Date   

Re: Military loads on the TP&W during WW2

Ray Breyer
 

There are actually five photos of the train in this sequence (pulled by double-headed 80's), and the train is postwar; R. J. Coulter appears in several of the TP&W shots, so they're post-1947. Most likely, this a Guard training movement.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


From: "borhsarchives@..."
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, February 13, 2014 11:04 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Military loads on the TP&W during WW2


Military loads on the TP&W during WW2

NicholasF
 


Re: An unusual car - compressed gas

NicholasF
 

I've just flipped and cropped this photo if that can help anyone with the identification.

Take Care
-Nick Fry


Re: Need TAG boxcar info

Donald Ford <ford.donald77@...>
 

Jim
These 30 cars came from the DT&I the two (2) photos I have one shows the A end clearly does not have a end door #7020 the other photo is side view and does not have the heavy corner of a end door
Don Ford C
ameron MO


On Thursday, February 13, 2014 6:57 PM, Eric Neubauer wrote:
 
USRE lot 430 1964 at Blue Island, TAG 7000-7029, built 10,12-37. There is a rebuilder's photo of available in "Evans Products Builders Photos" if you can't come up with one elsewhere. Side view, black & white. Roof is darker than side and eaves.
 
Eric N.
Jim,

As I understand it, the TAG cars were in fact former DT&I cars which were nearly identical to the PRR X32, but were not PRR cars.  This is confirmed by RP CYC 23, which has a photo of TAG 7004.  As best I can tell, none of the DT&I (and therefore the TAG) cars had end doors like the PRR X33.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
 
Jim, These were covered in Model railroading or Railroad Modeler back in the early 90's I think.  I think I have some info on them but I will have to find it.
Fenton


On Thu, Feb 13, 2014 at 1:45 PM, SMMW <jimking3@...> wrote:
 
TAG ran a small group of ex-PRR 50 foot, double door, round roof boxcars painted in their classic bright blue with black roof and yellow lettering.  Were any of these equipped with end doors (PRR had 300 of those) on the “A” end or were they all solid ends?
 
Jim King
Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.
 
South-Atlantic Region representative for BJB Products
RTV Silicone moldmaking and urethane casting materials.
 



--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...





Re: Need TAG boxcar info

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

USRE lot 430 1964 at Blue Island, TAG 7000-7029, built 10,12-37. There is a rebuilder's photo of available in "Evans Products Builders Photos" if you can't come up with one elsewhere. Side view, black & white. Roof is darker than side and eaves.
 
Eric N.

Jim,

As I understand it, the TAG cars were in fact former DT&I cars which were nearly identical to the PRR X32, but were not PRR cars.  This is confirmed by RP CYC 23, which has a photo of TAG 7004.  As best I can tell, none of the DT&I (and therefore the TAG) cars had end doors like the PRR X33.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

 
Jim, These were covered in Model railroading or Railroad Modeler back in the early 90's I think.  I think I have some info on them but I will have to find it.
Fenton


On Thu, Feb 13, 2014 at 1:45 PM, SMMW <jimking3@...> wrote:
 

TAG ran a small group of ex-PRR 50 foot, double door, round roof boxcars painted in their classic bright blue with black roof and yellow lettering.  Were any of these equipped with end doors (PRR had 300 of those) on the “A” end or were they all solid ends?

 

Jim King

Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

Cell (828) 777-5619

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 

South-Atlantic Region representative for BJB Products

RTV Silicone moldmaking and urethane casting materials.

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com/Urethane_Casting_Materials.html

 




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...



Re: Need TAG boxcar info

Norm Buckhart
 

well I don’t know - can’t get into my backup for the web catalog  I think somewhere around $15 - so let’s figure on that


On Feb 13, 2014, at 2:50 PM, Bruce F. Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:


Jim,

As I understand it, the TAG cars were in fact former DT&I cars which were nearly identical to the PRR X32, but were not PRR cars.  This is confirmed by RP CYC 23, which has a photo of TAG 7004.  As best I can tell, none of the DT&I (and therefore the TAG) cars had end doors like the PRR X33.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...] on behalf of O Fenton Wells [srrfan1401@...]
Sent: Thursday, February 13, 2014 4:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Need TAG boxcar info



Jim, These were covered in Model railroading or Railroad Modeler back in the early 90's I think.  I think I have some info on them but I will have to find it.
Fenton


On Thu, Feb 13, 2014 at 1:45 PM, SMMW <jimking3@...> wrote:
 

TAG ran a small group of ex-PRR 50 foot, double door, round roof boxcars painted in their classic bright blue with black roof and yellow lettering.  Were any of these equipped with end doors (PRR had 300 of those) on the “A” end or were they all solid ends?

 

Jim King

Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

Cell (828) 777-5619

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 

South-Atlantic Region representative for BJB Products

RTV Silicone moldmaking and urethane casting materials.

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com/Urethane_Casting_Materials.html

 





-- 
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...





Re: Need TAG boxcar info

Bruce Smith
 

Jim,

As I understand it, the TAG cars were in fact former DT&I cars which were nearly identical to the PRR X32, but were not PRR cars.  This is confirmed by RP CYC 23, which has a photo of TAG 7004.  As best I can tell, none of the DT&I (and therefore the TAG) cars had end doors like the PRR X33.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...] on behalf of O Fenton Wells [srrfan1401@...]
Sent: Thursday, February 13, 2014 4:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Need TAG boxcar info



Jim, These were covered in Model railroading or Railroad Modeler back in the early 90's I think.  I think I have some info on them but I will have to find it.
Fenton


On Thu, Feb 13, 2014 at 1:45 PM, SMMW <jimking3@...> wrote:
 

TAG ran a small group of ex-PRR 50 foot, double door, round roof boxcars painted in their classic bright blue with black roof and yellow lettering.  Were any of these equipped with end doors (PRR had 300 of those) on the “A” end or were they all solid ends?

 

Jim King

Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

Cell (828) 777-5619

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 

South-Atlantic Region representative for BJB Products

RTV Silicone moldmaking and urethane casting materials.

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com/Urethane_Casting_Materials.html

 




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...



Re: Need TAG boxcar info

O Fenton Wells
 

Jim, These were covered in Model railroading or Railroad Modeler back in the early 90's I think.  I think I have some info on them but I will have to find it.
Fenton


On Thu, Feb 13, 2014 at 1:45 PM, SMMW <jimking3@...> wrote:
 

TAG ran a small group of ex-PRR 50 foot, double door, round roof boxcars painted in their classic bright blue with black roof and yellow lettering.  Were any of these equipped with end doors (PRR had 300 of those) on the “A” end or were they all solid ends?

 

Jim King

Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

Cell (828) 777-5619

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 

South-Atlantic Region representative for BJB Products

RTV Silicone moldmaking and urethane casting materials.

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com/Urethane_Casting_Materials.html

 




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: Cocoa Beach Photos Posted

Benjamin Hom
 


From: "dhussey@..."
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2014 11:45 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Cocoa Beach Photos Posted
 
I have uploaded my Cocoa Beach 2014 Photos at:
Dave Hussey


Need TAG boxcar info

Jim King
 

TAG ran a small group of ex-PRR 50 foot, double door, round roof boxcars painted in their classic bright blue with black roof and yellow lettering.  Were any of these equipped with end doors (PRR had 300 of those) on the “A” end or were they all solid ends?

 

Jim King

Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.

Cell (828) 777-5619

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com

 

South-Atlantic Region representative for BJB Products

RTV Silicone moldmaking and urethane casting materials.

www.smokymountainmodelworks.com/Urethane_Casting_Materials.html

 


Re: An unusual car - compressed gas

Malcolm H. Houck
 

Someone commented earlier about Naptha. IIRC naptha was used in some gas
works to enhance the calorific value of the gas produced, or perhaps to
create other gas mixtures. I also have vague memories that acetylene gas
was also used for lighting here in the UK so it may also have some use in
US passenger car lighting.

Does anyone know what the actual gas was that passenger cars used, and
which may well have been transported by the car in the photo.

Barry Bennett
Coventry, England.
 
Naptha was the fuel used in the Pintsch Gas lighting
systems. That required a substantial infrastructure of
charging stations (not using freight cars for transport of
the gas generally - mandatory freight car content)
 and was therefore a reason that Pintsch gas usage
 did not gain a wide acceptance, The term Pintsch
gas has evolved to virtually a generic term when making
reference to methods of lighting with hydrocarbon fuel.
 
Acetylene was used for lighting in many applications
provided either from generators (tanks charged with
calcium carbide and water) at about 5 psi, or from
compressed gas cylinders. Locomotive headlamps
(pre-electrification) were acetylene fueled, as were
headlamps on  early pioneering automobiles and
motorcycles. 
 
Frost gas was also a popular usage to the end of
the 19th century. The fuel for Frost gas was gasoline
vapors from under car cylinders packed with cotton
waste and soaked with gasoline. It was popular to a
degree since a single charge would provide fuel
some period in excess of 100 hours; -- well exceeding
the duration of other hydrocarbon fuel usages.
 
Mal Houck


Re: Before Cardboard Appliance Containers

drgwrail
 

--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 2/12/14, rwitt_2000@... <rwitt_2000@...> wrote:

Subject: [STMFC] RE: Before Cardboard Appliance Containers
To: STMFC@...
Date: Wednesday, February 12, 2014, 8:27 PM



As I recall during the late 1930's appliances such a refrigerators were shipped in completely enclosed woodcrates. These were made with a heavy bottom and top and side panels maade fron very rough 1/8 " plysood framed is 1x2 wood with a hrizontal stiffene of the same size at the center.

The panels came off as complete pieces, each framed individually.

The empty crates were eagerly sought from apppiance stores and were used by homeowners for panelling in garages, basement crilings,, plus as playhouses by kids.

Chuck Yungkurth













 









Bob,

Yes, the B&O box car is a class M-26D, the lettering for
the class is visible through the windshield, in its as-built
appearance. Some orders of M-26D were delivered with
Youngstown doors. Notice the chalk marks on the sides. An
interesting photo.

I seem to recall that appliances and similarly sized objects
were shipped in "crates" into the 1960s. Some
items still are shipped in crates.

Bob Witt


Re: Moisture Trap for Air Brush

Tom in Texas
 

I built one of the copper tube after coolers from the article you mentioned and it worked fine. I traded the unit to a friend years ago so I don't remember all of the specifics

Tom in Texas


Re: Moisture Trap for Air Brush

riverman_vt@...
 

I remembre that piece as well, Jim, but certainly not the issue. You might give Carstens

Publications a call to see if they can help track it down.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Before Cardboard Appliance Containers

caboose9792@aol.com <caboose9792@...>
 

Reasom being in part to the taifs being lower for applinces loaded in crates vs paper products given to the loads. The higher risk of damage being the driver. I have study in my files about how to determane the way to get the best price to the destanation and applinces being the example.

mark rickert
Sent with Verizon Mobile Email

---Original Message---
From: STMFC@...
Sent: 2/12/2014 9:27 pm
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] RE: Before Cardboard Appliance Containers

Bob,Yes, the B&O box car is a class M-26D, the lettering for the class is visible through the windshield, in its as-built appearance. Some orders of M-26D were delivered with Youngstown doors. Notice the chalk marks on the sides. An interesting photo.I seem to recall that appliances and similarly sized objects were shipped in "crates" into the 1960s. Some items still are shipped in crates.Bob Witt


Re: Before Cardboard Appliance Containers

rwitt_2000
 

Bob,

Yes, the B&O box car is a class M-26D, the lettering for the class is visible through the windshield, in its as-built appearance. Some orders of M-26D were delivered with Youngstown doors. Notice the chalk marks on the sides. An interesting photo.

I seem to recall that appliances and similarly sized objects were shipped in "crates" into the 1960s. Some items still are shipped in crates.

Bob Witt


Tank Car Running Boards and Platforms

Guy Wilber
 

Mike wrote:
 
"Note that Kaminski states on pg 241 that "By the late 1940's, the early wood
running boards and side platforms were being replaced in new car
construction with steel grid types."
 
All newly built tank cars were required to have metal running boards applied and platforms, if applied, as of January 1, 1948.  The ICC granted exceptions to that ruling for tank cars carrying any commodity which may have had corrosive effects on metal, thus wood platforms were permissible for certain applications of platforms, but not running boards.
 
Metal running boards and platforms were subject to approval by the AAR as:  Group 1) for use as metal running boards for box and other roofed cars (including type "LO" covered hopper cars), and for metal brake steps for all cars, also for dome steps and platforms on tank cars when the length of unsupported span does not exceed 4' 0"; Group 2) For use as metal running boards for box and other roofed cars (including type "LO" covered hopper cars), and for dome steps and dome platforms on tank cars when the length of unsupported span is over 4' 0", but not more than 7' 0"; Group 3) For use as metal running boards for tank cars when the length of unsupported span is over 7' 0", but less than 10' 0".
 
Specifications:  2) The running boards, brake steps, and foot boards shall be of material and structure which will provide  the same or a greater degree of strength and safety as that of wood.  3) Running boards, foot boards, and brake steps shall have uniform anti-skid tread surfaces and be of a construction to provide at least 50 per cent clear opening that will permit elimination of accumulation of snow and ice.  Openings in tread surfaces shall not exceed 1-1/2" in at least one direction and not more than 6" in the other direction.
 
A static test load of 200 pounds applied at the center of the span across the full width of the section shall not create a deflection of greater than 1/8" for 4' section, 1/4" for 7' section and 1/4" for 10' section. 
 
The thickness of running boards suitable for and applied to tank cars ranged from 1-1/2" to 2-1/4" in order to meet the requirements of the AAR's static test. 
 
Tank cars built prior to January 1, 1948 were not required to have wood running boards and/or platforms replaced unless they were rebuilt under the provisions of AAR Interchange Rule 112.  If  a new tank was applied to an existing underframe, or a new underframe was placed under an existing tank the car was required to be fitted with metal running boards and metal platform applied. 
 
Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Moisture Trap for Air Brush

np328
 

      Wasn't there an article in (IIRC), RMC quite some time, perhaps several decades ago about a build your own moisture trap? As I recall, if I recall correctly, it was made of quarter inch copper tubing formed by wrapping around a coffee can. Connection fitting soldered on the upper end part, with the tubing in a  spiraling descent around and came to a T copper fitting on the bottom end, set up and down. There was a hole (#78?) drilled onto the cap that fit on the bottom of the T, and another fitting on the top of the T that was the other connection. Moisture that did condense ran via gravity to collect in the bottom cap of the T where it was expelled through the hole.

     Using my spotty math, wrapping a length of copper tubing around a circle six inches in diameter is 18 inches of run, eight inches in diameter is a two foot run, sixteen times around a six inch diameter container or twelve times around the eight inch diameter container and you have twenty four feet of run in a rather compact space. Given how copper would absorb and then release any heat caused by the compressor, I would believe this should condense any moisture.  That is how I recall the article. Cannot recall which was the input and which to the sprayer however I thought off the T was to the air brush.  The simplicity of it was appealing.   

   Was this in RMC in say the late 1970s or 80's?    For what it's worth.            Jim Dick - St. Paul

     


Re: Moisture trap for air brush

Douglas Harding
 

Gene one solution would be to run an hose from the compressor to your paint booth, mount the moisture trap and regulator on the outside of the paint booth, attach your airbrush to the regulator or trap with the standard hose it came with, and begin painting. This will keep your compressor outside, away from your painting area, reducing noise, and gives you a long line to cool the air. It also gives you the 6’ (or so) of hose for free movement of the airbrush without the cumbersome moisture trap hanging off the bottom of the airbrush.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: Moisture trap for air brush

O Fenton Wells
 

Gentlemen, I don't want to pick an argument but I would disagree.  Most of the moisture we get in our applications is from the moisture that is compressed with the air.  I don't think given the short distances between our compressors and our air brush the delta T is going to be an issue.  Blow by from the compressor cycle especially given that moistures condenses in the tank is usually the source of moisture in our applications.  If you get a fairly large moisture trap, or pneumatic filter as used in our applications it probably doesn't make much difference where you put it as long as it is in front of, that is before the air brush.  Unless you have a large industrial system the moisture and temperature is not the cause of moisture in most cases.  I put my filter right after the regulator that came with my compressor.  It is slightly oversized for my application but it has never failed me, that is no water has gone to the air brush.  I have used this set up in Florida, Ohio, Illinois, New Hampshire and now North Carolina.
Fenton Wells


On Wed, Feb 12, 2014 at 5:55 PM, <bierglaeser@...> wrote:
 

When you say "as far down the airline as you can" I assume you mean as far away from the compressor as possible.  That make sense because the air would be ever cooler as it progressed away from the compressor.  The instructions with the trap show it connected to the bottom of the airbrush where the hose normally connects.  That isn't convenient in my case  but possible, of course.


My question, however, was really how far above sea level should it be placed.  What I really mean is, must the moisture trap be below the airbrush?

I am probably unnecessarily concerned about this issue because the humidity is always relatively low here.  We have experienced a sweltering 50% but 20% inside my heated/air-conditioned building is consistent.

Thanks to all who responded.  Based on what has been said, some components will be rearranged.

Gene Green


---In STMFC@...,
Install the trap as far down the airline as you can find a place to fit it. 

Industrial compressors often have after coolers which are intended to lower the temperature of the compressed air;  long pipe runs have a similar effect. Since any moisture in the air compressed will condense as the temperature drops, the trap should be fitted at the outlett of the after cooler or better still at the far end of the fixed line so that any condensation in the lines will also be removed.

If you have a fixed compressor then installing few feet of metal piping between the pump and the moisture trap and making your airbrush hose connection close to the trap would be very a good thing, especially in humid climates. While good units are not cheap,  automatic drain traps are also worth considering if you are running the compressor extensively, especially in damp climates, and these should be fitted at a low point in the piping as this is where the water tends to collect; unless you want a wet patch on the floor in the workshop, don't forget to install a tundish and drain to the outside as the trap will discharge slugs of water at intervals. 

For the person using a small hobby compressor in an apartment with the airbrush attached directly to the compressor, a system like this is probably overkill, but if you are doing a lot of painting and have a tank mounted compressor in a permanent place in a garage or workshop, then a few feet of iron piping and a drain trap might be a good investment

Aidrian 








in the line as you can 
On 9/02/2014, at 3:22 PM, <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

 

Some time back Bill Welch, if memory serves, initiated a discussion that eventually included the pros and cons of including a moisture trap in one's air brush setup.  Although the humidity in my layout building here has been a very consistent 20% and there was never any problem using an air brush sans moisture trap in El Paso, I decided a moisture trap was a good idea.  It arrived today.



As I recall (I can't find the original thread) someone suggested that a moisture trap is best positioned as low as possible.  The obvious and most convenient position for my moisture trap is immediately below my pressure regulator which is positioned outside my spray booth at about the same level as the air brush when it is in use.

Should the "plumbing" be rearranged to locate the moisture trap lower?
Should the moisture trap before the pressure regulator?

Gene Green





--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...

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