Date   

Re: New York Central USRA 50-ton gondola paint color

Walter Cox
 

It might have something to do with the formulation of the red paint. I can recall my Dad, who was in the Navy from around 1924 to 1945, mentioning a red lead type of paint primer used to inhibit rust. Also, add CN to the list of railroads making the switch during that period. 
 Walt
 
In a message dated 1/15/2014 11:46:24 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, riverman_vt@... write

Could the fact that red paint would not show the results of initial rust have anything to do with the change from black? Did not a number of railraods change their hopper car color from black to read somewhere in the 1925 to 1945 time frame as well, i.e. Lehigh Valley, Pennsy, New Haven and Western Maryland as well as the NYC?

Cordially, Don Valentine


Which Class of Santa Fe Reefers had the wide doors and two full length straps?

gary laakso
 

The better picture is at:
 
 
It is a very big car compared to the other refrigerator cars in the train. 



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Watermelons to Pocatello!

gary laakso
 

The ventilated refrigerator car behind the UP 4-12-2 appears to be a Seaboard car:
 
 
This one must have gone over Sherman Hill! 
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock



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Re: AC&F Type 27

water.kresse@...
 

Thanks David!  Happy New Year!  Al Kresse



From: jaydeet2001@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 12:47:45 PM
Subject: [STMFC] RE: AC&F Type 27

DT&I gon with auto frames?
 http://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1946-Aug-Echo-to-Green-River/i-xV3zdmW/A
 

 Six-dome tank car:
 http://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1946-Aug-Echo-to-Green-River/i-j8gGk2V/A
 

 More tank car fun:
 http://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Emil-Albrecht-Photos/1946-Aug-Echo-to-Green-River/i-J269twF/A

 

 


Re: Unusual WFE Car

Bill Welch
 

Fruit Growers Express' Indiana Harbor shops built 100 steel sheathed 50-foot overhead bunker cars and fifty copies for Western Fruit in 1950, their first and only such examples of the type. They were equipped with 6-ft "sliding flush doors," the correct term for the period. Their reporting marks were FOBX and WOBX respectively. FGE owned 200 plywood "OB's" also built from 1944 through 1946. Their first 10 cars were built in 1940 and were steel sheathed, two horizontal riveted panels on each side of the hinged doors. Their primary purpose was to ship frozen commodities using a brine solution.


The FGE/WFE/BRE System issued special instructions for icing these cars as to the tools used to service the ten ice bunkers--no sharp points. It took several minutes to ice and re-ice them. The cars served as an interim solution to the demand for frozen commodities while FGE/WFE/BRE System experimented with various mechanical systems, and by 1951 committed to the mechanical system developed by the Frigidaire Division of GM to equip their mechanical cars. By 1957 the System operated over 1200 Mechs yet their OB's continued to be loaded with frozen commodities.


The Plywood OBs are not likely to be confused with any other car and are certainly a good candidate for 3D Printing development.


Bill Welch


Re: Stubborn Projects

Mikebrock
 

Marty McGuirk writes:

"Ever have one project that seemed to have one problem after another?"

Well...one comes to mind. Prototype Rails 2014.

Mike Brock


Re: Unusual WFE Car

Tony Thompson
 

Rod Miller wrote:

Ihttp://www.mashpedia.com/videoplayer.php?q=52D1xs_hc_k

at 09:12 what appears to be a GN WFE plug door car appears.
It has a row of five "hatches" on each side of the roof. I
wasn't able to make out the road number. Can someone please
provide info on that car?


     Unless I'm missing something, it looks like a standard FGE overhead bunker car, probably FHIX.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Unusual WFE Car

Bruce Smith
 

Rod,

I really doubt that!  This appears to be a top bunker ice reefer. Many refrigerator car lines experimented with them, but the Canadians are known for the largest fleet. The concept was that by keeping the ice on top of the load, the cooled air would naturally descend and it would be more efficient.  Here's an FGE top bunker car

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."


On Jan 15, 2014, at 2:58 PM, Rod Miller wrote:

On 1/15/14 11:26 AM, Rod Miller wrote:
In

http://www.mashpedia.com/videoplayer.php?q=52D1xs_hc_k

at 09:12 what appears to be a GN WFE plug door car appears.
It has a row of five "hatches" on each side of the roof. I
wasn't able to make out the road number. Can someone please
provide info on that car?

TIA

Rod

Discussed this with a friend who followed the SP&S. He
said that some reefers were modified for bulk loading
such as grain and sand, so the car in the vid may be one
of those.

Rod

--

Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives,  |   O Scale West / S West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More     |   2014 Meet is Feb 6 - 8
http://www.rodmiller.com               |   http://www.oscalewest.com


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Railroad Prototype Modelers-Valley Forge

prr282
 

Railroad Prototype Modelers-Valley Forge is returning to the Desmond Hotel in Malvern PA (about 20 miles west of Philadelphia and convenient to the PA Turnpike and US 202), the same great site as previous years, on March 28-30, 2014.  Over 50 different clinics will be presented, along with operating sessions, vendors room, models display room, and a home layout tour.  Visit our web site for full information:

www.phillynmra.org/rpmmeet.html

There you will find lists of clinics and vendors, complete timetable, hotel information, and a registration form.

 

Paul Backenstose

Chairman

 


Re: Unusual WFE Car

Rod Miller
 

On 1/15/14 11:26 AM, Rod Miller wrote:
In

http://www.mashpedia.com/videoplayer.php?q=52D1xs_hc_k

at 09:12 what appears to be a GN WFE plug door car appears.
It has a row of five "hatches" on each side of the roof. I
wasn't able to make out the road number. Can someone please
provide info on that car?

TIA

Rod
Discussed this with a friend who followed the SP&S. He
said that some reefers were modified for bulk loading
such as grain and sand, so the car in the vid may be one
of those.

Rod

--

Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale West / S West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2014 Meet is Feb 6 - 8
http://www.rodmiller.com | http://www.oscalewest.com


Re: Reading boxcar series 101000-102999

Larry Kline
 

I neglected to change the address to Larry Sexton's address.

Larry Kline


Re: Reading boxcar series 101000-102999

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

They are different because they are on a USRA inspired underframe just like a lot of contemporary NYC all-steel cars were. The best spotting feature for cars like these is the 2x3 rivet pattern on the side sill at the body bolster. No photo, but ends are flat.
 
Eric N. 

Does anyone have a photo of any Reading boxcar in series 101000-102999 they’d be willing to provide me a scan. I’m trying to create a model of one these cars which, at first look, appear to be similar to a PRR x-29 boxcar. Except for the 6” difference in height. There may be other differences as well that I haven’t spotted yet. I have a side shot but no ¾ or end view. Any help would be appreciated and thanks in advance.

Larry Sexton

Crystal River, FL  


Re: Reading boxcar series 101000-102999

Larry Kline
 

You probably have the photo and roster on Ted's old web site.

Two more photos are attached

Larry Kline



Wed Jan 15, 2014 10:25 am (PST) . Posted by:

"Larry Sexton"

Does anyone have a photo of any Reading boxcar in series 101000-102999
they‚d be willing to provide me a scan. I‚m trying to create a model of one
these cars which, at first look, appear to be similar to a PRR x-29 boxcar.
Except for the 6‰ difference in height. There may be other differences as
well that I haven‚t spotted yet. I have a side shot but no ≤ or end view.
Any help would be appreciated and thanks in advance.


Re: Stubborn Projects

asychis@...
 

Many times, Marty.  Mostly when I run up against a problem scratchbuildng a certain part or a difficult assembly procedure.  However, I find that if I put it away and move on to something else for a week, month or year, when I finally come back, the problem seems less daunting.  Resin kits seem to be the worst.  I have some B&O wagontop boxcars that have been "aging" in the closet for a couple of years. Just have not bee able to get the correct "hang" to the sides.  Hmmm, maybe this weekend while watching Denver?
 
Jerry Michels


Re: MStL 63001s, 65001s

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

I checked C&IW and C&IM for 1930 and 1940. Only one series turned up, C&IW 6500-6599. I'm not sure where these came from but they're not in the 7-70 ORER, so probably secondhand.
 
Eric N.
 

People's gas also was part owner of the short line Chicago and Illinois Western. The period in question is outside of my era but has anyone checked the cars against the C&IW roster or one of the other owning companies rosters?
 
Furthermore, in checking what I do have,It would seem to be odd that the number series would overlay the C&IW hoppers I have shown in the IC system roster for 1945. More interesting is one whole series and part of anther is leased to the C&IM
 
Sorry I have nothing definite but maybe jog some memories.
 
Mark Rickert
 
 


Re: New York Central USRA 50-ton gondola paint color

John Riba
 

Hello Everybody,

 The NYC USRA gondolas were rebuilt around 1938. They looked like all the other 40' gons with steel sides 4'10" high (no diagonal ribs). After rebuilding they did not look like USRA gondolas. They were lot # 379-G, 381-G,389-G,398-G,399-G,400-G,401-G,403-G. In 1940 they were still lettered for Michigan Central and NYC. This would mean they would be painted black when USRA style. The black paint was begun with new hoppers after 1940.

John

'



From: Jeff Pellas To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2014 6:02 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] New York Central USRA 50-ton gondola paint color

 
I once read an anecdotal account of how hoppers of the NYC first started being painted red. Take this with a grain of salt but what I read was that, when the NYC began rebuilding their vast USRA hopper fleet in the 1930s, the shops at Avis were where the first red ones originated. The reason for the color change was simply due to a surplus of red paint. Corporate  management had to approve the use of red before it was actually applied but once it was, it was then decided to adopt red as the color of all hoppers new or rebuilt going forward. Whether or not this account is factual, what it illustrates is an adaptive or flexible approach to car rebuilding that was probably necessitated by the greatly increased traffic loads as the US began exporting goods to Europe prior to America officially entering the War. I imagine railroads wouldn't hold up a rebuild program because they were out of a particular color of paint. It is also probable that similar cars (like the USRA gons) were being rebuilt at various locations around the vast NYC system resulting in paint variations.     
Jeff
jppellas@...


-----Original Message-----
From: RUTLANDRS
To: STMFC
Sent: Tue, Jan 14, 2014 11:44 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] New York Central USRA 50-ton gondola paint color



Eric,
    When you figure it out let me know. I'm still convinced that in 48 the panel side hoppers were still black, at least mine is.
Chuck Hladik
 
In a message dated 1/14/2014 11:28:51 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, eric@... writes:
 
Thanks Chuck, I have noted that info, which has spurred my question on this model. If black is proper for NYC gondolas before 1941, then why has Intermountain done a few runs of these models with as-built lettering and brown/red paint? Is there something specific to the paint for this car design? Or has Intermountain chosen to paint these in the wrong color (a few times) for the as-built versions? 

Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX





Re: Reading boxcar series 101000-102999

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jan 15, 2014, at 10:25 AM, Larry Sexton <SSEXTON9@...> wrote:

Does anyone have a photo of any Reading boxcar in series 101000-102999 they’d be willing to provide me a scan. I’m trying to create a model of one these cars which, at first look, appear to be similar to a PRR x-29 boxcar. Except for the 6” difference in height. There may be other differences as well that I haven’t spotted yet. I have a side shot but no ¾ or end view. Any help would be appreciated and thanks in advance.
Larry, I’m sending you off-list scans of several photos.  I haven’t included the three shots I have which are broadsides, but I am sending views which illustrate both ends, the roof, and the air brake arrangement (on cars re-fitted with AB brakes).  You’ll note that the sides were 8 panel., the roofs were Murphy flat steel, the ends were flat riveted like the PRR X28 and X29 classes, and the original doors were Youngstown corrugated (later replaced on some [all?] cars with Superior 7-panel).  Modeling these cars won’t be easy!


Richard Hendrickson



Re: Early, but definitely steam era

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

It's probably not news to most of you, but safety appliances were hardly standard industry wide until the Safety Appliance Act of 1911. Cars which met the standard were marked "United States Safety Appliances Standard". I'm not sure how quickly railroads responded to the new standard, but I was able to study an 1890s P&R boxcar body placed at Rushland, PA. Extensive modifications were made to bring this car into compliance despite being removed from revenue service no later than 1915. As originally built, the car had hand brakes at both ends. When there wasn't a single hand brake near the back left corner with the brake cylinder facing the hand brake, the brake system would rearranged. So, if you are operating a car after 1920 that was built before 1911, you may notice a difference from the original brake arrangement as well as a change in location of hand holds. I think the act also specified running board width.
 
Eric N.
 
 


Almost forgot to mention, look at the corner grabs on the roofs as well. All but two appear to be little more than a 24 in. grab mounted at a 45 degree angle across the corner. The first exception is the car immediately behind the caboose on which the grab shows just to the left of the stack on the caboose. This one appears to be parallel with the running boards. The second is St.L.R.C. #433, the Annheuser-Busch car, that appears to have either one or two grabs forming a 90 degree angle as was commonly used later. There may be a third excception with a parallel grab on the car just behind St.L.R.C. #433 but it is difficult to see. have never seen even an early or period modwl with grabs so positioned, however.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Stubborn Projects

Tony Thompson
 

Armand Premo wrote:

    Funny you should bring that up Marty.I am currently working on a kit that is basically wooden with a resin roof , styrene and metal parts.The instructions call for drilling some 126 holes of various sizes.Dimensions are given in decimals,fractions and scale.Can anyone suggest a common adhesive that will bond all the various materials? Struggling with a kit from hell.Armand Premo__._,_.__._,___


      Armand, as I always observe, canopy glue gives me the best results with dissimilar materials like you mention. You can read my comments at:


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Stubborn Projects

Armand Premo
 


    Funny you should bring that up Marty.I am currently working on a kit that is basically wooden with a resin roof , styrene and metal parts.The instructions call for drilling some 126 holes of various sizes.Dimensions are given in decimals,fractions and scale.Can anyone suggest a common adhesive that will bond all the various materials? Struggling with a kit from hell.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
To: STMFC
Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2014 1:02 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Stubborn Projects

 

Ever have one of those projects that fights with you all the way? That’s been the case with a certain otherwise non-descript Sunshine Cotton Belt double-sheathed boxcar. I started building it back in October 2001. I remember that since it was my “hotel room” project while I was in Colorado and my family was back in Wisconsin. I remember the underframe didn’t quite fit and took a fair amount of sanding to get it to seat in place inside the bottom. I also remember struggling to get the roof to go on straight and level, and correcting the rather pronounced warp in one of the sides. Getting the basic “box” assembled square and straight was a challenge. But I did it, and put the car in the box and didn’t touch it again for several years. Somewhere along the line I learned the Sunshine directions didn’t give a lot specifics on the brake component arrangement – and I ended up redoing the brake rigging on the car back in 2005 or so, only to put it back in the box again.

In fact I only dug it out of the box a couple of weeks ago. I thought there was still a lot of work to finish it up, but all I had to do was add one lateral, install a pair of grabs to one of the sides, and install the uncoupling levers and brakewheel. Then I washed the car off and set it aside to dry.

Last Saturday I decided to paint the thing. I carefully mixed the paint, tested how it was spraying through my airbrush on a piece of scrap styrene. “Everything looks good” I thought. I placed the car in the spraybooth, aimed the airbrush at the center of the car, pulled the trigger…..and….managed to put a big splotch of paint spatter right in the middle of the side and along one side of the roof.

Perhaps I was out of practice (it's been a few years since I used an airbrush on anything other than track) and made what is frankly a rookie mistake. But maybe this thing is just cursed?

Ever have one project that seemed to have one problem after another?

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