Date   
Re: A nice end shot, but the reporting marks are missing

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Don't forget the round roof...
 
  -  Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
From: abrown@...
Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2013 3:42 PM
Subject: [STMFC] RE: A nice end shot, but the reporting marks are missing

Double sheathed (or conceivably steel), 5/5/5 "Murphy" end, power handbrake as stated, dad-straight retainer line, end ladder *grabs* not ladder, Carmer cut lever, number begins in "13". Gentlemen, open your ORERs!

 

Al Brown, Melbourne,  Fla.

 

P.S. The end and the cut lever make me think "USRA".

 

Gulf Refining tank cars in 1929

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,

Gulf Refining tank cars in 1929.

http://tinyurl.com/m33yvw8

- Claus Schlund

Re: outstanding article on freight cars

Michael Evans
 

Jerry, thanks for the additional info.
Mike Evans

--- In STMFC@..., "switchengines" <jrs060@...> wrote:

Armand, Mike, I can help you both better understand how the cars traveled in
service for the Barrett Company. First, as has been pointed out by Mike, one
should remember that the cars did not go into service until the very late 1940s,
so someone modeling the traffic is going to have to understand that this very
interesting and colorful car came on the scene a bit late in time.
The cars were loaded in Wisconsin, don't know where exactly, but the present
day traffic comes to the Chicago area on the CN (WC). During the time remit of
this list, it may have been the C&NW that was bringing them to Chicago area, but
they were holding them on a lease track for Barrett at the C&NW 40th. Street yard
in Chicago until billing furtherance was received by the railroad for movement to
a Barrett roofing manufacturing plant. As can be seen in Mike's list below, it
seems that a slate quarry in Vermont was also producing the graduals for Barrett,
that makes a lot of senses because it was desirable to have different colors to
make the different colored roofing shingles. The billing of the cars to Blue Island
(that would be to the IHB agent) also would be in line with the regular practices of
the day, the IHB having received billing furtherance or holding instructions for the
car and being in a perfect position to interchange the car to any Chicago railroad.
From what I know about the Barrett Companys' operations most of the roofing
products manufacturing plants were in the heartland or eastern part of the US,
indeed one was in Chicago on the Illinois Northern. I doubt any of the cars went
farther west than Kansas City or so, if they even had any operation at all there?
Now it's kinda fun to know that some would be on the Rutland, and the cars were
not doubt moving eastward to another Barrett plant in NJ, as they did have one
there, but I think I would not want to overdue it and have too many of them? But
it looks to be a fun kitbash car.

Jerry Stewart


--- In STMFC@..., "Michael Evans" <michael.evans78@> wrote:


Armand,
This is what Andy pulled from his records, it is from Jan, Feb & Mar 1953. This batch was the only one he has checked so far. They were interchanged between D&H and Rut at Rouses Point.

1/7, BMX843, fr Poultney, VT to Chicago, IL, Slate Granuals
2/5, BMX803, fr Poultney, VT to Chicago, Il, Slate Granuals
2/22, BMX803, fr Blue Island, Il, to Poultney, Vt, mty
3/3, BMX803, fr Poultney, Vt to Chicago, Il, Slale Granuals
3/24, BMX860, fr Blue Island, IL to Poultney Vt, mty
3/31, BMX860, fr Poultney, Vt to Chicago, Il, Slate Granuals

Remember, these cars did not go into service until 1949.
Hope this helps,
Mike Evans

--- In STMFC@..., "Armand Premo" <armprem2@> wrote:

Mike,Your article brought out my aborted effort to build this car.It was back on the shelve waiting to be finished or tossed.Your excellent article gave my feeble attempt new life.Thank you. You mentioned the routing of these cars over the O&LC.I have a rather sizable collection of Rutland wheel reports dating back to 1942 and have yet to find any of these cars on any of these consists.If you have some dates to help me narrow my search I would be very appreciative.BTW your layout also expresses your skills as an outstanding modeler.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: Michael Evans
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 3:58 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: outstanding article on freight cars




Guys, thanks for all the kind words on my Barretts cov hop article, it is appreciated.

I am trying to find out more info on the routing of these cars, if anybody has any info.

From interchange reports I know some of them were routed from the D&H to the Rutland RR at Rutland VT, up the Rut, across the OL&C div, on to Chicago. The Bob Collins color photo shows one going south on Richmondville hll, and I have read here that some showed up on the PENN.

I am not even sure if Barretts used all the granulated slate for themselves, or if the sold them to other roofing mfg.

Thanks for any info,
Mike Evans

Nitric acid tank car

Paolo Roffo
 

Would anyone here happen to have any more details about this odd tank car at museum in Saint Louis:
The museum's web site is lacking on details other than the 1940 build date.  I'm interested in how many were built and how long they stayed in service, if anyone has those details.

thanks
Paolo Roffo

Re: A nice end shot, but the reporting marks are missing

al_brown03
 

Double sheathed (or conceivably steel), 5/5/5 "Murphy" end, power handbrake as stated, dad-straight retainer line, end ladder *grabs* not ladder, Carmer cut lever, number begins in "13". Gentlemen, open your ORERs!

 

Al Brown, Melbourne,  Fla.

 

P.S. The end and the cut lever make me think "USRA".

 

<vroom>

A nice end shot, but the reporting marks are missing

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,

A nice end shot, but the reporting marks are missing. Any thoughts? Interesting the car has a geared hand brake at this early (1936) date...

http://tinyurl.com/m3v4v72

- Claus Schlund

Re: Intermountain alt std twin hoppers (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Guys;

I have just been drooling over this car. It has been executed VERY nicely. I love the interior detailing, and the delicacy of the grabs and end details. Kudos to all that have contributed data and photos for IM to work with!

I have been seeing all the discussion going on, on the B&O list, on the ex-C&O cars that went to the B&O, but I was wondering if any of you know if IM intends on doing other variants, for other roads, that aren't on the current list?

I am especially interested in the later versions of the C&O, Erie, Montour (i.e., "MTR"), Shawmut, and P&WV cars. Did any of you send IM photos for those?

Thanks (and about ready to empty my wallet),

Elden Gatwood

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Re: Placards 2

Tony Thompson
 

michael gross wrote:

Thanks for the clarification about the placards.  Thanks for the link to your blog.

I was curious about these placards, because I also have several I would like to share with the group.  Several of them are steam era tank car placards, which is interesting in light of the new Tangent triple dome model.  Do you, Tony, or others in the group have suggestions as to the best way to disseminate the photos?  I would be happy to set up a folder in the photo section unless there is a better way.

Tony, your blog is so informative, and the graphics so professional, that I would be happy to send them to you if you want to share them with others.
My only desire is to make them available to as many members as care to have them.

    Thanks for the kind words, Michael. I would like to see your placards (or scans of them). As it happens, there was a terrific article in _Mainline Modeler_ in 1993 by John Ryczkowski about tank car placards, and I abstracted that information, and showed prototype placards, in an earlier post. I followed that up with a post about model placards (it contains a link to the post about prototype placards). If you're interested, here is a link to that second post:


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




Re: Placards 2

michaelegross <michaelEGross@...>
 

Dear Tony,

Thanks for the clarification about the placards.  Thanks for the link to your blog.

I was curious about these placards, because I also have several I would like to share with the group.  Several of them are steam era tank car placards, which is interesting in light of the new Tangent triple dome model.  Do you, Tony, or others in the group have suggestions as to the best way to disseminate the photos?  I would be happy to set up a folder in the photo section unless there is a better way.

Tony, your blog is so informative, and the graphics so professional, that I would be happy to send them to you if you want to share them with others.

My only desire is to make them available to as many members as care to have them.

Cheers!

Michael

Michael Gross
La Cañada, CA

Re: New York Central Milk Car

Craig Bisgeier
 

>
> Hi again folks

> I've been looking hard at photos of the Railworks NYC milk car I found online, and I have a question: It appears that there is a metal plate with two vertical grab irons on it covering up the lower 40% or so of the center doors.  At first I thought these were reinforcements of the doors but on close examination it appears to be a single panel. The detail below it seems to suggest that it could be hinged at the bottom edge to swing down and out of the way, possibly to a 90 degree angle making what might be a platform of sorts?  At any rate, it appears that it would be in the way of moving things in and out of the car if left in position... Am I seeing this correctly?  Any opinions or factual answers greatly appreciated.
>  
> Craig Bisgeier
> Clifton, NJ
>


  Having swung enough full 40 qt. milk cans into a cooler, out of a cooler and/or onto the back of a truck and then unloaded them at a creamery ("country station" in milk parlance) in my life I strongly suspect that all you are seeing is some sheet metal applied to the lower part of the doors to prevent them from being beat up too badly by folks swinging cans into or out of the milk cars. You see the outside of the doors. My money says the inside probably had the same treatment for the same reason. It was sometimes found on the wall beside the small can door at creamereies as well, or there was a piece of angle iron put over the vertical corners of the door frame.

Cordially, Don Valentine - still a farmer at heart.


Thanks Don, I expected that as well - except on close examination there is no apparent gap in the plate where the doors meet at the center, indicating one of two things: Either the plate has to swing down to allow the doors to open (if the open outward) OR there is a rather glaring mistake in the Railworks model....

I'm inclined to think it's a mistake as your explanation seems far more likely.
 

Re: P&N Box Car Sale by GC&L Photo Posted

Douglas Harding
 

Curt, its in the files section.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

Re: P&N Box Car Sale by GC&L Photo Posted

Curt Fortenberry
 

 

Where is it posted?  I don't see it in the photos section.

 

Curt Fortenberry

(No subject)

Staffan Ehnbom <staffan.ehnbom@...>
 

The GN called their version "movable door post" and it moved with the auxiliary door. Would it make it possible to nail grain doors to the double doors with this arrangement?
 
Staffan Ehnbom
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2013 3:26 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC]

 


The 'centerpiece' has what looks like a door roller on the bottom.
Did it move with a door or not?

Tim O'

>Hi Tom,
>These were Automobile cars which had a removable centerpiece between the doors. See RP Cycl. # 13 and/or Railmodeljournal Dec. 2004
>page 53-58. (downloadable through Trainlife.com)
>Ben de Vries
>

Re: Placards 2

s shaffer
 

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Placards 2


John Allen once showed us a boxcar that he had rigged up to simulate a hot box.He often put it in trains for guest operators.It consisted of a ramp and a metal ball-.A small red light was hidden under the car.If the car was handled too roughly coupling or in a train,the ball would be dislodged and would roll down the ramp completing the circuit .The light would come on indicating a hot box.Armand Premo

I have one. Walthers offered it as a kit some years ago. Around the same time as the peanut car, beer can tank car, Jail Box...

Steve Shaffer

Re: Placards 2

s shaffer
 

Subject: [STMFC] Re: Placards 2



An explosives placard is included in the set of placards Richard Hendrickson
designed for Microscale. I used that placard on a box car that was to be used
on the club layout for delivery to mining and quarry operations.

Tim O'
I need one of those explosives placards. In the late Fred Dabney's collection is a Lionel exploding boxcar that he had repainted and modified such that it would "blow up" under rough train handling conditions. Caught more than a few members at the club.

Steve Shaffer

Re: New CNWHS Modeler-- Questions on the M&StL USRA Double Sheathed

Clark Propst
 

Gary,
The short answer is someone must have screwed up. To be honest I never paid much attention to that article, in print.
I did a series of four M&StL freight car articles I thought would run consecutively, they didn’t. By the time (years) that DS article first rev arrived I’d learn more and had redone several of the models. I started sending new photos to them (CNWHS team), but was focused on something else at the time and never sent them all or much in the way of updated text before they published it. I usually receive several revs before publication this time they were on the ball and put the issue out in record time.
It appears that the black ends and roofs were a 1939 thing. No photos before then or after show a difference in colors...We’re talking b/w photos. To explain a bit more, the railroad was buying a lot of used cars in the late 30s-early 40s and only those received and upgraded during 39 seemed to get the black ends and roofs.
If you have any specific questions I will be happy to answer if I can and send photos.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

(No subject)

Tim O'Connor
 

The 'centerpiece' has what looks like a door roller on the bottom.
Did it move with a door or not?

Tim O'

Hi Tom,
These were Automobile cars which had a removable centerpiece between the doors. See RP Cycl. # 13 and/or Railmodeljournal Dec. 2004
page 53-58. (downloadable through Trainlife.com)
Ben de Vries

(No subject)

de Vries <bjdevries01@...>
 

Hi Tom,
These were Automobile cars which had a removable centerpiece between the doors.  See RP Cycl. # 13 and/or Railmodeljournal Dec. 2004
page 53-58. (downloadable through Trainlife.com)
Ben de Vries
 
 

Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2013 2:47 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC]
 
 

Tim,

Thank you for your response.  Looking at the photo more closely now, I can imagine that is the case.  It certainly looks a bit odd but would make an interesting model.

Tom Baker

From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...] on behalf of Tim O'Connor [timboconnor@...]
Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2013 7:34 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC]



Tom

It's part of the left hand door. I don't know why they were built
that way -- perhaps they couldn't buy a factory made door of the width
they needed so they welded an extension onto it?

Tim O'


In perusing an old Newton K. Gregg Train Shed Cyclopedia No. 17, on page 136, I examined a photo of a Milwaukee Road double-door ribbed box car.  The arrangement of the double doors puzzles me: The ends that would normally be up tight against each other do not touch. But instead of a visible opening into the car, there seems to be a segment of the carside visible.

Can anyone explain how such an arrangement, unless my eyes deceive me, functioned?  The car is displayed in Figure 2.153 and has the road number 6582.
Thanks in advance for any assistance someone might be able to offer.

Tom Baker


(No subject)

Thomas Baker
 

Tim,

Thank you for your response.  Looking at the photo more closely now, I can imagine that is the case.  It certainly looks a bit odd but would make an interesting model.

Tom Baker


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...] on behalf of Tim O'Connor [timboconnor@...]
Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2013 7:34 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC]



Tom

It's part of the left hand door. I don't know why they were built
that way -- perhaps they couldn't buy a factory made door of the width
they needed so they welded an extension onto it?

Tim O'


In perusing an old Newton K. Gregg Train Shed Cyclopedia No. 17, on page 136, I examined a photo of a Milwaukee Road double-door ribbed box car.  The arrangement of the double doors puzzles me: The ends that would normally be up tight against each other do not touch. But instead of a visible opening into the car, there seems to be a segment of the carside visible.

Can anyone explain how such an arrangement, unless my eyes deceive me, functioned?  The car is displayed in Figure 2.153 and has the road number 6582.
Thanks in advance for any assistance someone might be able to offer.

Tom Baker


Re: New York Central Milk Car

Donald B. Valentine
 

--- In STMFC@..., Craig Bisgeier <cbisgeier@...> wrote:

Hi again folks

I've been looking hard at photos of the Railworks NYC milk car I found online, and I have a question: It appears that there is a metal plate with two vertical grab irons on it covering up the lower 40% or so of the center doors.  At first I thought these were reinforcements of the doors but on close examination it appears to be a single panel. The detail below it seems to suggest that it could be hinged at the bottom edge to swing down and out of the way, possibly to a 90 degree angle making what might be a platform of sorts?  At any rate, it appears that it would be in the way of moving things in and out of the car if left in position... Am I seeing this correctly?  Any opinions or factual answers greatly appreciated.
 
Craig Bisgeier
Clifton, NJ

Having swung enough full 40 qt. milk cans into a cooler, out of a cooler and/or onto the back of a truck and then unloaded them at a creamery ("country station" in milk parlance) in my life I strongly suspect that all you are seeing is some sheet metal applied to the lower part of the doors to prevent them from being beat up too badly by folks swinging cans into or out of the milk cars. You see the outside of the doors. My money says the inside probably had the same treatment for the same reason. It was sometimes found on the wall beside the small can door at creamereies as well, or there was a piece of angle iron put over the vertical corners of the door frame.

Cordially, Don Valentine - still a farmer at heart.