Hendrickson wrote:

 
Owing partly to the development of the interstate highway system in the '50s, the shipment of new autos by truck rather than by rail made serious inroads into rail traffic of new autos, which is why the railroads began developing auto rack flat cars.  However, at least from 1945 through the late '50s, rail shipments of new autos, as well as of auto parts, was a substantial source of revenue, and the railroads developed a system of assigned-service pools in which each RR on a certain route contributed a number of cars to the pool roughly proportional to their route mileage.  Cars assigned to the pools had pool numbers and return routes stenciled on them so they would rapidly be returned empty to the point of origin.

     Though broadly correct, I think this summary gives somewhat the wrong impression. If you look at traffic statistics, shipping of completed autos by rail declined sharply after 1950, and by 1959 less than 10 percent of all new autos went to market by rail. That was entirely reversed in the 1960s with auto racks, as some other freight car list would cover. Auto parts are a different story, and Richard's summary is right on target.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: 3-Dome GATX Type 30 Tank Car from Tangent make surprise debut

Clark Propst
 

Might as well thought in my two cents...
 
It was made clear in the Tangent clinic, when each car’s lettering was slotted for. The 58 car can be back dated. Exhausting internet research was done Friday night, many beers gave their lives for the cause. The lingering question is: When exactly did GATC remove the stripes over/under their initials and numbers? The consensus from those in the know in the room was 52...or earlier?...
 
I got the impression from gestures at the nearby (to Tangent) “Black Cat Decals” table that Allen would be modifying his GATX decal set for a 40s era set for these cars. Just my impression.
 
I’ve already changed the most noticeable date on my ‘58’ car (I was lucky enough with my scratching to turn the eight into a zero...on one side, had to add a decal zero to the other) and have some chalk marks on one side. I hope to have it weathered and on the layout for tonight’s ops here.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

75701 - 75720 of 194661