Date   

Re: Sunshine resale values..

Brian Carlson
 

I should also mention. I'll be doing a resin building clinic for some of our interested club members too, so I hope to convert some. I only wish there were resin kits for some modern cars as some of the guys prefer modern stuff that existed after this list. 
Brian Carlson. 



.


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Brian Carlson
 

Let's not go into the hobby is dying discussion again please? Next up will be the IC banana topic or freight car distribution. 
The mean age in my club is actually dropping for the first time in Ages with three new members, two twenty something's and one in his thirty's. I'm not the young guy anymore (40) but hope to have 40 years left in me. Local hobby shops are a dying breed but that has more to do with consumer habits than hobbyists. 
Brian Carlson. 


On Mar 4, 2014, at 4:35 PM, "Armen Premo" <armprem2@...> wrote:

 

    Just picked up a 1976 copy of MR at a train show.I came home and compared it to the current issue.The size and scope plus the current number of remaining hobby shops tends to indicate that the patient is on life support.Most of the attendees at the show all seemed to be ready for nursing homes or assisted living facilities.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..

 

Matt

I had lunch with a friend a couple of weeks ago and we had a good
discussion on his current project building old Walthers wood freight
car kits. Modeling is about doing what you like doing. And yeah I
still build old Athearn kits -- I build them better than Athearn does!

Tim O'

>On a tangent (albeit related), I stopped over to Dads last night and found him assembling 50 year old Globe and Athearn models. Kits never go bad...
>
>(And they actually look decent in spite of their ancient manufacturing processes.)
>
>Matt Goodman
>Columbus, Ohio
>
>Sent from my mobile
>
>On Mar 3, 2014, at 5:02 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
>
>Clark
>
>People have been predicting the death of model railroading for 50 years...
>I think the current generation raised on RTR may decide, as many of us do
>as we get older, to try something more interesting and challenging -- like
>building prototypical models! That's what makes us modelers, and not just
>collectors.
>
>Tim O'
>
>
>> I've thought about what those with stock piles of kits they'll never build are going to do with them? In my opinion, now would be the best time for them to recoup their money. In another 5-10 years I'm afraid the kits will be next to worthless.
>> Clark Propst
>> Mason City Iowa


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Pierre Oliver <pierre.oliver@...>
 

While that assessment is supported by a quick glance at one or two shows, I suspect that the reality is a little different.
This hobby today is nothing like the hobby was in the mid 70s when I worked in a hobby shop. And I suspect that in 5-10 years it will have evolved again. Fewer younger people go out to the shows. Fewer people are buying magazines, but I have no trouble selling my services and products.
I submit that the "younger" people who are practicing this dark art of model railroading are just doing it differently.
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 3/4/2014 4:35 PM, Armen Premo wrote:

 

    Just picked up a 1976 copy of MR at a train show.I came home and compared it to the current issue.The size and scope plus the current number of remaining hobby shops tends to indicate that the patient is on life support.Most of the attendees at the show all seemed to be ready for nursing homes or assisted living facilities.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..

 

Matt

I had lunch with a friend a couple of weeks ago and we had a good
discussion on his current project building old Walthers wood freight
car kits. Modeling is about doing what you like doing. And yeah I
still build old Athearn kits -- I build them better than Athearn does!

Tim O'

>On a tangent (albeit related), I stopped over to Dads last night and found him assembling 50 year old Globe and Athearn models. Kits never go bad...
>
>(And they actually look decent in spite of their ancient manufacturing processes.)
>
>Matt Goodman
>Columbus, Ohio
>
>Sent from my mobile
>
>On Mar 3, 2014, at 5:02 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
>
>Clark
>
>People have been predicting the death of model railroading for 50 years...
>I think the current generation raised on RTR may decide, as many of us do
>as we get older, to try something more interesting and challenging -- like
>building prototypical models! That's what makes us modelers, and not just
>collectors.
>
>Tim O'
>
>
>> I've thought about what those with stock piles of kits they'll never build are going to do with them? In my opinion, now would be the best time for them to recoup their money. In another 5-10 years I'm afraid the kits will be next to worthless.
>> Clark Propst
>> Mason City Iowa

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Re: Sunshine resale values..

Armand Premo
 

    Just picked up a 1976 copy of MR at a train show.I came home and compared it to the current issue.The size and scope plus the current number of remaining hobby shops tends to indicate that the patient is on life support.Most of the attendees at the show all seemed to be ready for nursing homes or assisted living facilities.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..

 

Matt

I had lunch with a friend a couple of weeks ago and we had a good
discussion on his current project building old Walthers wood freight
car kits. Modeling is about doing what you like doing. And yeah I
still build old Athearn kits -- I build them better than Athearn does!

Tim O'

>On a tangent (albeit related), I stopped over to Dads last night and found him assembling 50 year old Globe and Athearn models. Kits never go bad...
>
>(And they actually look decent in spite of their ancient manufacturing processes.)
>
>Matt Goodman
>Columbus, Ohio
>
>Sent from my mobile
>
>On Mar 3, 2014, at 5:02 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
>
>Clark
>
>People have been predicting the death of model railroading for 50 years...
>I think the current generation raised on RTR may decide, as many of us do
>as we get older, to try something more interesting and challenging -- like
>building prototypical models! That's what makes us modelers, and not just
>collectors.
>
>Tim O'
>
>
>> I've thought about what those with stock piles of kits they'll never build are going to do with them? In my opinion, now would be the best time for them to recoup their money. In another 5-10 years I'm afraid the kits will be next to worthless.
>> Clark Propst
>> Mason City Iowa


Re: Sunshine resale values..

asychis@...
 

But Allen,
 
If you are dead and buried, why would a loss of interest in transition era modeling be of any concern at all?  This is a curious thread.  We have a lot of kits out there, and others still being produced by Westerfield et al., yet we bemoan the "end of kit building."  I guess we must have too much of a really good thing, and can't accept the fact that life is good right now, and for years to come for transition-era resin kit builders.  I cannot for the life of me think of another craft-type hobby where people complain that they can have too much available.  I ain't never had too much fun!
 
Jerry Michels


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Clark Propst
 

Well, it’s not that I want/need any Sunshine kits. If it’s anything, it’s a ‘haves verse have nots’ thing.
The ‘have nots’ would be a friend that’s a FtDDM&S modeler and would dearly love one of those little MoP rebuilt box cars the FtDDM&S picked up used. He’s the kind of guy that’d probably pay well above list for one too. He’s too busy with his layout to build resin kits, so if he ever found one I’d end up building it... A win, win for both of us. He’d get his representative freight car and I’d have the frustration...I mean...pleasure of building it. It’s all about the play value for your money.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Tim O'Connor
 

Matt

I had lunch with a friend a couple of weeks ago and we had a good
discussion on his current project building old Walthers wood freight
car kits. Modeling is about doing what you like doing. And yeah I
still build old Athearn kits -- I build them better than Athearn does!

Tim O'

On a tangent (albeit related), I stopped over to Dads last night and found him assembling 50 year old Globe and Athearn models. Kits never go bad...

(And they actually look decent in spite of their ancient manufacturing processes.)

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Mar 3, 2014, at 5:02 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:

Clark

People have been predicting the death of model railroading for 50 years...
I think the current generation raised on RTR may decide, as many of us do
as we get older, to try something more interesting and challenging -- like
building prototypical models! That's what makes us modelers, and not just
collectors.

Tim O'


I've thought about what those with stock piles of kits they'll never build are going to do with them? In my opinion, now would be the best time for them to recoup their money. In another 5-10 years I'm afraid the kits will be next to worthless.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Working with dry transfer decals.

michaelegross <michaelEGross@...>
 

Very thorough and helpful description of their application, Doug.  I have used Clover House dry transfers for years, particularly their chalk marks, and find them wonderful.

Michael Gross
La Cañada, CA


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Dave Nelson
 

I agree with Clark that the hobby is not going away (nor is the resin market going to go away) but “The Hobby” is changing.  I look at those (very nicely done) meat reefers that were introduced recently and wonder, at $40/car, how many are being sold to new entrants to HO scale?  HO used to be rather inexpensive but that’s all changed and it seems that only the more mature people – those at their prime income earning years or those who have accumulated a roster over decades – are actually in the market to buy anything.  Long term, IMO, the demographics just don’t look that promising.

 

OTOH, outside of HO Scale (And O, N, etc., etc.) I’m finding considerable satisfaction in V-Scale (V for virtual) in rail simulators.  The cost differential relative to physical model railroading is staggeringly better and should anyone take the time to learn 3d CAD you can make any freight car for which you’ve got dimensional data and images. And once in CAD making copies takes a second at zero cost… and zero cost is what a lot of these models go for when posted to exchange forums.  Hard to beat. I see a lot of teens and 20 years olds in the various SIM forums and AFAIK most of the older guys are there because they cannot afford physical model railroading – either cost is too high or space too small.

 

It’s obviously not the same as physical model railroading but consider when N scale was introduced it was obviously not the  same as HO but it claimed its own fans and established its own niche and therefore its arrival and success did have an effect upon the HO market.

 

My point is the market for HO scale goods has shifted over the past 20-30 years and IMO will continue to shift to ever smaller runs at ever higher prices.  IMO Resin kits will still have a viable place there because they can easily address the niche models.  But for those who get priced out by the trend but still want to do model railroading there will be an alternative in Simulators that fits the cost / space bill and to whatever degree others who do/did buy goods (like myself) move that way it will have a bearing on what happens to pricing in the physical model markets.

 

FWIW, I still occasionally buy resin and I still enjoy building them but I’ll never bother with a layout.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of cepropst@q.com
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 6:46 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..



The hobby’s not going away, nor is the resin market

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Kadee order to make WP car with Chrysler trucks

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 


Looks like it (and the brake platform) might be Morton. Shadows suggest perforations and end of running board seems to have a C shape ruling out Apex and Blaw-Knox.
 
Eric N.
 

Can someone with better eyes and knowledge tell me which running board is on this car? The brake wheel appears to be Ajax.

Thanks,
Ross


Re: Kadee order to make WP car with Chrysler trucks

Ed Hawkins
 

On Mar 4, 2014, at 11:39 AM, <twinstarcars@yahoo.com> wrote:

Can someone with better eyes and knowledge tell me which running board is on this car? The brake wheel appears to be Ajax.
Ross,
The 600 WP 40' PS-1s built in lot 8027 (20801-21400) all came with Ajax hand brakes and Morton running boards & brake steps.

Regarding the trucks, I'm late in replying to the discussion. Photos I have of the original 20 aluminum-painted cars 20801-20820 that were renumbered 19501-19520 ca. 1/54 show at least a partial mixture of A-3 Ride Control and Chrysler trucks.

Photos of 20803 and 20807 (Pullman builder photo) before the renumbering have Chrysler trucks as do renumbered cars 19507 and 19510. A photo of 19512 has A-3 Ride Control trucks as were found on all the regular freight cars in series 20821-21400.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Working with dry transfer decals.

Rod Miller
 

On 3/4/14, 9:06 AM, Norman+Laraine Larkin wrote:
As an aside, dry transfers work well as paint masks. Paint the surface your
color of choice, apply the transfer (usually lettering), paint the exposed
surface a second color, and once the last coat is dry, apply a piece of
masking tape to the transfer, and carefully peel the tape off with the mask.
The result is a clean and sharp image in your preferred color. Worked really
well with Floquil.
Norm Larkin
Great tip.

Here's something I learned when applying an NP monad herald.
The monad is 3 colors, white, black, and red so you have to
put the 2nd and 3rd colors down on top of others. Burnish
only where the new color will go, and if you have to burnish
over an existing color, try to stay on the new color. Otherwise
the existing color can get attached to the dry transfer
backing and will be lifted when you pick up the backing.

Rod
--

Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale West / S West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2015 Meet is Feb 5 - 7
http://www.rodmiller.com | http://www.oscalewest.com


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Matt Goodman
 

On a tangent (albeit related), I stopped over to Dads last night and found him assembling 50 year old Globe and Athearn models. Kits never go bad...

(And they actually look decent in spite of their ancient manufacturing processes.)

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Mar 3, 2014, at 5:02 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:

Clark

People have been predicting the death of model railroading for 50 years...
I think the current generation raised on RTR may decide, as many of us do
as we get older, to try something more interesting and challenging -- like
building prototypical models! That's what makes us modelers, and not just
collectors.

Tim O'


I've thought about what those with stock piles of kits they'll never build are going to do with them? In my opinion, now would be the best time for them to recoup their money. In another 5-10 years I'm afraid the kits will be next to worthless.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


Re: Kadee order to make WP car with Chrysler trucks

twinstarcars
 

Can someone with better eyes and knowledge tell me which running board is on this car? The brake wheel appears to be Ajax.
Thanks,
Ross


Re: Working with dry transfer decals.

Tim O'Connor
 

Doug

I agree with all of this, except that I'd also agree with another post,
that a small piece of 3M magic tape will hold the transfer in place. Also
I ALWAYS transfer the tiny dry transfer lettering (anything smaller than
3" letters) to decal paper now. The tiny letters are very fragile and can
be tricky to get them directly onto a model.

Tim O'

The transfers will come on a carrier sheet. Some are already laid out for proper spacing/alignment on the car side. Position the lettering so it is in the correct spot and tape one edge of the carrier sheet in place so it will not slip or move. Use the tape as a hinge so you can periodically check your work. Once positioned correctly (you only get one chance with Dry Transfers) take a stylus, blunt pencil, or similar and rub the carrier sheet over the transfer.
Doug Harding


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Tim O'Connor
 

I think Tom has it exactly right -- It's about supply and demand. If the
supply is very small, it doesn't take a lot of demand to hold the line on
price. I've been selling brass models lately (not on Ebay) and I've been
getting my money back and a little extra.

In any case, building those unbuilt resin kits will definitely increase
their value! :-)

Tim O'Connor


Clark continues his clever plan to get us to send him our excess Sunshine kits before they completely lose their value...

The flip answer is that in 5 to 10 years many of us Sunshine hoarders won't be around either. But despite our individual stashes the quantities involved aren't all that large. When some actor bragged to W. C. Fields about the amount of alcohol he consumed, Fields is alleged to have said, "I spill more than that." That's how the resin folks look to the plastic manufacturers. Beginning in 2003 I cast 1165 UTLX X-3 tank shell sets for Martin (300 10K, 275 8K short, 270 8K long and 310 6.5K), and beginning in 2010 did another 325 GATC circumferentially riveted tank sets. Those were big sellers for him, but that's still less than 1500 kits. Today's frantic eBay bidders may not be as uninformed as we think. The X-3s went "above list" on the secondary market not too long after they were introduced, and stayed there despite being in production into 2011. Part of that was due to buyers unwilling to wait for Martín's extended production schedule, but the fact is, resin kits really are ver
y limited production items. If they do drop in value eventually, it won't be because the bubble burst, but because something better obsoleted them.

Tom Madden


Re: Working with dry transfer decals.

ronald parisi
 

Denny:

I only use Dry transfers (INT's) and do 'settle' them down with decal setting solutions.
Then I use Dullcote sprayed over them for permanence and to take weathering chalks better. 
A note on wood models - I do a large area (usually to edges as I noticed that if I only did the area around the INT it had a different 'texture' and showed - that was with the flat paints I use.
I promised and haven't delivered to explain how I hold the INT down with Scotch frosted tape.
With that method the INT doesn't move especially important for multi color circumstances.

Ron Parisi
 


On Mon, Mar 3, 2014 at 11:17 PM, Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...> wrote:
 

I am about to apply  relatively large HO multicolor dry transfer heralds onto the sides of a restored filled-and-finished Ambroid/Northeastern wood-sheathed express reefer.  I have a lot of experience working with and successfully decaling wood models, but no experience at all in applying dry transfers in the same circumstance.  With standard water slide decals, I work with them with various decal setting solutions to get them settled into wood siding seams, ending with slicing the decal at each seam before the final application of solution (usually Walthers).   


A big question:  can decal setting solution be used on dry transfers to get them to settle into seams? 

Denny
  
Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento, CA 

Please note my new eMail address.







Re: Working with dry transfer decals.

Norman+Laraine Larkin
 

As an aside, dry transfers work well as paint masks. Paint the surface your color of choice, apply the transfer (usually lettering), paint the exposed surface a second color, and once the last coat is dry, apply a piece of masking tape to the transfer, and carefully peel the tape off with the mask. The result is a clean and sharp image in your preferred color. Worked really well with Floquil.
Norm Larkin

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tom Baker" <bakert@andrews.edu>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 9:51 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Working with dry transfer decals.


This is an interesting point: I never thought of transferring the dry
transfer to decal paper, coating that with Dullcote or some such
product, and then effecting the transfer. I have never been successful
with dry transfers. Thank you for the tip that will be useful since I
have a number of dry transfers that could be used with this method.

Tom Baker

---
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http://www.avast.com



------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links




Re: Sunshine resale values..

O Fenton Wells
 

I also have too many resin kits but have been thinning out the inventory bit by bit.  Yes I realize I will never build them all but I'm just not sure which ones I still want to keep.  I still love building kits to the detriment of progressing on the layout.  Some days I want to build something completely different.  So I'm keeping some odd ducks along with the normal runners for my favorite road with the knowledge that some day they will go to others.  Building cars is very theraputic for me.
By the way my wife does not share my enthusiasm for the hobby and reminds me constantly that when I "go" they will be out at the curb for the garbage man.  Of course I remind her that on that day I won't really care because where I'm going there is an unlimited supply of resin kits.
By the way I agree with Clark on one thing ( actually I agree with Clark on many things).  Just as the resin kits and the prototype modeling efforts starting in the late 1980's mostly by Mr's Thompson and Hendrickson and these were ground breaking and blew away the modeler.  Something new in  materials and methods will come along and new kits will replace the existing kits.  It may already be happening with the Shake 'N Take type kit bashes.  People are making 'parts' that allow us to bash together a unique and very accurate car by adding custom pieces to existing high volume produced kits   Chad Boas and Tom Madden comes to mind as leaders in this micro market.  
Hey,I'm old enough to remember how cool the Athearn 40 "plastic boxcar was in the mid 1950's and wow it even had operating doors!
Fenton Wells


On Tue, Mar 4, 2014 at 11:00 AM, <pullmanboss@...> wrote:
 

Clark continues his clever plan to get us to send him our excess Sunshine kits before they completely lose their value...


The flip answer is that in 5 to 10 years many of us Sunshine hoarders won't be around either. But despite our individual stashes the quantities involved aren't all that large. When some actor bragged to W. C. Fields about the amount of alcohol he consumed, Fields is alleged to have said, "I spill more than that." That's how the resin folks look to the plastic manufacturers. Beginning in 2003 I cast 1165 UTLX X-3 tank shell sets for Martin (300 10K, 275 8K short, 270 8K long and 310 6.5K), and beginning in 2010 did another 325 GATC circumferentially riveted tank sets. Those were big sellers for him, but that's still less than 1500 kits. Today's frantic eBay bidders may not be as uninformed as we think. The X-3s went "above list" on the secondary market not too long after they were introduced, and stayed there despite being in production into 2011. Part of that was due to buyers unwilling to wait for Martín's extended production schedule, but the fact is, resin kits really are very limited production items. If they do drop in value eventually, it won't be because the bubble burst, but because something better obsoleted them.


Tom Madden




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


ADDRESS Correction...WTB Sunshine Models Kit# 102.12West India Fruit

Dennis Williams
 


Correct address is:   pennsy6200@...

Sorry for the problem.

Dennis Williams

61561 - 61580 of 184241