Date   

Re: Red Devil Coal Loader

nick.gully@...
 

 http://eadsrv.denverlibrary.org/sdx/pl/toc.xsp?id=WH512_d0e154020&qid=sdx_q0
&fmt=text&idtoc=WH512-pleadetoc&base=fa&n=1&ss=true&as=true&ai=collection-ca
t|


Apparently the Denver Public Library in their archive of D&RGW plans has structural drawings from 1946 of a Red Devil coal loader produced by Ross, White Engineers who made them under that brand name.


-Nick Gully



---In stmfc@..., <richtownsend@...> wrote:

Red Devil Coal Loaders sometimes were used to load steam era freight cars, as well as to load steam era locomotive tenders with coal hauled in steam era freight cars. I am looking for steam era diagrams of Red Devil Coal Loaders or steam era advertising or other promotional materials plainly showing what a Red Devil Coal Loader looked like.  Any suggestions?  Google comes up with nothing.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


Re: Boxcar Ends

midrly
 

Those are Type "D" couplers on the cars, are they not?


Steve Lucas. 



---In stmfc@..., <rtbsvrr69@...> wrote:

>Here is a link to a Shorpy post showing the ends of two boxcars taken in
>Washington, D.C., in 1925.
>http://www.shorpy.com/node/16007?size=_original#caption
>Click on the photo to enlarge it.
>The detail is quite good…so good one can distinguish the paint deterioration around
>the area of the brake platform from the boots of brakemen.
>Bob Chaparro
 
 
 
Here's the link to the actual image:
 
And here's a better view of the L&N auto
box:
 
 
Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL
 


Re: Boxcar Ends

Ray Breyer
 

>Here is a link to a Shorpy post showing the ends of two boxcars taken in
>Washington, D.C., in 1925.
>http://www.shorpy.com/node/16007?size=_original#caption
>Click on the photo to enlarge it.
>The detail is quite good…so good one can distinguish the paint deterioration around
>the area of the brake platform from the boots of brakemen.
>Bob Chaparro
 
 
 
Here's the link to the actual image:
 
And here's a better view of the L&N auto box:
 
 
Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL
 


Re: double sheathed & single sheathed - most common in the early 1950s

Larry Kline
 

The photo of AB&C 27061 with a 1940 reweigh date in the Goolsby’s AB&C book is apparently also the photo in the September 2008 Seaboard-Coast Line Modeler.

I may have missed a reference in this thread, but I don't think anyone has mentioned a photo of the one of the 22 ACL survivors were “rebuilt steel” in the early 50s.

Larry Kline
Pittsburgh, PA

Al Brown wrote:
ACL got USRA SS *originals* at the end of 1945, by merging the AB&C. These cars were numbered ACL 26000-26189, but received no ACL class until the 22 survivors were “rebuilt steel” in the early 50s. The rebuilds became class O-28. (See RP CYC 17 and discussion earlier tonight.) The AB&C USRA SS cars, AB&C 27000-27199, had been AB&A 27000-27199 until a name change in 1925. Goolsby’s AB&C book has (p 220) a photo of AB&C 27061 with a 1940 reweigh date, which shows the paint scheme; another photo (p 73) shows two 27000-series cars behind the motor car of the Waycross & Western. 


Re: Boxcar Ends

Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote:

Here is a link to a Shorpy post showing the ends of two boxcars taken in Washington, D.C., in 1925.

http://www.shorpy.com/node/16007?size=_original#caption http://www.shorpy.com/node/16007?size=_original#caption

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

The detail is quite good…so good one can distinguish the paint deterioration around the area of the brake platform from the boots of brakemen.

Cab I assume the stenciled “B� on the car to the right stands for “B’ end of the car?

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA
Great photo, Bob. Note too the presence of good, fractured stone
ballast in a yard BUT no tie plates!!!!

Cordially, Don Valentine


Boxcar Ends

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Here is a link to a Shorpy post showing the ends of two boxcars taken in

Washington, D.C., in 1925.

http://www.shorpy.com/node/16007?size=_original#caption

Click on the photo to enlarge it.

 

The detail is quite good…so good one can distinguish the paint deterioration around the area of the brake platform from the boots of brakemen.

 

Cab I assume the stenciled “B” on the car to the right stands for “B’ end of the car?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: double sheathed & single sheathed - most common in the early 195os

al_brown03
 

Couple of things I forgot:

(1) The 7/50 ORER shows no AB&C cars, of any kind. It does show ACL series 26007-26186, 22 cars, composite. So, the rest of the series was scrapped within four years of the merger, and all survivors were re-lettered. AB&C was a shoestring operation: I speculate that their cars were in ratty shape. (The two behind the W&W doodlebug look beat-up.) So, question for cognoscenti: when did the last AB&C cars disappear?

(2) C&WC got no cars from AB&C, and AB&C had no 40' DS boxcars. (AB&C's USRA SS cars were their only 40' boxcars.)


AL B.



---In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

ACL was one of three railroads to receive both USRA double-sheathed and USRA single-sheathed boxcars, but only their DS cars came directly from the USRA. The double-sheathed cars were ACL 46000-46949, class O-14. Subsidiary C&WC also got USRA DS boxcars, C&WC 8000-8299. (See RP CYC 16.) All the ACL and C&WC USRA DS cars were rebuilt with steel bodies in the late 1930s, same numbers, class O-14-A. (See RP CYC 24.) ACL got USRA SS *clones* (not originals) in the early 1920s, class O-16: see my post earlier this evening. All these were also rebuilt with steel bodies, during WWII. (See FFC 1, p 7.) ACL got USRA SS *originals* at the end of 1945, by merging the AB&C. These cars were numbered ACL 26000-26189, but received no ACL class until the 22 survivors were “rebuilt  steel” in the early 50s. The rebuilds became class O-28. (See RP CYC 17 and discussion earlier tonight.) The AB&C USRA SS cars, AB&C 27000-27199, had been AB&A 27000-27199 until a name change in 1925. Goolsby’s AB&C book has (p 220) a photo of AB&C 27061 with a 1940 reweigh date, which shows the paint scheme; another photo (p 73) shows two 27000-series cars behind the motor car of the Waycross & Western.


All y’all confused now?


Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

 


---In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., <npin53@...> wrote:
>
> There is a picture of an ACL rebuild in Ted's Box and Auto Car
> Reference manual. I don't have it here in front of me, but I know
> there is at least one picture in there.
>
> Aaron Gjermundson
>


Actually there are two photos in Ted's book, both on page #35 and
both rebuilds with steel sides. YThe upper one is C&WC #8221 and the lower one is ACL #46683. The caption material claims the ACL received
950 cars while the C&WC received 300, all from ACF. No mention is made of the cars being inherited with the AB&C or any other road purchased but does note that the shrank 2 inches in height when rebuilt with their original roofs to become Class O-14-A.

I'd still like to see a good, clear photo of one paintged and lettered for the Atlanta, Birmingham & Coast.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: double sheathed & single sheathed - most common in the early 195os

al_brown03
 

ACL was one of three railroads to receive both USRA double-sheathed and USRA single-sheathed boxcars, but only their DS cars came directly from the USRA. The double-sheathed cars were ACL 46000-46949, class O-14. Subsidiary C&WC also got USRA DS boxcars, C&WC 8000-8299. (See RP CYC 16.) All the ACL and C&WC USRA DS cars were rebuilt with steel bodies in the late 1930s, same numbers, class O-14-A. (See RP CYC 24.) ACL got USRA SS *clones* (not originals) in the early 1920s, class O-16: see my post earlier this evening. All these were also rebuilt with steel bodies, during WWII. (See FFC 1, p 7.) ACL got USRA SS *originals* at the end of 1945, by merging the AB&C. These cars were numbered ACL 26000-26189, but received no ACL class until the 22 survivors were “rebuilt  steel” in the early 50s. The rebuilds became class O-28. (See RP CYC 17 and discussion earlier tonight.) The AB&C USRA SS cars, AB&C 27000-27199, had been AB&A 27000-27199 until a name change in 1925. Goolsby’s AB&C book has (p 220) a photo of AB&C 27061 with a 1940 reweigh date, which shows the paint scheme; another photo (p 73) shows two 27000-series cars behind the motor car of the Waycross & Western.


All y’all confused now?


Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

 


---In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., <npin53@...> wrote:
>
> There is a picture of an ACL rebuild in Ted's Box and Auto Car
> Reference manual. I don't have it here in front of me, but I know
> there is at least one picture in there.
>
> Aaron Gjermundson
>


Actually there are two photos in Ted's book, both on page #35 and
both rebuilds with steel sides. YThe upper one is C&WC #8221 and the lower one is ACL #46683. The caption material claims the ACL received
950 cars while the C&WC received 300, all from ACF. No mention is made of the cars being inherited with the AB&C or any other road purchased but does note that the shrank 2 inches in height when rebuilt with their original roofs to become Class O-14-A.

I'd still like to see a good, clear photo of one paintged and lettered for the Atlanta, Birmingham & Coast.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: double sheathed & single sheathed - most common in the early 1950s???

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...>
 

They do rather tend to jump out don't they? They must have startled a few 1930s railfans when they first came out in that colour.

Silver paint tended to go a bit greyish after a while in the sun and weather; if the silver sore thumb sticks out just *too* much on your layout , try using a 70/30 mix of silver and reefer white to cut the intense shine of the silver paint, then apply some weathering. 

Aidrian



On Wed, Oct 30, 2013 at 3:09 PM, <lucas@...> wrote:
 

The Georgia RR steel USRA boxcar rebuilds were originally painted silver and black when rebuilt in the 1930's.  Luckily for those modelling 1954 and later, these cars were repainted freight car red.  So they don't stick out like silver "sore thumbs" on a layout set in 1954 or later.  


Re: double sheathed & single sheathed - most common in the early 1950s???

midrly
 

The Georgia RR steel USRA boxcar rebuilds were originally painted silver and black when rebuilt in the 1930's.  Luckily for those modelling 1954 and later, these cars were repainted freight car red.  So they don't stick out like silver "sore thumbs" on a layout set in 1954 or later.  Tichy has the decals. 


Steve Lucas.



---In stmfc@..., <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Among the many things I dislike about the new Yahoo format is that threads sure are difficult to track, especially the order of the replies, and so I am not sure if my message will repeat something already said.


Anyway, in terms of USRA boxcars in the south, the ACL was the only owner of the 40-ton Double Sheathed cars that were all rebuilt with steel sides. The Georgia, Clinchfield and RF&P owned the SS 50-ton cars and those owned by the Clinchfield and RF&P survived pretty much intact except for AB Brakes being applied into the 1950's. The Georgia car had steel applied but retained the vertical and diagonal bracing.


Bill Welch



---In stmfc@..., <benjaminscanlon@...> wrote:

The only southeastern lines that got USRA SS box cars were the AB&A,
later absorbed by the ACL, and the GA. The GA cars were rebuilt in the
'30s with steel sheathing. the ACL cars were rebuilt with steel bodies
in the '40s except for a few that went second hand to the Columbia,
Newbury & Laurens, where they survived into the mid-'50s.


Hi, an old thread from 2005.

I am wondering if the AB&A (or would it have been AB&C by that time?) USRA boxcars that went from ACL to the CN&L  (I think it is the Columbia, Newberry and Laurens)  were the CN&L series 2525-2549? 

Their series 2500-2524 look similar to a USRA s/s but have Z trusses rather than the hat section truss.

http://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/uploads/r/null/9/2/925270/ee238d17-5dd6-4287-a8ac-5e0b1d8a9c92-A28732.jpg

At the same time, CN&L doesn't show up as an owner in the 'USRA s/s boxcars against time' spreadsheet in our files section.

Regards, Benjamin S.

 



---In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

On Jun 22, 2005, at 2:45 AM, matthewjstrickland wrote:

> i understand that double sheathed USRA were more common place than
> single sheathed. Can anyone hazzard a guess at the ratio for the early
> 1950s. I am just trying to get an aprroximate mix for roster for my
> model railroad. It is based on a south eastern prototype if that
> effects anything.

The number of cars originally built was very close; 25,000 for single
sheathed, 24,500 for double sheathed (this, of course, does not include
clones built in the '20s after the USRA relinquished control of the
RRs). By the early '50s, however, more of the single sheathed cars
were still in service in more or less original form. The all wood
bodies of the double sheathed cars deteriorated faster than the
steel-framed bodies on the SS cars, so more of them were rebuilt or
retired in the 1930s and '40s.

The only southeastern lines that got USRA SS box cars were the AB&A,
later absorbed by the ACL, and the GA. The GA cars were rebuilt in the
'30s with steel sheathing. the ACL cars were rebuilt with steel bodies
in the '40s except for a few that went second hand to the Columbia,
Newbury & Laurens, where they survived into the mid-'50s.

As for USRA 40T double sheathed box cars, the ACL got 950 of them and
later inherited another 300 when it acquired the C&WC, but all of those
cars were rebuilt in the '40s and no other SE RR had them.

As suggested by Tim Gilbert, it would be hard to justify more than one
or two USRA cars of either type on a model RR representing an early
'50s southeastern prototype. Foreign roads that still had USRA SS 50T
box cars in service that might have turned up in interchange included
Ann Arbor, Maine Central, MILW, Reading, and RF&P; Pennsy was still
running some X26s, but they had been rebuilt with new rooms and steel
doors. B&M, Frisco, MoPac, and Rock Island were among the RRs that
still had some of the USRA 40T DS box cars in service. However, these
cars would have been seen only rarely in interchange on SE lines.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: double sheathed & single sheathed - most common in the early 195os

Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...> wrote:

<<I'd still like to see a good, clear photo of one paintged and lettered
for the Atlanta, Birmingham & Coast.>>

Don

I *think* there was one in Larry Goolsby's Book on the AB&C from the
SAL/ACL HS- I don't have a copy to hand as mine vanished in one of
our intercontinental moves so can't be 100% sure of that being the source.

I still have a model in the bult cars stsch that I built from that photo
though - from memory it has pretty standard ARA lettering, AB&C
reporting marks in Roman over the number and standard dimensional
data, Waycross
(WX) reweigh, no herald or other markings

Aidrian

It Appears that you are right on about the lettering, Aidrian.
Ray Breyer sent me a photo off list and it is about the most plain Jane looking lettering I have ever seen. It is, however, what I was seeking so I'm pleased to have it and thank Ray for it.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Red Devil Coal Loader

drgwrail
 

Rich:
 
I think there is a Red Devil brocure in the CO RR Musuem Library.
 
Will search and get back to you.
 
Chuck yungkurth

From: "richtownsend@..."
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 5:36 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Red Devil Coal Loader

 
Gene,
 
You just saved me a trip to the University of Oregon Library.  I was thinking the RMEs would be likely to have advertisements for Red Devil Coal Loaders.  Did you check the ad indices, or did you focus on the editorial contents? Any idea of the name of the company that made them?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


-----Original Message-----
From: bierglaeser
To: STMFC
Sent: Tue, Oct 29, 2013 3:17 pm
Subject: RE: Re: [STMFC] Red Devil Coal Loader

 
Richard,
I, too, have been looking for useful modeling information on the Red Devil coalers and have found nothing.   I&apos;ve gone through hundreds of issues of Railway Age, Railway Mechanical Engineer and the like.  No luck!  I surely hope you come up with a new search idea that bears fruit.
Gene Green 


 



Re: Red Devil Coal Loader

Richard Townsend
 

Gene,
 
You just saved me a trip to the University of Oregon Library.  I was thinking the RMEs would be likely to have advertisements for Red Devil Coal Loaders.  Did you check the ad indices, or did you focus on the editorial contents? Any idea of the name of the company that made them?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


-----Original Message-----
From: bierglaeser
To: STMFC
Sent: Tue, Oct 29, 2013 3:17 pm
Subject: RE: Re: [STMFC] Red Devil Coal Loader

 
Richard,
I, too, have been looking for useful modeling information on the Red Devil coalers and have found nothing.   I've gone through hundreds of issues of Railway Age, Railway Mechanical Engineer and the like.  No luck!  I surely hope you come up with a new search idea that bears fruit.
Gene Green 


 


Re: double sheathed & single sheathed - most common in the early 195os

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...>
 


<>

Don 

I *think* there was one in Larry Goolsby's Book on the AB&C from the SAL/ACL HS- I don't have a copy to hand as mine vanished in one of our intercontinental moves so can't be 100% sure of that being the source. 

I still have a model in the bult cars stsch that I built from that photo though  - from memory it has pretty standard ARA lettering, AB&C reporting marks in Roman over the  number and standard dimensional data, Waycross (WX) reweigh, no herald or other markings 

Aidrian


Re: Lead shot in flat cars

Steve SANDIFER
 

I melt led in a small cast iron skillet purchased for this purpose. I heat it over a one burner electric hot plate, also purchased for this purpose. I got both at garage sale for $2-3 each. I have cast lead in wooden molds to go into engines. Then I have to mill out certain areas for mechanisms, etc. For car weights, I just pour it out on an old cookie sheet and then use tin snips to cut it into car widths and figure the weight I need. When you poor it onto a cookie sheet it will set up extremely fast.

I purchased a bag of the smallest led shot I could find at the gun store and pour those little balls into the center sill of a flat car and glue it in with super glue then follow up with further applications of Elmers glue. It takes several applications to keep them all in.

Of course any good home builders will sell sheet led or led parts for where vents extend through the roof of a house. You can cut that lead into car width strips. It is usually consistent in thickness and surface.

________________________________________________________________
Steve Sandifer
12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477
713-376-0684
www.ssandifer.com

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of john.allyn@comcast.net
Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 3:48 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Lead shot in flat cars


I have successfully melted lead (sash weights) for car weights using the Micro-Mark ladle and a Bernzo-Matic torch. I've had less success molding it and I'm open to suggestions. I've generally ended up with fishing weight size blobs which I hammer out more or less flat.
John B. Allyn

_____

From: "Ben Heinley" <bheinley@gmail.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 3:38:35 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Lead shot in flat cars


My apologies!
Tony Thompson tried to tell me about lead's vaporization point but I did not get the hint until his second suggestion that I look into leads characteristics. I looked up what he said and low and behold I found that lead, according to one chart, has a melting point of 328 degrees while the vaporization point is 1750 degrees! I also found that Micro Mark has metal melting ladles etc. I personally still would not melt lead especially on the kitchen stove.
Ben in Denver

On Tue, Oct 29, 2013 at 8:05 AM, Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfieldalfred@frontier.com> wrote:

I worked with lead powder for 30, years, adding it to polyester castings for my kits. I worked on a disposable surface in front of a negative air vent. I’ve had no health problems. Wait. What was I saying? Something about lead?

I tested the castings for lead occasionally and found no response. As a result I only cautioned modelers to use a dust mask when filing the casting and wash their hands afterward. On models many years old some lead oxide did come to the surface.

I considered depleted uranium but the powder was to hard to come by. - Al Westerfield

From: bheinley@gmail.com
Sent: Monday, October 28, 2013 4:08 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: Re: [STMFC] Lead shot in flat cars


"Depleted" uranium is some nasty s**t! The term "depleted" is used to indicate that some of the radiation has been removed by processing or milling. During the Gulf War so many Iraqi tanks were destroyed by anti-tank rounds made of "depleted" uranium that our solders were ordered to not enter any destroyed Iraqi vehicles due to high radiation exposure.

Lead can be dangerous to our health but limited exposure surgical gloves, breather masks and good habits with plenty of hand-washing can help. Working with lead should only be done on a disposable surface. Most important NEVER MELT LEAD!

I have a couple of fellow modelers that have used powered tungsten in locomotives and it really helps but the powder is really messy and is hard to clean up.

Just my 2 cents!

Ben in Denver


---In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <stmfc@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
On 10/28/2013 6:40 AM, Andy Carlson wrote:
depleted U you will notice it is nearly the same as elemental tungsten

Checked the site and the cheapest tungsten is $3.25 an ounce ($52 a pound). Great for N scale and good for HO if you need more space for other items, like sound decoders. Or if there is a loco pulling contest someplace and you just have to win! :-D
--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Red Devil Coal Loader

bierglaeser@...
 

Richard,

I, too, have been looking for useful modeling information on the Red Devil coalers and have found nothing.   I've gone through hundreds of issues of Railway Age, Railway Mechanical Engineer and the like.  No luck!  I surely hope you come up with a new search idea that bears fruit.

Gene Green 



---In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

Well, to be really precise, I really would like a photo or drawing of the Red Devil on the Colorado & Southern in Fort Collins, Colorado.  I have found nothing useful at the Colorado Railroad Museum (although that does not mean there isn't anything useful in this regard there: I just didn't find it).  I have some photos with the Red Devil hazily in the background, or largely obscured by a locomotive.  With this specificity failure, I want to be able to show, generically, what a Red Devil looked like.  That's why I asked about promotional material, as I suspect they might have a more or less generic photo or drawing. That partial diagram looks like it could be useful if it were an entire diagram, but it isn't.  This is for a steam era history of the C&S between Denver and Cheyenne.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


-----Original Message-----
From: Bruce F. Smith <smithbf@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Mon, Oct 28, 2013 6:15 pm
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Red Devil Coal Loader

 
Richard,

A simple Google search with "red devil coal loader" generates a number of photos of these loaders, including a partial diagram as well as some conversations on other forums.  That in turn indicates that "no two were the same" a phenomenon I have also observed with Fairbanks Morse and other similar coal loaders.  It would therefore be useful for you to specify in more detail exactly what you are looking for.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
 


Re: double sheathed & single sheathed - most common in the early 195os

al_brown03
 

The photo of ACL 26007 in Goolsby's book (also published in Lines South 10/89) is the only one I've seen of the rebuilt USRA SS cars (ACL class O-28). I've never seen a photo of an unrebuilt ACL USRA SS box: I'm guessing only the 22 that were rebuilt were received from the AB&C in good enough shape to be worth it.


ACL's own single-sheathed class was O-16, originally ACL 47000-50699: USRA "clones" with 8'5" IH and 7/8 "Murphy" ends. Photos appear in LS 10/89; MRG 2/88 p 13; and FFC 1 p 7. These were all rebuilt by the early 40s, into steel-sided cars in classes O-16-A through O-16-F. Double-door: ACL 55000-55499 (O-16-A), 55500-56499 (O-16-B), 56500-57499 (O-16-C). Single-door: ACL 27000-27479 (O-16-D), 27580-28133 (O-16-E), 28200-28299 (O-16-F). There are numerous published photos; the best discussions are probably those in the LS and FFC articles already cited. 


Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.




---In STMFC@..., <stmfc@...> wrote:

There is a picture of an ACL rebuild in Ted's Box and Auto Car Reference manual.  I don't have it here in front of me, but I know there is at least one picture in there.


Aaron Gjermundson



---In stmfc@..., <abrown@...> wrote:

There's definitely at least one published photo of an ACL rebuild. I'll look it up tonight when I get home, if someone else doesn't do so first.

 

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla. 


Re: Red Devil Coal Loader

Richard Townsend
 

Well, to be really precise, I really would like a photo or drawing of the Red Devil on the Colorado & Southern in Fort Collins, Colorado.  I have found nothing useful at the Colorado Railroad Museum (although that does not mean there isn't anything useful in this regard there: I just didn't find it).  I have some photos with the Red Devil hazily in the background, or largely obscured by a locomotive.  With this specificity failure, I want to be able to show, generically, what a Red Devil looked like.  That's why I asked about promotional material, as I suspect they might have a more or less generic photo or drawing. That partial diagram looks like it could be useful if it were an entire diagram, but it isn't.  This is for a steam era history of the C&S between Denver and Cheyenne.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


-----Original Message-----
From: Bruce F. Smith
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, Oct 28, 2013 6:15 pm
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Red Devil Coal Loader

 
Richard,

A simple Google search with "red devil coal loader" generates a number of photos of these loaders, including a partial diagram as well as some conversations on other forums.  That in turn indicates that "no two were the same" a phenomenon I have also observed with Fairbanks Morse and other similar coal loaders.  It would therefore be useful for you to specify in more detail exactly what you are looking for.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
 


Re: double sheathed & single sheathed - most common in the early 195os

Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <npin53@...> wrote:

There is a picture of an ACL rebuild in Ted's Box and Auto Car
Reference manual. I don't have it here in front of me, but I know
there is at least one picture in there.

Aaron Gjermundson

Actually there are two photos in Ted's book, both on page #35 and
both rebuilds with steel sides. YThe upper one is C&WC #8221 and the lower one is ACL #46683. The caption material claims the ACL received
950 cars while the C&WC received 300, all from ACF. No mention is made of the cars being inherited with the AB&C or any other road purchased but does note that the shrank 2 inches in height when rebuilt with their original roofs to become Class O-14-A.

I'd still like to see a good, clear photo of one paintged and lettered for the Atlanta, Birmingham & Coast.

Cordially, Don Valentine


AB brake sets similar to Cal Scale

ed_mines
 

Who makes them? . I find Tichy AB sets hard to work with. Cal Scale sets are pricy if you get them from Bowser.

 

Does Bowser offer any less expensive AB brake sets which are a part in their own kits?

 

Ed Mines

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