Date   

Re: Railroad ties as car loads

granpa92@...
 

Interesting and informative video.

But, tell me one thing, how does a SEABOARD AIR LINE "watermelon" car
end up in Missouri hauling fresh cut railroad ties?

It looks like the serving RR comandered any and every car from any RR
they could to haul ties.

Thanks for sharing,

Larry Platt

-----Original Message-----
From: gary laakso <vasa0vasa@earthlink.net>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wed, Jan 29, 2014 1:08 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Railroad ties as car loads








This is a long vid but it features vintage equipment and lots of cheap,
hard labor
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=51AX8w9bt2I
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock




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Re: Intermountain AC 12

SUVCWORR@...
 

Try Intermountain they are pretty good about things like that.  Will most likely e-mail it to you

Rich Orr



-----Original Message-----
From: paul.doggett2472
To: STMFC
Sent: Sun, Feb 9, 2014 8:53 am
Subject: [STMFC] Intermountain AC 12



Hi I know this is not really the right site for this but I have bought an intermountain AC12 59005s off ebay  it has no instructions the vendor did state this in fairness to him, but has anyone any ideas where I can get the instructions from any help would be appreciated.
Thanks Paul Doggett
Engalnd



For sale

Bill McCoy
 

More cars for sale:

Intermountain 40' AAR 1937 single door Box car, NYC 175036, Red and Gray "Pacemaker 1960 renumber and Youngstown Door, NIB, RTR, 25.00

Intermountain ART Steel 40' Reefer, ART 33121, All yellow sides, MP/WAB monograms 1960-1963 paint scheme, Amarillo RR Museum/MP HS, NIB RTR 25.00

Intermountain Steel Reefer, 40', R40-25, NP 91329, Large NP monogram, "Route of the Vista Dome North Coast Limited", Amarillo Railroad Museum special, Kit, NIB, 16.00

Intermountain 40' Plywood Box car, GN 10897,  "See America First" monogram, Omaha Orange with Black Roof and Pullman Green sill, roof line stripes and side ladders, as built 1947 colors. NIB RTR, 25.00

  

I'll listen to reasonable offers, Contact me OFF LINE at wpmccoy@... or 717-288-2316. I prefer Pay Pal and will take personal checks. Any non US buyer must use Pay Pal. I use USPS Priority Mail. Please give me your Zip Code.

 

Thanks for looking.

 

Bill McCoy

Strasburg, PA 17579


S.L.R.X. 4400 series wood sides?

George Courtney
 

  I've got a photo of a SLRX (St. Louis Refrigerator Car Co.) reefer with wood sides.  It is numbered 4400 and a second photo of SLRX 4493.  The sides are painted white and the lettering black.  There is a note that the sides might have been plywood.  Can anyone confirm plywood sides or were they just regular, boarded, wood sides?


Thanks,

George Courtney


Re: width , length etc of diagonal panel vs murphy rectangular panel roof

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 9, 2014, at 6:42 AM, benjaminscanlon@... wrote:

I am making a master for a diagonally pressed boxcar roof, which I think is sometimes referred to as a 'Stanray' roof. 
 I noted comments here re the 'parallel universe' Athearn stock car one; thanks to Tony and Ben Hom for the heads up on that.  I'm working off a prototype photo of a heavily rusted Rock Island one. 
 I am wondering whether the width and length of this roof, and the cross rib positions, should match the Murphy rectangular panel roof?
Yes.  The diagonal recess in the panels was the only difference between the earlier rectangular panel roof and the later diagonal panel roof.  By the way, “Stanray” wasn't introduced as a trade name by the Standard Railway Equipment Co. until after the end of the stem era.  Prior to that, all of its various roof designs bore the name “Murphy."

 Also, I believe according to the promotional literature, they made both riveted and welded diagonal pressing roofs.  Not sure where the rivets were but I assume they were on each side of the cross ribs, running across the roof (??)
Yes.  The rivets passed through the sides of the inverted U-section seam caps and the vertical flanges on the edges of the panel sections which where enclosed by the seam caps.

 I am wondering which version was more common?
The rectangular panel roof was introduced in the early 1930s and by the early 1940s had become what amounted to an industry standard design, with only a small and diminishing number of RRs ordering cars with Viking corrugated or other competitive roofs.  Almost all of the thousands of steel cars built or rebuilt from the mid-1930s through the late 1940s had SRE’s rectangular panel roofs.  The diagonal panel roof was introduced in 1948 and quickly replaced the rectangular panel roof in the construction of new freight cars.  It then remained the industry standard through the 1950s and ‘60s.  So which was “more common” depends entirely on the era you model.    

Richard Hendrickson



LED CD lights

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

I know this is off topic, but I couldn't think of another place to ask. Please reply off list: eaneubauer@...
 
Has anyone had experience trying to hook up LED C9 lights to DC power? They could possibly be used to light the interior of a caboose. :-)
 
Eric N.


Semet Solvay Dome Platform

Mikebrock
 

Well, I would sooner play left offensive tackle for the Broncos without pads than do it again but I have managed to place a few photos in the photo section titled Semet Solvay Tank Car. The photos are of my attempt to model a dome platform on an Intermountain Semet Solvay tank car.

Mike Brock


Re: UP 155000

Eric Lombard
 

Guy and Brian,
Here is a service history for UP 155000 I have assembled from the ORER.

1940(4)         ...  Not listed in ORER.
1940               1  RENO from #154132 in 154100-154199.
1940(10)         1  XAP
1941(1)           1  XA with nailing strips that reduce IW to 8-2, IH to 10-0.
1942(1)           1  XAP back to original inside dimensions.
1942(4)           1  XAP
1943(1)           1  XA with nailing strips that reduce IW to 8-2, IH to 10-0.
1943(7)           1  XAP back to original inside dimensions.
1944(7)           1  XAP with Evans Unit Loader [inside cover Metcalf book]. No mention in ORER.
1945(1)           1  XAP
1945(5)           1  XAP
1946(1)           1  XAP
1946(10)         1  XAP
194x                   RENO back into 154100-154199?
1947(7)         ...  Not listed in ORER.

A glorious but short career with the Evans Unit Loader only post 7-1944?. No special equipment is noted for any year in the ORER except for the nailing strips that seem to come and go early on. So, Brian, it appears that the car as numbered does not make it to your modeling era.

Guy, can you steer me to some information on the Evans Unit Loader? Its a new bit of arcana for me and I would appreciate learning more about it.

Cheers,
Eric

Guy,


Re: width , length etc of diagonal panel vs murphy rectangular panel roof

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 


Someone correct me if I am wrong, but I think the general progession is:
 
Standard roof: flat with standing seams like the N&B/HCRC cars recently discussed.
Standard Improved roof: similar, with raised rectangular shape
Standard Diagonal roof: similar, with raised rectangular shape divided by a diagonal valley.
 
Each had it's period of use
 
I believe all of these had 41" wide sections. The distance across the roof assembly would depend of the body design, and there was more than one option, for example cars with flush or overhanging upper eaves.
 
I don't think the welded version was that common. Rivets vs. welds refer to the attachment to the sides and perhaps the seam between the panels.
 
Eric N.

I am making a master for a diagonally pressed boxcar roof, which I think is sometimes referred to as a 'Stanray' roof. 
 
I am wondering whether the width and length of this roof, and the cross rib positions, should match the Murphy rectangular panel roof?
 
Also, I believe according to the promotional literature, they made both riveted and welded diagonal pressing roofs.  Not sure where the rivets were but I assume they were on each side of the cross ribs, running across the roof (??)


width , length etc of diagonal panel vs murphy rectangular panel roof

Benjamin Scanlon
 

Hi

 

I am making a master for a diagonally pressed boxcar roof, which I think is sometimes referred to as a 'Stanray' roof. 

 

I noted comments here re the 'parallel universe' Athearn stock car one; thanks to Tony and Ben Hom for the heads up on that.  I'm working off a prototype photo of a heavily rusted Rock Island one. 

 

I am wondering whether the width and length of this roof, and the cross rib positions, should match the Murphy rectangular panel roof?

 

Also, I believe according to the promotional literature, they made both riveted and welded diagonal pressing roofs.  Not sure where the rivets were but I assume they were on each side of the cross ribs, running across the roof (??)

 

I am wondering which version was more common?

 

Regards,

 

Ben Scanlon

Tottenham Hale, England 


Intermountain AC 12

paul.doggett2472@...
 

Hi I know this is not really the right site for this but I have bought an intermountain AC12 59005s off ebay  it has no instructions the vendor did state this in fairness to him, but has anyone any ideas where I can get the instructions from any help would be appreciated.

Thanks Paul Doggett

Engalnd


GNW 100022

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

Taking another look at this car, I notice the reweigh was GV, not CV as I originally thought. Greenville did the repair work, their O.O. 797. Weight increased about 3,000 lbs which suggests beside replacing at least the draft arms, the floor was also strengthened. The built date matches B&O M-55b.
 
Eric N.


MANY Boxcars

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

There's another similar pair in there: LAPX 177 (series 152-181?) and CGBX 603 (series 601-614). The latter is apparently former LAPX 102-121 in 8-58. Both are Pressed Steel Car XT type with Duryea underframes. Despite the 70-ton trucks, the nominal capacity is only 62,000 lbs. because of the internal 6700 g tank.
 
Eric N.


Re: MANY Boxcars

davesnyder59
 

Thanks Guy, my fertile imagination was perusing restrictive service or movement or the like. Sometimes its just the simpler things.

Dave Snyder
Louisville, Ky.


Re: MANY Boxcars

dahminator68
 

Hello Steam Era Modelers:  I just wanted to add that the Westerfield 2900 series USRA cars are currently having mold work done but will be available again shortly.

However, the decal sets for N&B and HC RR are currently available on my website:  westerfieldmodels.com


Thank you,

Andrew Dahm

Westerfieldmodels@...


Re: Moisture trap for air brush

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...>
 

Install the trap as far down the airline as you can find a place to fit it. 

Industrial compressors often have after coolers which are intended to lower the temperature of the compressed air;  long pipe runs have a similar effect. Since any moisture in the air compressed will condense as the temperature drops, the trap should be fitted at the outlett of the after cooler or better still at the far end of the fixed line so that any condensation in the lines will also be removed.

If you have a fixed compressor then installing few feet of metal piping between the pump and the moisture trap and making your airbrush hose connection close to the trap would be very a good thing, especially in humid climates. While good units are not cheap,  automatic drain traps are also worth considering if you are running the compressor extensively, especially in damp climates, and these should be fitted at a low point in the piping as this is where the water tends to collect; unless you want a wet patch on the floor in the workshop, don't forget to install a tundish and drain to the outside as the trap will discharge slugs of water at intervals. 

For the person using a small hobby compressor in an apartment with the airbrush attached directly to the compressor, a system like this is probably overkill, but if you are doing a lot of painting and have a tank mounted compressor in a permanent place in a garage or workshop, then a few feet of iron piping and a drain trap might be a good investment

Aidrian 








in the line as you can 

On 9/02/2014, at 3:22 PM, <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

 

Some time back Bill Welch, if memory serves, initiated a discussion that eventually included the pros and cons of including a moisture trap in one's air brush setup.  Although the humidity in my layout building here has been a very consistent 20% and there was never any problem using an air brush sans moisture trap in El Paso, I decided a moisture trap was a good idea.  It arrived today.



As I recall (I can't find the original thread) someone suggested that a moisture trap is best positioned as low as possible.  The obvious and most convenient position for my moisture trap is immediately below my pressure regulator which is positioned outside my spray booth at about the same level as the air brush when it is in use.

Should the "plumbing" be rearranged to locate the moisture trap lower?
Should the moisture trap before the pressure regulator?

Gene Green



Re: MANY Boxcars

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

All the cast hardware had NYC cast into it, however they were built by ACF in 4=5-23 as UPCX 701-1000. After they were relettered, they continued to serve the same cement plant. The large roping staple was added after they were in service. The cars relettered HCRC served another plant (in Missouri I think) under the same ownership.
 
Eric N.
 

Eric,

I have a number of photos of the NB cars and another shot of an HCRR car. I knew these
were probably "USRA steel" cars or similar NYC cars, but are they ex-NYC or some other
original owner?

What a beautiful collection of photos!

Tim O'Connor



HCRR 881 and NB 757 bear an uncanny resemblance. Of course they would since HCRR 881 is former NB 881. These were built to an NYC design.
Eric N.


Re: Moisture trap for air brush

Tim O'Connor
 

Gene, the most logical explanation I read was that the moisture
condenses as the air cools -- so you want to put the trap where the
air is the coolest, which is close to the airbrush. At least, that's
how I understood it.

Air in winter in New England (like now) is dry as can be. In the
summer, it's very humid and I run the dehumidifier all the time. In
other words, I gave up trying to control air moisture a while ago.
If I have problems with it, then I only do weathering... :-)

Tim O'Connor

Some time back Bill Welch, if memory serves, initiated a discussion that eventually included the pros and cons of including a moisture trap in one's air brush setup. Although the humidity in my layout building here has been a very consistent 20% and there was never any problem using an air brush sans moisture trap in El Paso, I decided a moisture trap was a good idea. It arrived today.


As I recall (I can't find the original thread) someone suggested that a moisture trap is best positioned as low as possible. The obvious and most convenient position for my moisture trap is immediately below my pressure regulator which is positioned outside my spray booth at about the same level as the air brush when it is in use.

Should the "plumbing" be rearranged to locate the moisture trap lower?
Should the moisture trap before the pressure regulator?

Gene Green


Re: MANY Boxcars

Bill Welch
 

Al noted further in his history of the cars that they had rather massive roping staples welded on the sill. these were squarish chunks of steel with a long slot cut into them or perhaps cast that way. Regardless a spotting feature.


Bill Welch


N&B box car and hopper

hubert mask
 

Please watch for my announcements in the future for these two cars.


Hubert Mask

Mask Island Decals

70661 - 70680 of 192665