Date   

Re: Sunshine resale values..

Bruce Smith
 

I think I benefitted from that diaspora.  The kits were bundled in 4 packs, often with little regard for era, but they often sold for about 25% list.  Haven't seen anything like that in some time... and I still haven't built many of the kits.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...] on behalf of westerfieldalfred@... [westerfieldalfred@...]
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 4:00 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..



Pierre was always one of our best customers.  However, we had one builder who would order 100 kits at a time and put the built models on consignment in a large hobby shop.  He died suddenly and his unbuilt kits flooded the market.  We had a few lean months when that happened. – Al Westerfield
 
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 3:42 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..
 
 

While that assessment is supported by a quick glance at one or two shows, I suspect that the reality is a little different.
This hobby today is nothing like the hobby was in the mid 70s when I worked in a hobby shop. And I suspect that in 5-10 years it will have evolved again. Fewer younger people go out to the shows. Fewer people are buying magazines, but I have no trouble selling my services and products.
I submit that the "younger" people who are practicing this dark art of model railroading are just doing it differently.
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 3/4/2014 4:35 PM, Armen Premo wrote:
 
    Just picked up a 1976 copy of MR at a train show.I came home and compared it to the current issue.The size and scope plus the current number of remaining hobby shops tends to indicate that the patient is on life support.Most of the attendees at the show all seemed to be ready for nursing homes or assisted living facilities.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..
 
 

Matt

I had lunch with a friend a couple of weeks ago and we had a good
discussion on his current project building old Walthers wood freight
car kits. Modeling is about doing what you like doing. And yeah I
still build old Athearn kits -- I build them better than Athearn does!

Tim O'

>On a tangent (albeit related), I stopped over to Dads last night and found him assembling 50 year old Globe and Athearn models. Kits never go bad...
>
>(And they actually look decent in spite of their ancient manufacturing processes.)
>
>Matt Goodman
>Columbus, Ohio
>
>Sent from my mobile
>
>On Mar 3, 2014, at 5:02 PM, Tim O'Connor mailto:timboconnor@... wrote:
>
>Clark
>
>People have been predicting the death of model railroading for 50 years...
>I think the current generation raised on RTR may decide, as many of us do
>as we get older, to try something more interesting and challenging -- like
>building prototypical models! That's what makes us modelers, and not just
>collectors.
>
>Tim O'
>
>
>> I've thought about what those with stock piles of kits they'll never build are going to do with them? In my opinion, now would be the best time for them to recoup their money. In another 5-10 years I'm afraid the kits will be next to worthless.
>> Clark Propst
>> Mason City Iowa

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Re: Jones & Laughlin banana oil was Sunshine resale values..

Tom Madden
 

Loaded going up, empty coming down. There were a lot of bananas at Dale that needed oiling.


Tom Madden


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Dennis,

I must be a really slow builder because I spend at least 1-2 hours cleaning up the parts, another 2 hours on the basic build, at least 2 hours on bottom and end detail, and 2-3 hours painting and applying decals. When I add train lines, full retainer valve piping, dirt collectors, and relief valve levers, it takes another 1-2 hours. I've built 46 kits to date, and my build time isn't decreasing, even when I build like cars in batches of 3 to 6 cars at a time. Part of the decal time is spent piecing numbers to model specific cars. Weathering time is over and above build time adding anywhere from a few minutes to an hour.

Do you build all of the piping, use clevises on brake rods, install air hose brackets and air hoses, etc. on commercial builds and still do it all in 6 hours, or does the 6 hour build omit some details?

Nelson



On Mar 4, 2014, at 6:11 AM, Dennis Williams > wrote:

 



Right now I have very close to 300 built kits on my layout. When I have my layout open for the NMRA usually in April, this is the feature they want to see. Trust me, they are overwhelmed.
I have it down to under 6 hours of TOTAL time per car. Some, vin tank, take longer. I build 30 at a time. I always throw a few of mine in also. Build all bodies first, bottom detail next, side details, roof details then end brake detail last. During the winter I work 10 to 12 hours a day on these. My wife's co. is seasonal. A lot of free time in winter.
Building all of the stored kits will take time. Hard part is finding the time for doing the brass restoring.
As for profit, 1 or 2 cars at a time is rough, 4+, way better.
As for how many I built, 1000+ easy. Remember, I have been doing this for many years.
Dennis Williams

------------------------------
On Mon, Mar 3, 2014 8:20 PM PST Tim O'Connor wrote:

>
>Recently I've seen well-built Westerfield models go for between $150 and $200
>on Feebay. If you can get the build time down to 7-8 hours and finish one car a
>day, that's not a terrible living, clearing $100 a car. I believe some people
>on this list have built 500 or more resin kits, so it's not impossible to do.
>
>Tim O'
>
>
>>Dennis,
>>
>>300+ kits is $3,000+ in trucks and couplers (to say nothing of paint and misc. supplies), and over 3000 hours in construction time. Do you have the time and resources to build all those kits in your lifetime?
>>
>>Nelson Moyer
>


Re: Jones & Laughlin banana oil was Sunshine resale values..

Charles Peck
 




---In STMFC@..., <north@...> wrote :

I'm tempted to letter a J&L 20K gal 3 dome tank car for banana oil service.  Covers all bases.


Robert Simpson


When it went over Sherman Hill, was it loaded or empty?  
Chuck Peck

 


Jones & Laughlin banana oil was Sunshine resale values..

Geodyssey
 

I'm tempted to letter a J&L 20K gal 3 dome tank car for banana oil service.  Covers all bases.


Robert Simpson




---In STMFC@..., <prrk41361@...> wrote :

Let's not go into the hobby is dying discussion again please? Next up will be the IC banana topic or freight car distribution. 
The mean age in my club is actually dropping for the first time in Ages with three new members, two twenty something's and one in his thirty's. I'm not the young guy anymore (40) but hope to have 40 years left in me. Local hobby shops are a dying breed but that has more to do with consumer habits than hobbyists. 
Brian Carlson. 


Re: Wrecked boxcar on flat car

Benjamin Hom
 

Richard Townshend asked:
"I am deep into my open loads period and am looking for prototype photos of wrecked steam-era boxcars on steam era flat cars.  Any suggestions?"

Morning Sun's PRR Color Guide Volume 2 has a number of photos of wrecked cars and cars going to scrapping on PRR flatcars.


Ben Hom


Re: Kadee order to make WP car with Chrysler trucks

genegreen1942@...
 

Brake wheel and hand brake in picture are both Ajax.

1.  Everyone please bear in mind that Ajax is the only hand brake, from 1926 to the 1980s, that can be identified by brand name alone.  
2.  Ajax made a point of keeping the same outer housing shape (their word was "envelope") even though the inner mechanisms varied.
3.  In the 1980s Ajax found it necessary to change the envelope.

Statements 1 and 2 are not literally correct.   In the early years Ajax tweaked the envelope some but in HO scale the differences would be barely noticeable.  The presence or absence of a release lever, and whether that release lever was long or short would also be a difference noticeable in just about any scale and seldom modeled in any scale.

With the hand brakes of any other maker it is not enough to say Equipco or Klasing or whatever.  One must also cite a model number to identify a hand brake.  BTW, for those who might be interested, over 300 different hand brakes have been identified  by more than 20 makers.  Geared hand brakes go back to about 1900 even though we tend to think of them as a post-1935 phenomenon.

Gene Green


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Brian Carlson
 

Tim. I'm aware of Railyard models but Gene shut down 2? Years ago. You think sunshine prices go high check those out. I can't get x79, x58 etc for the guys in the club at reasonable prices for learning. I'll go with cheap F&C for that. My first resin kit was a G22b with Al's "do be afraid" DVD. My point was there is no current maker of modern resin kits. 

I'll have to look into Cannon but that's beyond this list

Brian 


On Mar 4, 2014, at 5:39 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

 

Brian

??

Railyard Models resin kits. Quality that blew away anything from Sunshine.
Cannon is bringing out hybrid laser kits similar to Shake N Take, but only
for post-1960.

I saw an astounding variety of great modeling at the Springfield train show
a few weeks ago. One area that is very popular is vehicle modeling in HO scale.
Those guys literally had 15 or more tables packed with an incredible number
of cars, trucks, cranes, trailers, buses, MofW machines, you name it.

Also the meets that STMFC guys love may not reflect the tastes of younger
modelers, which do tend towards post-1960. And many older modelers love the
post-1960 stuff too!

My old train club used to buy subscriptions to Trains and Model Railroader
for the town's high school library. Try it yourself -- You might get some poor
unsuspecting kids hooked!

But as Jerry pointed out, aren't we all having too much fun to worry about it?

Tim O'

>I should also mention. I'll be doing a resin building clinic for some of our interested club members too, so I hope to convert some. I only wish there were resin kits for some modern cars as some of the guys prefer modern stuff that existed after this list.
>Brian Carlson.


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Tim O'Connor
 

Brian

??

Railyard Models resin kits. Quality that blew away anything from Sunshine.
Cannon is bringing out hybrid laser kits similar to Shake N Take, but only
for post-1960.

I saw an astounding variety of great modeling at the Springfield train show
a few weeks ago. One area that is very popular is vehicle modeling in HO scale.
Those guys literally had 15 or more tables packed with an incredible number
of cars, trucks, cranes, trailers, buses, MofW machines, you name it.

Also the meets that STMFC guys love may not reflect the tastes of younger
modelers, which do tend towards post-1960. And many older modelers love the
post-1960 stuff too!

My old train club used to buy subscriptions to Trains and Model Railroader
for the town's high school library. Try it yourself -- You might get some poor
unsuspecting kids hooked!

But as Jerry pointed out, aren't we all having too much fun to worry about it?

Tim O'

I should also mention. I'll be doing a resin building clinic for some of our interested club members too, so I hope to convert some. I only wish there were resin kits for some modern cars as some of the guys prefer modern stuff that existed after this list.
Brian Carlson.


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Marty McGuirk
 

Of course, you might simply be going to the "wrong" shows. A lot of the shows I go to have a much younger contingent of very enthusiastic - and skilled - modelers. And I'm not talking about young parents taking the kiddies out to see Thomas….
Of course, if you're talking about an NMRA event I agree - it's getting a little too easy to confuse some of them with a nursing home. 
Younger people are simply not "joiners" - they interact with others of like interest through means other than the Elks Club, VFW, and, yes, the NMRA. 

Marty McGuirk


Wrecked boxcar on flat car

Richard Townsend
 

I am deep into my open loads period and am looking for prototype photos of wrecked steam-era boxcars on steam era flat cars.  Any suggestions?

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon


Re: Sunshine resale values..

 

Pierre was always one of our best customers.  However, we had one builder who would order 100 kits at a time and put the built models on consignment in a large hobby shop.  He died suddenly and his unbuilt kits flooded the market.  We had a few lean months when that happened. – Al Westerfield
 

Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 3:42 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..
 
 

While that assessment is supported by a quick glance at one or two shows, I suspect that the reality is a little different.
This hobby today is nothing like the hobby was in the mid 70s when I worked in a hobby shop. And I suspect that in 5-10 years it will have evolved again. Fewer younger people go out to the shows. Fewer people are buying magazines, but I have no trouble selling my services and products.
I submit that the "younger" people who are practicing this dark art of model railroading are just doing it differently.
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 3/4/2014 4:35 PM, Armen Premo wrote:
 
    Just picked up a 1976 copy of MR at a train show.I came home and compared it to the current issue.The size and scope plus the current number of remaining hobby shops tends to indicate that the patient is on life support.Most of the attendees at the show all seemed to be ready for nursing homes or assisted living facilities.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..
 
 

Matt

I had lunch with a friend a couple of weeks ago and we had a good
discussion on his current project building old Walthers wood freight
car kits. Modeling is about doing what you like doing. And yeah I
still build old Athearn kits -- I build them better than Athearn does!

Tim O'

>On a tangent (albeit related), I stopped over to Dads last night and found him assembling 50 year old Globe and Athearn models. Kits never go bad...
>
>(And they actually look decent in spite of their ancient manufacturing processes.)
>
>Matt Goodman
>Columbus, Ohio
>
>Sent from my mobile
>
>On Mar 3, 2014, at 5:02 PM, Tim O'Connor mailto:timboconnor@... wrote:
>
>Clark
>
>People have been predicting the death of model railroading for 50 years...
>I think the current generation raised on RTR may decide, as many of us do
>as we get older, to try something more interesting and challenging -- like
>building prototypical models! That's what makes us modelers, and not just
>collectors.
>
>Tim O'
>
>
>> I've thought about what those with stock piles of kits they'll never build are going to do with them? In my opinion, now would be the best time for them to recoup their money. In another 5-10 years I'm afraid the kits will be next to worthless.
>> Clark Propst
>> Mason City Iowa

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4335 / Virus Database: 3705/7151 - Release Date: 03/04/14



Re: Sunshine resale values..

Brian Carlson
 

I should also mention. I'll be doing a resin building clinic for some of our interested club members too, so I hope to convert some. I only wish there were resin kits for some modern cars as some of the guys prefer modern stuff that existed after this list. 
Brian Carlson. 



.


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Brian Carlson
 

Let's not go into the hobby is dying discussion again please? Next up will be the IC banana topic or freight car distribution. 
The mean age in my club is actually dropping for the first time in Ages with three new members, two twenty something's and one in his thirty's. I'm not the young guy anymore (40) but hope to have 40 years left in me. Local hobby shops are a dying breed but that has more to do with consumer habits than hobbyists. 
Brian Carlson. 


On Mar 4, 2014, at 4:35 PM, "Armen Premo" <armprem2@...> wrote:

 

    Just picked up a 1976 copy of MR at a train show.I came home and compared it to the current issue.The size and scope plus the current number of remaining hobby shops tends to indicate that the patient is on life support.Most of the attendees at the show all seemed to be ready for nursing homes or assisted living facilities.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..

 

Matt

I had lunch with a friend a couple of weeks ago and we had a good
discussion on his current project building old Walthers wood freight
car kits. Modeling is about doing what you like doing. And yeah I
still build old Athearn kits -- I build them better than Athearn does!

Tim O'

>On a tangent (albeit related), I stopped over to Dads last night and found him assembling 50 year old Globe and Athearn models. Kits never go bad...
>
>(And they actually look decent in spite of their ancient manufacturing processes.)
>
>Matt Goodman
>Columbus, Ohio
>
>Sent from my mobile
>
>On Mar 3, 2014, at 5:02 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
>
>Clark
>
>People have been predicting the death of model railroading for 50 years...
>I think the current generation raised on RTR may decide, as many of us do
>as we get older, to try something more interesting and challenging -- like
>building prototypical models! That's what makes us modelers, and not just
>collectors.
>
>Tim O'
>
>
>> I've thought about what those with stock piles of kits they'll never build are going to do with them? In my opinion, now would be the best time for them to recoup their money. In another 5-10 years I'm afraid the kits will be next to worthless.
>> Clark Propst
>> Mason City Iowa


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Pierre Oliver <pierre.oliver@...>
 

While that assessment is supported by a quick glance at one or two shows, I suspect that the reality is a little different.
This hobby today is nothing like the hobby was in the mid 70s when I worked in a hobby shop. And I suspect that in 5-10 years it will have evolved again. Fewer younger people go out to the shows. Fewer people are buying magazines, but I have no trouble selling my services and products.
I submit that the "younger" people who are practicing this dark art of model railroading are just doing it differently.
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 3/4/2014 4:35 PM, Armen Premo wrote:

 

    Just picked up a 1976 copy of MR at a train show.I came home and compared it to the current issue.The size and scope plus the current number of remaining hobby shops tends to indicate that the patient is on life support.Most of the attendees at the show all seemed to be ready for nursing homes or assisted living facilities.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..

 

Matt

I had lunch with a friend a couple of weeks ago and we had a good
discussion on his current project building old Walthers wood freight
car kits. Modeling is about doing what you like doing. And yeah I
still build old Athearn kits -- I build them better than Athearn does!

Tim O'

>On a tangent (albeit related), I stopped over to Dads last night and found him assembling 50 year old Globe and Athearn models. Kits never go bad...
>
>(And they actually look decent in spite of their ancient manufacturing processes.)
>
>Matt Goodman
>Columbus, Ohio
>
>Sent from my mobile
>
>On Mar 3, 2014, at 5:02 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
>
>Clark
>
>People have been predicting the death of model railroading for 50 years...
>I think the current generation raised on RTR may decide, as many of us do
>as we get older, to try something more interesting and challenging -- like
>building prototypical models! That's what makes us modelers, and not just
>collectors.
>
>Tim O'
>
>
>> I've thought about what those with stock piles of kits they'll never build are going to do with them? In my opinion, now would be the best time for them to recoup their money. In another 5-10 years I'm afraid the kits will be next to worthless.
>> Clark Propst
>> Mason City Iowa

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4335 / Virus Database: 3705/7151 - Release Date: 03/04/14



Re: Sunshine resale values..

Armand Premo
 

    Just picked up a 1976 copy of MR at a train show.I came home and compared it to the current issue.The size and scope plus the current number of remaining hobby shops tends to indicate that the patient is on life support.Most of the attendees at the show all seemed to be ready for nursing homes or assisted living facilities.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2014 2:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..

 

Matt

I had lunch with a friend a couple of weeks ago and we had a good
discussion on his current project building old Walthers wood freight
car kits. Modeling is about doing what you like doing. And yeah I
still build old Athearn kits -- I build them better than Athearn does!

Tim O'

>On a tangent (albeit related), I stopped over to Dads last night and found him assembling 50 year old Globe and Athearn models. Kits never go bad...
>
>(And they actually look decent in spite of their ancient manufacturing processes.)
>
>Matt Goodman
>Columbus, Ohio
>
>Sent from my mobile
>
>On Mar 3, 2014, at 5:02 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:
>
>Clark
>
>People have been predicting the death of model railroading for 50 years...
>I think the current generation raised on RTR may decide, as many of us do
>as we get older, to try something more interesting and challenging -- like
>building prototypical models! That's what makes us modelers, and not just
>collectors.
>
>Tim O'
>
>
>> I've thought about what those with stock piles of kits they'll never build are going to do with them? In my opinion, now would be the best time for them to recoup their money. In another 5-10 years I'm afraid the kits will be next to worthless.
>> Clark Propst
>> Mason City Iowa


Re: Sunshine resale values..

asychis@...
 

But Allen,
 
If you are dead and buried, why would a loss of interest in transition era modeling be of any concern at all?  This is a curious thread.  We have a lot of kits out there, and others still being produced by Westerfield et al., yet we bemoan the "end of kit building."  I guess we must have too much of a really good thing, and can't accept the fact that life is good right now, and for years to come for transition-era resin kit builders.  I cannot for the life of me think of another craft-type hobby where people complain that they can have too much available.  I ain't never had too much fun!
 
Jerry Michels


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Clark Propst
 

Well, it’s not that I want/need any Sunshine kits. If it’s anything, it’s a ‘haves verse have nots’ thing.
The ‘have nots’ would be a friend that’s a FtDDM&S modeler and would dearly love one of those little MoP rebuilt box cars the FtDDM&S picked up used. He’s the kind of guy that’d probably pay well above list for one too. He’s too busy with his layout to build resin kits, so if he ever found one I’d end up building it... A win, win for both of us. He’d get his representative freight car and I’d have the frustration...I mean...pleasure of building it. It’s all about the play value for your money.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Sunshine resale values..

Tim O'Connor
 

Matt

I had lunch with a friend a couple of weeks ago and we had a good
discussion on his current project building old Walthers wood freight
car kits. Modeling is about doing what you like doing. And yeah I
still build old Athearn kits -- I build them better than Athearn does!

Tim O'

On a tangent (albeit related), I stopped over to Dads last night and found him assembling 50 year old Globe and Athearn models. Kits never go bad...

(And they actually look decent in spite of their ancient manufacturing processes.)

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Mar 3, 2014, at 5:02 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Clark

People have been predicting the death of model railroading for 50 years...
I think the current generation raised on RTR may decide, as many of us do
as we get older, to try something more interesting and challenging -- like
building prototypical models! That's what makes us modelers, and not just
collectors.

Tim O'


I've thought about what those with stock piles of kits they'll never build are going to do with them? In my opinion, now would be the best time for them to recoup their money. In another 5-10 years I'm afraid the kits will be next to worthless.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Working with dry transfer decals.

michaelegross <michaelEGross@...>
 

Very thorough and helpful description of their application, Doug.  I have used Clover House dry transfers for years, particularly their chalk marks, and find them wonderful.

Michael Gross
La Cañada, CA

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