Date   

Re: one of N&W's battleship gons on the New Haven

water.kresse@...
 

Hey David,

 

Happy new Year!

 

I believe these were "over-light-weighted" so they could be truly called 100-ton cars (versus 90-tons for other N&W gons).  They relied on taking rolling or rocking bolster loads through the side-sills through adjustable wear plates.  They were last-built and first scrapped.

 

Al Kresse


From: jaydeet2001@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, February 10, 2014 3:39:46 PM
Subject: [STMFC] RE: one of N&W's battleship gons on the New Haven

Yep, N&W class GS built in 1920 and retired in the mid-30s. Looks like the top eave is rather wobbly on that one.
http://www.nwhs.org/archivesdb/detail.php?ID=19939

Hope New Haven had a big rotary dumper somewhere.
 

 David Thompson


Re: Barriger Photo Collection

water.kresse@...
 

Happy New Rich!   Thanks!   I do find some later liveries.  I need an automobile historian to ID the car in the foreground of a pier 9 pre-traveling bunkers, picture.  Al



From: cinderandeight@...
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, February 10, 2014 9:51:45 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Barriger Photo Collection

Al,
    The PRR Toledo Division collection shows many  construction photos
including the Detroit freight station under construction and  a pristine shot of
a brand new Pennfort Jct. tower.  That line opened in  1922.  Lots of
interesting freight cars in some of the yard scenes if you  blow them up enough.  
I think your 1920-30 period makes sense.
    Rich Burg


Re: An unusual car - compressed gas

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <barrybennetttoo@...> wrote:

 I also have vague memories that acetylene gas was also used for lighting here in the UK so it may also have some use in US passenger car lighting.

Does anyone know what the actual gas was that passenger cars used, and which may well have been transported by the car in the photo. 

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.

While acetylene lighting equipment was sold for railroad car use in the US, the dominant player was Pintsch gas, made from naphtha. The two systems were not compatible, so roads tended to standardize on one or the other. Here is a link to a Scineticic American article about the production of Pintsch gas:

http://www.catskillarchive.com/rrextra/SDGAS.Html

Dennis Storzek


Re: one of N&W's battleship gons on the New Haven

Bruce Smith
 

Don,

You will note that I very carefully did not say WHERE the N&W coal train was <VBG>. I agree that there is an excellent chance that it really is on the New Haven.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [STMFC@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Don [riverman_vt@yahoo.com]
Sent: Monday, February 10, 2014 7:19 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: one of N&W's battleship gons on the New Haven

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce F. Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

Claus,

Looks to be an N&W coal train. The car in the foreground is an N&W HPb class hopper. I note the ghosted image of a steam loco on the scan... perhaps a double exposure or perhaps a double scan <G>.


BUT.....it could still be on the New Haven as the N&W was the primary mover of coal that supplied a power plant near Providence years ago. The Northrup Ave. Yard would receive what was really an early unit train of N&W cars carrying coal and they would be delivered a few at a time to the power plant. Noted New Haven
modeler Bill Aldrich and I were speaking about this earlier today
after I found a photo of an N&W hopper in the upper Connecticut
River Valley. N&W hoppers were otherwise somewhat rare in New England, particularly Northern New England. while the power plant
in question was on tide water there was not enough dradt near the plant to take the coal by water.

Cordially, Don Valentine



------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Re: An unusual car - compressed gas

Barry Bennett
 

Someone commented earlier about Naptha. IIRC naptha was used in some gas works to enhance the calorific value of the gas produced, or perhaps to create other gas mixtures. I also have vague memories that acetylene gas was also used for lighting here in the UK so it may also have some use in US passenger car lighting.

Does anyone know what the actual gas was that passenger cars used, and which may well have been transported by the car in the photo. 

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.


On Tue, Feb 11, 2014 at 10:43 AM, <paul.doggett2472@...> wrote:
 

It may well be in the UK we had similar cars  for towngas for coach lighting used to charge the passenger coaches with gas for gas lighting

Paul Doggett

UK



Re: An unusual car - compressed gas

paul.doggett2472@...
 

It may well be in the UK we had similar cars  for towngas for coach lighting used to charge the passenger coaches with gas for gas lighting

Paul Doggett

UK


Re: Railroad ties as car loads

CJ Riley
 

One of the RR Cyc reprints includes ARA(?) loading diagrams for that gondola load and I built one myself. It's obviously more stable that way with much of the mass below the sides.
 
CJ Riley
Bainbridge Island WA


From: Nelson Moyer
To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Monday, February 10, 2014 2:43 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Railroad ties as car loads

 
I have a photo of a CB&Q composite gondola filled with ties. The unusual aspect of the photo is that the tie stacks on both ends were lengthwise, while the rest of the tie stacks were crosswise with respect to the rails. That arrangement made an interesting load for a war emergency gondola.

Nelson Moyer

On Feb 10, 2014, at 9:20 AM, "Don" <riverman_vt@...> wrote:

 


--- In STMFC@..., granpa92@... wrote:
>
> Interesting and informative video.
>
> But, tell me one thing, how does a SEABOARD AIR LINE "watermelon" car
> end up in Missouri hauling fresh cut railroad ties?
>
> It looks like the serving RR comandered any and every car from any RR
> they could to haul ties.
>
> Thanks for sharing,
>
> Larry Platt
>
>

If the tiesw came from a supplier located on SAL trackage this should come as no surprise given the the Class V-9 and V-10 SAL
ventilate3d box cars comprised a LARGE percentage of the SAL fleet until the late 1940's. If the photo was taken during WW II, with the
inherent car shortaqe, it comes as even ess of a surprise. Don't
forget that the Wine Ventilators in the V-9's and V-10's incused a lumber loading door. When used with the regular doors the "vents"
were little different than any other doubmle sheathed box car.

Still have Wright Trak V-9 and V-10 ressin vent kits s for sale
for anyone who wants one. Contact me off list for further info.

Cordially, Don Valentine




Re: UP 155000

tjcataldo
 

MICRO TRAINS CARA ARE A STANDARD PROTOTYPE BOX CAR SO THEY PAD PRINT MANY DIFFERENT ROADS
MAYBE SOMEDAY THEY WILL WAKE UP AND DO  REAL PROTOTYPE FREIGHT FOR EACH ROAD


On Mon, Feb 3, 2014 at 8:58 PM, GCRDS <GCRDS@...> wrote:
 

In need for a box car for Auto service on my 1953 era PNW railway (N Scale), I just purchased a Micro-Trains UP 50 foot box. Link at:
 
 
However now that I got it, I look a look at my UP Freight car book to see if I could find any info on it. Well she graces the cover and I can see that she was a one of kind car. Oops, I do not care too much for unique cars. Well I have it, so my question is, even though 155000 was a one of car, it looks to be somewhat close to other UP 50 footers, at least to my untrained (no pun intended) eye. Considering the limited range of accurate steam era freight cars available (especially for auto service), am I at least in the ball park (preferably not out in left field though) with this car?
 
Basically I'm looking for a car that would be delivering autos to a car dealer in a smaller town in Washington State circa 1953. I had intended to try to look through the archives on both UP 155000 and auto deliveries, but I did not get a chance to do so today, so if it is there, I do intend to look, but any info would still be appreciated!
 
TIA!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, UT
 
"My Train of Thought left the station without me!"




--
Thomas  j Cataldo


Re: Railroad ties as car loads

Cyril Durrenberger
 

There are photos of ties being stacked like that on flat cars on the D&IR in the early 1900's.

Cyril Durrenberger



From: Nelson Moyer
To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Monday, February 10, 2014 4:43 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Railroad ties as car loads

 
I have a photo of a CB&Q composite gondola filled with ties. The unusual aspect of the photo is that the tie stacks on both ends were lengthwise, while the rest of the tie stacks were crosswise with respect to the rails. That arrangement made an interesting load for a war emergency gondola.

Nelson Moyer

On Feb 10, 2014, at 9:20 AM, "Don" <riverman_vt@...> wrote:

 


--- In STMFC@..., granpa92@... wrote:
>
> Interesting and informative video.
>
> But, tell me one thing, how does a SEABOARD AIR LINE "watermelon" car
> end up in Missouri hauling fresh cut railroad ties?
>
> It looks like the serving RR comandered any and every car from any RR
> they could to haul ties.
>
> Thanks for sharing,
>
> Larry Platt
>
>

If the tiesw came from a supplier located on SAL trackage this should come as no surprise given the the Class V-9 and V-10 SAL
ventilate3d box cars comprised a LARGE percentage of the SAL fleet until the late 1940's. If the photo was taken during WW II, with the
inherent car shortaqe, it comes as even ess of a surprise. Don't
forget that the Wine Ventilators in the V-9's and V-10's incused a lumber loading door. When used with the regular doors the "vents"
were little different than any other doubmle sheathed box car.

Still have Wright Trak V-9 and V-10 ressin vent kits s for sale
for anyone who wants one. Contact me off list for further info.

Cordially, Don Valentine




Re: Is that a poultry car to our left?

Schuyler Larrabee
 

The ERIE images are also being reversed.

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of wlhoss@...
Sent: Monday, February 10, 2014 2:10 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Is that a poultry car to our left?

 

 

Apparently the objective  was to get as many uploaded as quick as possible.  It's been posted on other lists that they will go back later and clean things up.  A note on the B&O list this morning said this was already happening on the B&O Photos.

 

Bill Hoss

 

In a message dated 2/10/2014 1:02:16 P.M. Central Standard Time, destorzek@... writes:

 

 



---In STMFC@..., wrote:

I'm amazed at how many of the photos people have shared lately from these
collections are reversed. Any suggestions as to why ? Murphy's Law of 50/50?

If these are scans from negatives, it may be an issue of which way the emulsion has to face... not wanting to risk having it stick to the glass. The scanning software may have a setting to automatically reverse the graytones to yield a positive image, but to mirror the image would mean someone actually has to open each in Photoshop, so you get to do that yourself.

Dennis


Re: UP 155000

Brian Termunde
 

This excellent information Eric, and I thank you! It's not exactly what I wanted to hear, but it IS what I needed to know! It's too bad I didn't ask before I bought the car, oh well, I can always strip the letting off and redo it for something a little more correct...in fact, I think that's what I will do. Even if no one else knows, I will, and it would always bother me.
 
Thanks again everyone for sharing all of this information with me, I really appreciate it!

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, UT
 
"My Train of Thought left the station without me!"
 

5a. Re: UP 155000
    Posted by:  elombard@... r_eric_lombard
    Date: Sun Feb 9, 2014 9:05 am ((PST))

Guy and Brian,

Here is a service history for UP 155000 I have assembled from the ORER.


Re: An unusual car - compressed gas

Steve SANDIFER
 

Very similar to 3-tube helium car, but not a helium car. Compressed gas sounds very viable.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
To:
Sent: Monday, February 10, 2014 3:24 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] An unusual car - compressed gas

 

Claus,


It looks very similar to the early 3-tube helium cars.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."


On Feb 10, 2014, at 3:10 PM, Claus Schlund HGM wrote:

Hi List Members,

An unusual car - compressed gas? Photo was taken on the SP. Nothing to provide a date other than the automobiles.

Image is mirror reversed.

Anyone care to share some insights?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12330940283/sizes/o/in/photostream/

 -  Claus Schlund


Re: Barriger Photo Collection

Nathan Obermeyer
 

Tim,


I never did think about the out of country photo sites before.  I have heard just about any picture posted is sucked up to a website overseas.  Wish I could read Russian.  Do you know if there is an English translation version of that website you posted?  Thanks,


Nate



Re: Barriger Photo Collection

cinderandeight@...
 

Al,
    The PRR Toledo Division collection shows many construction photos including the Detroit freight station under construction and a pristine shot of a brand new Pennfort Jct. tower.  That line opened in 1922.  Lots of interesting freight cars in some of the yard scenes if you blow them up enough.  I think your 1920-30 period makes sense.
    Rich Burg


Re: Heavy duty MILW flat with load

Tim O'Connor
 


that is just spectacular! I like the mill markings on the tank too; I don't
think I've seen that before on that type of load.


Here's an interesting load from the Frost Vancouver collection. Seems we were talking about these cars not too long ago. (Sorry if this photo was referenced then, but this is such an interesting collection to browse. Thanks to Bill for the great portfolio boxcar photos from this collection.)

http://searcharchives.vancouver.ca/milwaukee-road-rly-flat-car-loaded-with-tank;rad


Tom Madden


Re: Barriger Photo Collection

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

 
Tony, any digital image posted anywhere that can be found with web browsers or searches exists in a thousand different copies almost instantly . . .

      Tim, read what I said. I agree with Brian (and you) on the practical side. BUT I don't think any of us should confuse that with the legal side. Sure, probably most kinds of re-use would never be caught, and if caught, might not result in much of a problem. But do you really wanna find out? I sure don't want anyone reading this list to think that re-use is unhindered and unrestricted. Of course readers can make their own decisions about what they want to do, just be aware of the rules.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Barriger Photo Collection

Tim O'Connor
 

You may be right in a practical sense, Brian, but legally you are far out to sea. "Downloadable" did not and does not mean "public domain." Rights have to be granted. I don't recommend anyone challenging these rules.
Tony Thompson


Tony, any digital image posted anywhere that can be found with web browsers
or searches exists in a thousand different copies almost instantly. These silly
Flickr features that fool people into thinking their pictures are copy protected
are simply taking advantage of their customer's ignorance. Kids were fooled into
thinking that "Snapchat" actually prevented pictures from being downloaded! If
you can see it on your screen, it has ALREADY BEEN COPIED -- the COPY exists on
your computer or other device. All anyone needs to know is how to grab the copy
and post it somewhere else. Yes, you can get a wrist slap or have your post taken
down from a web site, if the original owner complains, and can prove ownership.
But so what? There are literally thousands of photo sharing websites, most of
them easily accessible from anywhere on the planet, but NOT accessible to US
copyright laws. Some of the best US railroad photos can be found on Russian web
sites, for example http://photo.qip.ru/users/calif2000/3851637/90738601/#mainImageLink

It is what it is... Myself, I share my own pictures from my Dad's camera and mine
freely. People still collect good slides and negatives, and pay good money for them
on Ebay. I buy them too. Not to share, but because I want really hi-res versions for
myself. But more often than not, there are lo-res versions already out there of these
same slides, that can be easily found with a Google Image search.

Tim O'Connor


Re: one of N&W's battleship gons on the New Haven

Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Bruce F. Smith" <smithbf@...> wrote:

Claus,

Looks to be an N&W coal train. The car in the foreground is an N&W HPb class hopper. I note the ghosted image of a steam loco on the scan... perhaps a double exposure or perhaps a double scan <G>.


BUT.....it could still be on the New Haven as the N&W was the primary mover of coal that supplied a power plant near Providence years ago. The Northrup Ave. Yard would receive what was really an early unit train of N&W cars carrying coal and they would be delivered a few at a time to the power plant. Noted New Haven
modeler Bill Aldrich and I were speaking about this earlier today
after I found a photo of an N&W hopper in the upper Connecticut
River Valley. N&W hoppers were otherwise somewhat rare in New England, particularly Northern New England. while the power plant
in question was on tide water there was not enough dradt near the plant to take the coal by water.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Railroad ties as car loads

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

I have a photo of a CB&Q composite gondola filled with ties. The unusual aspect of the photo is that the tie stacks on both ends were lengthwise, while the rest of the tie stacks were crosswise with respect to the rails. That arrangement made an interesting load for a war emergency gondola.

Nelson Moyer


On Feb 10, 2014, at 9:20 AM, "Don" <riverman_vt@...> wrote:

 



--- In STMFC@..., granpa92@... wrote:
>
> Interesting and informative video.
>
> But, tell me one thing, how does a SEABOARD AIR LINE "watermelon" car
> end up in Missouri hauling fresh cut railroad ties?
>
> It looks like the serving RR comandered any and every car from any RR
> they could to haul ties.
>
> Thanks for sharing,
>
> Larry Platt
>
>

If the tiesw came from a supplier located on SAL trackage this should come as no surprise given the the Class V-9 and V-10 SAL
ventilate3d box cars comprised a LARGE percentage of the SAL fleet until the late 1940's. If the photo was taken during WW II, with the
inherent car shortaqe, it comes as even ess of a surprise. Don't
forget that the Wine Ventilators in the V-9's and V-10's incused a lumber loading door. When used with the regular doors the "vents"
were little different than any other doubmle sheathed box car.

Still have Wright Trak V-9 and V-10 ressin vent kits s for sale
for anyone who wants one. Contact me off list for further info.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Barriger Photo Collection

Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

At 12:06 PM 2/10/2014, Steve Sandifer wrote:
They are copyrighted. You aren't supposed to be
able to lift them for your own purposes.
1) From their Flickr profile: http://www.flickr.com/people/barrigerlibrary/

"Higher quality images can be obtained from the
St. Louis Mercantile Library. For information
regarding publication use of the images, please contact the library."



2) ..and the Library web site:
http://www.umsl.edu/mercantile/research/policies/copyright.html

Copyrighted electronic materials in this
collection may be used for research, instruction,
and private study under the provisions of Fair Use.

Fair Use is a provision of United States
Copyright Law http://www.copyright.gov/fls/fl102.html
which allows limited use of copyrighted materials
under certain conditions. Factors to be
considered whether a particular use falls under Fair Use include:
The purpose or character of the use;
The amount and substantiality of the work being used;
The effect of the use on the market for and value of the original.

Under Fair Use you may view, print, photocopy,
and download images from this site without prior
permission, provided that you give proper credit
to the St. Louis Mercantile Library at the
University of Missouri St. Louis on all copies.
We would appreciate the following credit:

© 2005 St. Louis Mercantile Library at the University of Missouri St. Louis

For any other use of these electronic materials,
including but not limited to display, publication and commercial use,
e-mail Charles Brown, Assistant Director.


Opinion: Having put the images very publicly on Flickr...
I suspect the Barriger Library's primary concern is uncredited commercial use.


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

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