Date   

Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools

Ned Carey
 

Denny Wrote: Pin vise drilling for handrails is more akin to trudging through deep sand than it is to joyful modeling. 
 
I've recently been working though my supply of resin kits. I am loving building these things.
 
One thing that has helped a lot is having the "Magic Drill Bits".  I bought some Guhring drill bits from MSC. I have been using one, a thousandth smaller than a #80 (.0125" vs. .0135").  I have used it both in my small battery dremel and in a pin vise.  As often as not I just spin it in my hand!!!   It has a larger shaft (2MM?) I can turn it with my hand and it easily fits in any drill or pin vise.
 
These are sharp. They drill cleanly and noticeably better than the #78-80 cheap ones I bought in 6 packs. They are more expensive and you need to buy them in packs of 10. Despite being smaller they have significantly outlasted my #80 bits by 5X.  These bits are a joy to use.  
 
I will definitely be ordering these in more sizes.
 
Ned Carey


obscure USRA design hopper

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

Anyone ever come across DSFX 400-439? These are apparently USRA design hoppers acquired circa 1921 by Diamond State Fibre. They are apparently built by Pressed Steel Car and had some connection with PRR, perhaps going to them in the late 1920s. DSF made vulcanized fiber out of cellulose.
 
Thanks,
Eric N.


Re: Finishing Projects vs. Starting New Ones

Misc Clark
 

that's funny, Schuyler...you should write a blog or an article for Model Railroad Hobbyist about procrastination, er, delayed gratification, er, those UFOs everyone has in their workshop...
Clark Cone


On Wed, Mar 5, 2014 at 8:56 PM, Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:
 

Charlie, I really don't know why you work so fast.

I'm not going to embarrass myself with the NUMBER of UFOs (really like that
term) but, well, I have these five EL 67000 series XM cars that I started,
um, back in (shhh) in 19 . . . ah, . . . (mumble, mumble).

Oh, sorry, I'll speak up if I have to. I said 1980 something. If I had
finished these back then, I'd have blown some socks off with the detail.
Now, yeah, well, nice work, but not quite leading edge now. Everything went
well up until I needed the double tapered rotating lever on the plug door
hardware. I'd mastered and had the rollers and the offset pivot parts cast
in brass, made the diagonal sloping levers from the vertical bars, but that
damned rotating lever . . . well, I've solved the part because Branchline
brought out the right car with the right parts and I badgered our good
friend Bill Schneider into selling me a few moldings, but well, there's
another half dozen (yeah, right) projects I need to finish first.

So at around 30 years, these are aging nicely in those boxes right over
THERE.

One other thing: NEVER do five of anything this complex.

Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Charlie Duckworth
Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2014 2:37 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Finishing Projects vs. Starting New Ones


Interesting, I was just thinking about this the other evening. Back in March
1998 Martin Lofton wrote an article in RMC on converting two of Dennis
Storzek's Soo Line boxcar models into NOT&M and StLB&M boxcars. I ordered
two of his kits and started on the NOT&M version shortly there after. At
some point I got bogged down with the project and the carbody went back in
the box.

A few months ago I was looking at one of my Westerfield Fowler boxcars and
noticed the door on the model was a dead ringer for the one on the NOT&M
car. Quick order to Andrew over at Westerfield got me two sets of doors
(part 9998-4452) and I'm happy to report the model is almost
finished......just 16 years after I started.

Charlie Duckworth

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Re: Sunshine resale values.. (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Dave;

I was not really limiting my discussion to plastic, but I see your point there. Some manufacturers of plastic have been disappointed with sales of recent offerings, so we seem to be getting fewer offerings in plastic. The investment is huge, and they have to sell a lot of them to get a decent ROI.

I'd be interested to hear from you what post-war cars are coming out; I may be poorly educating myself on that subject.

But when one looks at what is offered, in both plastic and resin, to complete a WW2, or transition-era fleet, you can actually get there. To model post-steam era fleets is currently impossible unless you like scratchbuilding and doing your own decals.

Actually, most of the folks working with Bowser are encouraging pre-war, not the other way around. I would guess he will continue to take advantage of the HUGE PRR transition-era modeling group, not the much smaller diesel-era group. And there are still cars to do new, or improve what they've got (the Bowser tooling is exquisite...if they would just re-tool off the molded-on grabs and etc.).

I had not seen the W-2....

Elden Gatwood


Subject: RE: [EXTERNAL] Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values.. (UNCLASSIFIED)

Considering how few new mass production pre-war models have been released in the past few years, compared to so many post-war STMFC and modern era cars, some of us are quite happy with Lee's priorities.
Only 6 newly tooled, high volume production, pre-WWII cars have hit the market in the last 3 years that I can recall - the Fox Valley, Tangent, and IM B&O M53's, the IM offset hopper, the Rapido reefer, the Bowser H30, the Tangent 52'6" Bethlehem Gon, and sort-of on BLI's NYC box car (came with post-war details/roof?). In retrospect, actually a pretty good result for WWII modelers, although I think the NYC box was by far the biggest fleet, and it showed up configured post-war. Sigh...

(I think I spotted 2 more in the previous 2 years - the IM War emergency boxcar and the Accurail 41' gon.)

Many manufacturers seem to be working the post war fleet hard, yet everyone in this group can use the 8 pre-war cars above, so I hope no one is discouraging Lee from focusing on pre-war cars. There are some pretty significant pre-war fleets that are still only available in resin, and being significant fleets, building a bunch of resin kits for an adequate representation can be pretty time consuming.


BTW, I did notice the the B&O class W-2 quad offset hopper showed up in BLI's latest YouTube "sneak peek at the 2014 catalog" video.

Dave Evans

---In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:

Tim;

We actually have a working (and relatively recent) relationship now with Bowser; he just has his own list of projects he wants to do, and it appears they are all currently pre-war. We will continue to work to expand that list, which in the case of other producers, is actually working backwards (older and older classes).

Elden Gatwood





Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Re: Sunshine resale values.. (UNCLASSIFIED)

Tangent Scale Models
 

Dave,

A few corrections to your market analysis are in order.

First, Tangent Scale Models nor Intermountain released a B&O M53.  You are thinking of another brand: Exactrail.

Second, you left out the Tangent Scale Models General American 6,000 Gallon 3-compartment tankcar from your list of styrene pre-war models produced within the past three years.  While it is currently sold out (with a new production planned for summer), you can see it here: http://www.tangentscalemodels.com/product-category/sold-out/soldout-generalamerican6000gal3comptankcar/

Finally, I can assure you that Tangent has more up its sleeve for this era, but of course we need more time.

Best Regards,

David Lehlbach
Tangent Scale Models



---In STMFC@..., <devans1@...> wrote :

Elden,

Considering how few new mass production pre-war models have been released in the past few years, compared to so many post-war STMFC and modern era cars, some of us are quite happy with Lee's priorities.

Only 6 newly tooled, high volume production, pre-WWII cars have hit the market in the last 3 years that I can recall - the Fox Valley, Tangent, and IM B&O M53's, the IM offset hopper, the Rapido reefer, the Bowser H30, the Tangent 52'6" Bethlehem Gon, and sort-of on BLI's NYC box car (came with post-war details/roof?). In retrospect, actually a pretty good result for WWII modelers, although I think the NYC box was by far the biggest fleet, and it showed up configured post-war. Sigh...

(I think I spotted 2 more in the previous 2 years - the IM War emergency boxcar and the Accurail 41' gon.)

Many manufacturers seem to be working the post war fleet hard, yet everyone in this group can use the 8 pre-war cars above, so I hope no one is discouraging Lee from focusing on pre-war cars. There are some pretty significant pre-war fleets that are still only available in resin, and being significant fleets, building a bunch of resin kits for an adequate representation can be pretty time consuming.

BTW, I did notice the the B&O class W-2 quad offset hopper showed up in BLI's latest YouTube "sneak peek at the 2014 catalog" video.

Dave Evans


Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

I've had a lot of experience drilling aluminum, and very slow speed and a very sharp bit
works best. A medium weight oil reduces heat. At the proper speed, the shavings will curl in a spiral. If you get small chips, you're drilling to fast. Avoid excessive pressure, and let the bit do the work. Other metals have different properties, requiring different techniques. Maybe a machinist out there will write an article on drilling various metals we use in the hobby.

I find the same approach sans oil works for resin when using a pin vise. CB&Q single sheathed cars have grab iron ladders, and I've drilled several thousand holes using a pin vise and a #79 bit. I use a sharp needle to make a pilot hole, and I have much better control of hole placement then I do with a drill press, mostly because I use an Optivisor when drilling. I use my drill press at medium speed for #50 holes to tap for trucks and couplers and for other less critical purposes. The curl tells me when the speed is right. Drilling resin at high speed will melt it into the bit, and you will have to use laquer thinner to clean the bit. I make far fewer drilling errors with a pin vise, and the time differential for me is insignificant.

Nelson Moyer

On Mar 5, 2014, at 7:16 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:


Denny it's been my experience that higher RPM's (and SHARP drills)
in plastic work very well with a drill press, because you can do a
quick down-and-up move and there is no time for the material to heat
up and melt onto the drill. You can drill with very low RPM's and
that will prevent heating (because the heat disappates), but it will
also take a lot longer to make holes.

Tim O'Connor



I will echo Jack Burgess�s comments on the advantages of precision drilling. Pin vise drilling for handrails is more akin to trudging through deep sand than it is to joyful modeling. (I shudder, brace up, and take a deep draft before tackling any one of my stash of un-grabbed Walthers cars).

However, the comments about drill speed are confusing. Doing this in styrene is hazardous, only less so in resin. It CAN be done is one is disciplined to get in and back out fast. But, slower speeds have been better in my hands. Although I use a MicroMark drill press for most common things, I also have a 12 volt super- precision drill press made by a machinist in Alabama (Braxton??- memory infarct) (who also taught and played violin before his death about ten years ago). He preached a mantra of *slow *drilling with these tiny drills.

Well, intuitively I would guess that high speed might have some considerable value in metals, but all? What types of lubrication might tip the scales one way or another?

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links



Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools

Steve SANDIFER
 

The wandering drill bit is a problem. As with large sizes, a dimple to start the hole works to get the hole where you want it.
 
I use an "off/on" Dremel (not variable speed) hooked to a sewing machine variable speed foot pedal to get slow speeds for drilling in plastic. I have a Rockwell milling machine for other precision type work, but that is overkill for most modeling.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2014 7:37 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools

 

I will echo Jack Burgess’s comments on the advantages of precision drilling. Pin vise drilling for handrails is more akin to trudging through deep sand than it is to joyful modeling.   (I shudder, brace up,  and take a deep draft before tackling any one  of my stash of un-grabbed Walthers cars).


However, the comments about drill speed are confusing. Doing this in styrene is hazardous, only less so in resin. It CAN be done is one is disciplined to get in and back out fast. But, slower speeds have been better in my hands.  Although I use a MicroMark drill press for most common things, I also have a 12 volt super- precision drill press made by a machinist in Alabama  (Braxton??-  memory infarct)  (who also taught and played violin before his death about ten years ago). He preached a mantra of *slow *drilling with these tiny drills.

Well, intuitively I would guess that high speed might have some considerable value in metals, but all?  What types of lubrication might tip the scales one way or another?

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento





Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools

Richard Townsend
 

I will echo what others have said about the delights of precision miniature drill presses.  For a long time I was intending to build one following a Ben King article from a old Model Railroader.  I suspect that the Brazelton drill press was based on Mr. King's article.  By the time I decided I would never get around to building one and that I should just knuckle down and buy a Brazelton, he was out of business.  I saved my pennies and ended up buying a Cameron drill press.  Many, many pennies.  But it was worth it.  When I first got it I tried it out and was disappointed to learn that even at its slowest speed with a quick in and out I was melting plastic onto the drill bits.  Jack Burgess was kind enough to advise me to buy one of the Dremel "Solid State" speed controls, and even pointed one out on eBay.  I bought one and have been happy as can be ever since.  Pin vise drilling grab iron poles was pure, frustrating, broken-bit drudgery; drilling them with the drill press is a pleasure.
 
Now I'm saving my pennies for a precision miniature table saw.
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon

-----Original Message-----
From: Anspach Denny
To: Era Freight Car List Steam
Sent: Wed, Mar 5, 2014 5:37 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools

 
I will echo Jack Burgess’s comments on the advantages of precision drilling. Pin vise drilling for handrails is more akin to trudging through deep sand than it is to joyful modeling.   (I shudder, brace up,  and take a deep draft before tackling any one  of my stash of un-grabbed Walthers cars).

However, the comments about drill speed are confusing. Doing this in styrene is hazardous, only less so in resin. It CAN be done is one is disciplined to get in and back out fast. But, slower speeds have been better in my hands.  Although I use a MicroMark drill press for most common things, I also have a 12 volt super- precision drill press made by a machinist in Alabama  (Braxton??-  memory infarct)  (who also taught and played violin before his death about ten years ago). He preached a mantra of *slow *drilling with these tiny drills.

Well, intuitively I would guess that high speed might have some considerable value in metals, but all?  What types of lubrication might tip the scales one way or another?

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento





Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools

Tim O'Connor
 

Denny it's been my experience that higher RPM's (and SHARP drills)
in plastic work very well with a drill press, because you can do a
quick down-and-up move and there is no time for the material to heat
up and melt onto the drill. You can drill with very low RPM's and
that will prevent heating (because the heat disappates), but it will
also take a lot longer to make holes.

Tim O'Connor

I will echo Jack Burgess�s comments on the advantages of precision drilling. Pin vise drilling for handrails is more akin to trudging through deep sand than it is to joyful modeling. (I shudder, brace up, and take a deep draft before tackling any one of my stash of un-grabbed Walthers cars).

However, the comments about drill speed are confusing. Doing this in styrene is hazardous, only less so in resin. It CAN be done is one is disciplined to get in and back out fast. But, slower speeds have been better in my hands. Although I use a MicroMark drill press for most common things, I also have a 12 volt super- precision drill press made by a machinist in Alabama (Braxton??- memory infarct) (who also taught and played violin before his death about ten years ago). He preached a mantra of *slow *drilling with these tiny drills.

Well, intuitively I would guess that high speed might have some considerable value in metals, but all? What types of lubrication might tip the scales one way or another?

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools

Jack Burgess
 

A chat list member who is also modeling the YVRR (yes, there is more than one) e-mailed me off-list with the same general question regarding drilling speeds. The slowest that my drill press runs based just on the belt setting is 9500 RPM. Therefore, I have an old Dremel "Solid State" rheostat that I use (you can tell it is old when the manufacturer advertises it as "Solid State"!) I keep it very slow for styrene (enough to drill a hole, the smaller the bit, the slower the speed) so that the styrene won't melt. I use a moderate speed for resin and wood. I never run it at 7500 RPM even when drilling metal...if I'm getting chips coming out of the hole, I feel that I running it at a reasonable speed...I never add an lubrication since I don't know what to use and that would one more thing to clean up. List members such as Dennis, Brian, and others could add some real knowledge here...I was a civil engineer in my prior life and have never taken any kind of machining class.

 

(At the highest belt "setting", my drill press runs at 30,000 RPM...I have no idea what one would drill at that speed but the drill press was designed for electronics R&D shops, jewelers, physics labs, etc. This list certainly doesn't include model railroaders.)

 

I use carbide drill bits in sizes 71-80 for a lot of things including styrene, resin, and especially brass. Wire drill bits tend to wander and "draw circles", especially on brass but the carbide ones don't. But they are also very brittle and can't take any side pressure. So, in situations where I'm drilling a deep hole, I'll start the hole with a carbide drill bit and finish up with a wire drill bit. I get all of my drill bits from Drill Bit City.

 

Jack Burgess

 

 

I will echo Jack Burgess’s comments on the advantages of precision drilling. Pin vise drilling for handrails is more akin to trudging through deep sand than it is to joyful modeling.   (I shudder, brace up,  and take a deep draft before tackling any one  of my stash of un-grabbed Walthers cars).

 

However, the comments about drill speed are confusing. Doing this in styrene is hazardous, only less so in resin. It CAN be done is one is disciplined to get in and back out fast. But, slower speeds have been better in my hands.  Although I use a MicroMark drill press for most common things, I also have a 12 volt super- precision drill press made by a machinist in Alabama  (Braxton??-  memory infarct)  (who also taught and played violin before his death about ten years ago). He preached a mantra of *slow *drilling with these tiny drills.

 

Well, intuitively I would guess that high speed might have some considerable value in metals, but all?  What types of lubrication might tip the scales one way or another?

 

Denny

 

Denny S. Anspach MD

Sacramento

 

 

 

 





Re: Finishing Projects vs. Starting New Ones

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Charlie, I really don't know why you work so fast.



I'm not going to embarrass myself with the NUMBER of UFOs (really like that
term) but, well, I have these five EL 67000 series XM cars that I started,
um, back in (shhh) in 19 . . . ah, . . . (mumble, mumble).



Oh, sorry, I'll speak up if I have to. I said 1980 something. If I had
finished these back then, I'd have blown some socks off with the detail.
Now, yeah, well, nice work, but not quite leading edge now. Everything went
well up until I needed the double tapered rotating lever on the plug door
hardware. I'd mastered and had the rollers and the offset pivot parts cast
in brass, made the diagonal sloping levers from the vertical bars, but that
damned rotating lever . . . well, I've solved the part because Branchline
brought out the right car with the right parts and I badgered our good
friend Bill Schneider into selling me a few moldings, but well, there's
another half dozen (yeah, right) projects I need to finish first.



So at around 30 years, these are aging nicely in those boxes right over
THERE.



One other thing: NEVER do five of anything this complex.





Schuyler



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Charlie Duckworth
Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2014 2:37 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Finishing Projects vs. Starting New Ones





Interesting, I was just thinking about this the other evening. Back in March
1998 Martin Lofton wrote an article in RMC on converting two of Dennis
Storzek's Soo Line boxcar models into NOT&M and StLB&M boxcars. I ordered
two of his kits and started on the NOT&M version shortly there after. At
some point I got bogged down with the project and the carbody went back in
the box.

A few months ago I was looking at one of my Westerfield Fowler boxcars and
noticed the door on the model was a dead ringer for the one on the NOT&M
car. Quick order to Andrew over at Westerfield got me two sets of doors
(part 9998-4452) and I'm happy to report the model is almost
finished......just 16 years after I started.

Charlie Duckworth


Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools

Anspach Denny <danspachmd@...>
 

I will echo Jack Burgess’s comments on the advantages of precision drilling. Pin vise drilling for handrails is more akin to trudging through deep sand than it is to joyful modeling.   (I shudder, brace up,  and take a deep draft before tackling any one  of my stash of un-grabbed Walthers cars).

However, the comments about drill speed are confusing. Doing this in styrene is hazardous, only less so in resin. It CAN be done is one is disciplined to get in and back out fast. But, slower speeds have been better in my hands.  Although I use a MicroMark drill press for most common things, I also have a 12 volt super- precision drill press made by a machinist in Alabama  (Braxton??-  memory infarct)  (who also taught and played violin before his death about ten years ago). He preached a mantra of *slow *drilling with these tiny drills.

Well, intuitively I would guess that high speed might have some considerable value in metals, but all?  What types of lubrication might tip the scales one way or another?

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento





Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools

Dennis Williams
 

Sreies CC,  Jewelers drill. Simular to the Dremel with cablebut MUCH better.  Even holds #80 dril bit.
 
Dennis Williams/Owner


On Wednesday, March 5, 2014 6:44 PM, gary laakso wrote:
 
Dennis, which model of the many from Foredom are you using? 
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
 
Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2014 12:15 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools
 
 
Jack.
  Trust me, it took a long time with a pin vise.  With the Foredom, I can do 25 cars in just over 30 minutes.  I know it is hard to believe but I timed it once.  Have to keep the RPMs high to keep the bit from walking.  This also keeps them from breaking. Why not a Dremel??   Too big and not enough control.    Dennis 


This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.




Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools

gary laakso
 

Dennis, which model of the many from Foredom are you using? 
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
 

Sent: Wednesday, March 05, 2014 12:15 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine resale values..Now tools
 
 

Jack.

  Trust me, it took a long time with a pin vise.  With the Foredom, I can do 25 cars in just over 30 minutes.  I know it is hard to believe but I timed it once.  Have to keep the RPMs high to keep the bit from walking.  This also keeps them from breaking. Why not a Dremel??   Too big and not enough control.    Dennis 




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Re: CRI&P 53' war gons

Rich C
 

Right you are Tim, they are from GS gon drop doors. What also makes these cars unique is the "PS" style ends.

Around the fifties I guess many were converted to piggyback service with all side sheathing removed. They were just a skeletal frame.

Someone at one time was going to produce that version, anyone know if that ever came about?

Rich Christie


On Wednesday, March 5, 2014 4:25 PM, Rod Miller wrote:
 
On 3/5/14, 1:23 PM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI wrote:
> Does anyone make this car without the wood sides molded in?
>
> Thanks!
> --
>
> Brian Ehni
>

Not applicable for scales other than O, however
Pecos River Brass imported them in O scale. Sold out,
they sometimes come up on eBay and at O scale meets.

They also imported the composite cars with pre-cut
stripwood for the sides and floors (also for the
floors in the CRI&P cars).

Rod

--

Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale West / S West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2015 Meet is Feb 5 - 7
http://www.rodmiller.com | http://www.oscalewest.com



Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Re: Sunshine resale values.. (UNCLASSIFIED)

devansprr
 

Elden,

Considering how few new mass production pre-war models have been released in the past few years, compared to so many post-war STMFC and modern era cars, some of us are quite happy with Lee's priorities.

Only 6 newly tooled, high volume production, pre-WWII cars have hit the market in the last 3 years that I can recall - the Fox Valley, Tangent, and IM B&O M53's, the IM offset hopper, the Rapido reefer, the Bowser H30, the Tangent 52'6" Bethlehem Gon, and sort-of on BLI's NYC box car (came with post-war details/roof?). In retrospect, actually a pretty good result for WWII modelers, although I think the NYC box was by far the biggest fleet, and it showed up configured post-war. Sigh...

(I think I spotted 2 more in the previous 2 years - the IM War emergency boxcar and the Accurail 41' gon.)

Many manufacturers seem to be working the post war fleet hard, yet everyone in this group can use the 8 pre-war cars above, so I hope no one is discouraging Lee from focusing on pre-war cars. There are some pretty significant pre-war fleets that are still only available in resin, and being significant fleets, building a bunch of resin kits for an adequate representation can be pretty time consuming.

BTW, I did notice the the B&O class W-2 quad offset hopper showed up in BLI's latest YouTube "sneak peek at the 2014 catalog" video.

Dave Evans

---In STMFC@..., <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:

Tim;
We actually have a working (and relatively recent) relationship now with Bowser; he just has his own list of projects he wants to do, and it appears they are all currently pre-war. We will continue to work to expand that list, which in the case of other producers, is actually working backwards (older and older classes).

Elden Gatwood


Re: CRI&P 53' war gons

Rod Miller
 

On 3/5/14, 1:23 PM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI wrote:
Does anyone make this car without the wood sides molded in?

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

Not applicable for scales other than O, however
Pecos River Brass imported them in O scale. Sold out,
they sometimes come up on eBay and at O scale meets.

They also imported the composite cars with pre-cut
stripwood for the sides and floors (also for the
floors in the CRI&P cars).

Rod

--

Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale West / S West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2015 Meet is Feb 5 - 7
http://www.rodmiller.com | http://www.oscalewest.com


Re: CRI&P 53' war gons

 

This seems to have complete die cast sides. http://tinyurl.com/ltvz9hv
I did see another Ulrich SS box kit with die cast bracing, though.

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@opendoor.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at 3:55 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] CRI&P 53' war gons







On Mar 5, 2014, at 1:45 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:


Sunshine did, I think

At 3/5/2014 04:23 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
Does anyone make this car without the wood sides molded in?

Brian Ehni
The old Ulrich kits, if you could find one, had die cast side framing and
wood sheathing. They were very good, despite their age - light years ahead
of what MDC, Varney, Silver Streak, etc. were doing at that time - and with
some additional detailing make up into very nice models by current
standards.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: CRI&P 53' war gons

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Mar 5, 2014, at 1:45 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Sunshine did, I think

At 3/5/2014 04:23 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
>Does anyone make this car without the wood sides molded in?
>
>Brian Ehni
>

The old Ulrich kits, if you could find one, had die cast side framing and wood sheathing.  They were very good, despite their age - light years ahead of what MDC, Varney, Silver Streak, etc. were doing at that time - and with some additional detailing make up into very nice models by current standards.

Richard Hendrickson



Re: CRI&P 53' war gons

 

Unless they redid the kit, no; I have a Sunshine from the days when F&C cast
them from the yellow resin, and it has sides cast in. I’m thinking the Tichy
kit would be the best to use, but you’d have to carve off the sides somehow


Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at 3:45 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] CRI&P 53' war gons








Sunshine did, I think

At 3/5/2014 04:23 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
Does anyone make this car without the wood sides molded in?

Brian Ehni

On Mar 5, 2014, at 9:17 AM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:

Richard is it possible that the corrugated panels are actually drop-doors
from General Service style gondolas? They kinda look that way to me, and I
think Rock Island had a supply of those cars built in the 1930's?
Tim, they appear to be either Dreadnaught drop doors with one edge cut off
or Dreadnaught gondola ends cut in half.

Richard Hendrickson








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