Date   

Re: Scientific nomenclature

Tim O'Connor
 


That's correct. Carmen cut levers were exceptionally high spirited and flirtatious.


Andy, those are �Carmer� levers, not �carmen� levers.  Carmer was a specific design and a particular manufacturer.
 
Schuyler
 
From: STMFC@... [ mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Andrew Miller

Clark,

I believe it is called a "cut lever". I always hear of one variety common
on the PRR in the 30s as a "Carmen cut lever".

Regards,

Andy Miller


Re: Scientific nomenclature

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

I'd guess coupler (or pin) lift bar would apply only when the lever went to the top of the coupler.
 
Eric N.
 

 

Hi Clark,

Formally (as in Cyclopedias) it's the "uncoupling lever," but many railroaders call it the "cut lever" for what it does. "Coupler lift bar" is a model railroad term as far as I can tell.

So long,

Andy


Re: Scientific nomenclature

Andy Sperandeo
 

Hi Clark,

Formally (as in Cyclopedias) it's the "uncoupling lever," but many railroaders call it the "cut lever" for what it does. "Coupler lift bar" is a model railroad term as far as I can tell.

So long,

Andy


Re: Decal problems

Pierre Oliver
 

Denny,
I had a similar experience some years ago. Wound up stripping some of the paint and redecaling.
The ink wouldn't soften with setting solution 
Contact me off list for the gory details.
Pierre Oliver


On May 4, 2014, at 3:22 PM, Anspach Denny <danspachmd@...> wrote:

 

Not so long ago, Bill Darnaby reported application problems with some custom decals (Alps) that he was attempting to apply, namely that they simply would not settle or draw down, no matter what.  Well, I think that I have similar problem, mine with some otherwise-stunning  custom decals from another maker who also produces them on an Alps printer.  I suspect that both may be using the same decal papers.


I have posed this question to the supplier, but have not yet received a reply.

My problems: 

1) The decals will simply will not separate nor slide without a lot of physical pushing and shoving (soft brush, tooth pick), even with soaking to the extent that the relatively thick paper backing completely delaminates (often at the very moment that one is attempting to transfer the decal). 

2) Instead of floating or sliding, the decal clings to the paper, commonly wrapping itself or twisting around the paper edge,  twisting over often onto the backside, sometimes upside down. Undoing this commonly results in collateral damage, losing either parts of the decal, or the ink chipping off!

3) The decals will simply not settle down over rivets, etc., despite a desperation application of Walthers SolvaSet. 

3) I have already used up the principal parts of two decal sets on one incompleted model in probably a net 6 hours of intermittent  effort, and I have just made an executive decision  scrape a bunch off and repaint before I have more damage.  I never, ever have had such difficulty in decal application.  Whew!  Unless otherwise solved in the meantime, I will try to cobble together some replacements from Microscale sets. 

Do my experiences ring any bells in the minds of other users?  Would the crippling and overwhelming surface tension characteristics demonstrated by these decals be ameliorated by using water with a drop of detergent (diluted big time, of course), or would the detergent interfere with decal adhesion, and or cause some discoloration or haziness?

Denny
 
Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento





Decal problems

Anspach Denny <danspachmd@...>
 

Not so long ago, Bill Darnaby reported application problems with some custom decals (Alps) that he was attempting to apply, namely that they simply would not settle or draw down, no matter what.  Well, I think that I have similar problem, mine with some otherwise-stunning  custom decals from another maker who also produces them on an Alps printer.  I suspect that both may be using the same decal papers.

I have posed this question to the supplier, but have not yet received a reply.

My problems: 

1) The decals will simply will not separate nor slide without a lot of physical pushing and shoving (soft brush, tooth pick), even with soaking to the extent that the relatively thick paper backing completely delaminates (often at the very moment that one is attempting to transfer the decal). 

2) Instead of floating or sliding, the decal clings to the paper, commonly wrapping itself or twisting around the paper edge,  twisting over often onto the backside, sometimes upside down. Undoing this commonly results in collateral damage, losing either parts of the decal, or the ink chipping off!

3) The decals will simply not settle down over rivets, etc., despite a desperation application of Walthers SolvaSet. 

3) I have already used up the principal parts of two decal sets on one incompleted model in probably a net 6 hours of intermittent  effort, and I have just made an executive decision  scrape a bunch off and repaint before I have more damage.  I never, ever have had such difficulty in decal application.  Whew!  Unless otherwise solved in the meantime, I will try to cobble together some replacements from Microscale sets. 

Do my experiences ring any bells in the minds of other users?  Would the crippling and overwhelming surface tension characteristics demonstrated by these decals be ameliorated by using water with a drop of detergent (diluted big time, of course), or would the detergent interfere with decal adhesion, and or cause some discoloration or haziness?

Denny
 
Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento





Re: Scientific nomenclature

Tony Thompson
 

Andrew Miller wrote:

I believe it is called a "cut lever". I always hear of one variety common on the PRR in the 30s as a "Carmen cut lever".


      That would be "Carmer," name of the maker of a specific product.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Scientific nomenclature

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Andy, those are “Carmer” levers, not ‘carmen’ levers.  Carmer was a specific design and a particular manufacturer.

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Andrew Miller
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2014 11:36 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Scientific nomenclature

 

 

Clark,

I believe it is called a "cut lever". I always hear of one variety common
on the PRR in the 30s as a "Carmen cut lever".

Regards,

Andy Miller

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
cepropst@q.com
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2014 10:07 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [STMFC] Scientific nomenclature

Does the lever (top or bottom mount) that allows/opens the coupler knuckle
have a real railroad engineering type name?

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: erie 82582 Branchline 40' AAR boxcar kit 6' door, delivery scheme

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 3, 2014, at 10:54 PM, Robert <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

I am assembling this kit and running into questions not answered in the instructions.  I probably should have tried some of these kits 10 years ago when they were commonly discussed on this list, but . . . this is my first Branchline kit.   So questions:
1) is this a foobie?

No.  Bill Schnieder would be offended at the suggestion.

 2) should the running board be black or silver?

From what’s visible in the builder’s photos, it appears to have been mineral red except at the extreme end, which were black like the car ends.

3) what is proper ladder choice for the car sides – the wider or narrower?

8 rung ladders.

4) there nothing in the kit to create the running board lateral supports – I supply those myself?

Yes.

I’m sending you off-list 3/4 left and B end builder’s photos.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: erie 82582 Branchline 40' AAR boxcar kit 6' door, delivery scheme

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Nuts, I should have added that there is a diagram book in the Erie/EL/DL&W section that can define the group of cars you’re dealing with.

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Robert
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2014 12:31 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: erie 82582 Branchline 40' AAR boxcar kit 6' door, delivery scheme

 

 

Thanks Clark,

 

Its confusing as the kit contains a narrow set of black ladders (i.e. for ends) and two sets of brown ladders – narrow and wide - (for the sides).  Also, the wide ladders are 7 rung instead of 8, so using wide would result in rungs on the side ladders not lining up with those on the end ladders.   I couldn’t find a prototype photo of this series.

 

Rob

 

Sent: Sunday, May 4, 2014 6:12 AM

Subject: [STMFC] Re: erie 82582 Branchline 40' AAR boxcar kit 6' door, delivery scheme

 




We’ve always used the wider ladders on the sides and the narrower ones on the ends.

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: erie 82582 Branchline 40' AAR boxcar kit 6' door, delivery scheme

Schuyler Larrabee
 

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie82525bdb.jpg

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie82525adb.jpg

 

Rob, these should answer your questions, though I suspect you have a large (six foot) diamond on your model, which is what you probably want.  The small diamond was replaced with larger one quite quickly after these cars were built.

 

If you (and of you) are seeking prototype photos of freight equipment, the Fallen Flags site owned by George Elwood should be a first resort.

 

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Robert
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2014 12:31 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: erie 82582 Branchline 40' AAR boxcar kit 6' door, delivery scheme

 

 

Thanks Clark,

 

Its confusing as the kit contains a narrow set of black ladders (i.e. for ends) and two sets of brown ladders – narrow and wide - (for the sides).  Also, the wide ladders are 7 rung instead of 8, so using wide would result in rungs on the side ladders not lining up with those on the end ladders.   I couldn’t find a prototype photo of this series.

 

Rob

 

Sent: Sunday, May 4, 2014 6:12 AM

Subject: [STMFC] Re: erie 82582 Branchline 40' AAR boxcar kit 6' door, delivery scheme

 




We’ve always used the wider ladders on the sides and the narrower ones on the ends.

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Scientific nomenclature

Richard Hendrickson
 


On May 4, 2014, at 8:50 AM, destorzek@... wrote:

In the 1922 CBC, all other alternate terms re-direct to this:

"Uncoupling Lever or Uncoupling Rod. An iron rod with a bent handle forming a lever, usually attached to the end sill, by which the lock of the automatic coupler is opened and the cars uncoupled without going between them. The lever proper is the part attached to the rod and operating the unlocking mechanism, but in the case of freight cars the lever and rod are generally made in one piece. In passenger equipment cars the lever is located on the platform or in the vestibule. The short lever which is directly connected to a passenger coupler is also sometimes called an uncoupling lever. Figs. 1237, 1325-1339."

The listing was unchanged in the 1946 CBC, except for eliminating the reference to specific figures.

I will add to this that (also in the 1946 CBCyc) the Standard Railway Equipment Co. described its uncoupling mechanisms, both top and bottom operated, as “coupler release rigging” and the bottom operated type as “rotary coupler release rigging.”  By 1953, Standard had developed a version of the rotary bottom-operated uncoupling rod which it described as a "coupler device,” though the official AAR terminology continued to be “uncoupling rod.”  Later, with the development of long-travel cushion underframes, the increased rage of motion between draft gear and car body required some sort of sliding or articulated arrangement of uncoupling rod, and it then became common to call that arrangement an “uncoupling mechanism,” though that was just beginning to appear ca. 1960.

In any case, Eric Neubauer is right that “cut lever” was colloquial usage, and though common among railroad operating department and car shop crews, it was not used in railway engineering practice. 

Finally, while we’re on the subject of terminology, some model railroaders are in the habit of referring to the Standard Railway Equipment Co. as “Stanray,” and that is incorrect in the steam era.  Stanray was a corporation that evolved out of the Standard Railway Equipment Co., but not until well after the period covered by the STMFC list. 

Richard Hendrickson



Re: erie 82582 Branchline 40' AAR boxcar kit 6' door, delivery scheme

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks Clark,
 
Its confusing as the kit contains a narrow set of black ladders (i.e. for ends) and two sets of brown ladders – narrow and wide - (for the sides).  Also, the wide ladders are 7 rung instead of 8, so using wide would result in rungs on the side ladders not lining up with those on the end ladders.   I couldn’t find a prototype photo of this series.
 
Rob
 

Sent: Sunday, May 4, 2014 6:12 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: erie 82582 Branchline 40' AAR boxcar kit 6' door, delivery scheme
 


We’ve always used the wider ladders on the sides and the narrower ones on the ends.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Scientific nomenclature

destorzek@...
 

In the 1922 CBC, all other alternate terms re-direct to this:

"Uncoupling Lever or Uncoupling Rod. An iron rod with a bent handle forming a lever, usually attached to the end sill, by which the lock of the automatic coupler is opened and the cars uncoupled without going between them. The lever proper is the part attached to the rod and operating the unlocking mechanism, but in the case of freight cars the lever and rod are generally made in one piece. In passenger equipment cars the lever is located on the platform or in the vestibule. The short lever which is directly connected to a passenger coupler is also sometimes called an uncoupling lever. Figs. 1237, 1325-1339."

The listing was unchanged in the 1946 CBC, except for eliminating the reference to specific figures.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Scientific nomenclature

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

"Uncoupling lever" is official per CBD. "Cut lever" appears to be colloquial, but probably widely used.
 
Eric N.
 

----- Original Message -----
To: STMFC
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2014 10:07 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Scientific nomenclature

 

Does the lever (top or bottom mount) that allows/opens the coupler knuckle have a real railroad engineering type name?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Scientific nomenclature

Michael Watnoski
 

The sheet metal type is a 'Carmer cut lever'. I believe the technical term is 'pin lifter'.

Michael

On 5/4/2014 11:35 AM, Andrew Miller wrote:
Clark,


I believe it is called a "cut lever". I always hear of one variety common
on the PRR in the 30s as a "Carmen cut lever".


Regards,


Andy Miller


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
cepropst@q.com
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2014 10:07 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [STMFC] Scientific nomenclature



Does the lever (top or bottom mount) that allows/opens the coupler knuckle
have a real railroad engineering type name?

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa








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Re: Scientific nomenclature

Andy Miller
 

Clark,



I believe it is called a "cut lever". I always hear of one variety common
on the PRR in the 30s as a "Carmen cut lever".



Regards,



Andy Miller



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
cepropst@q.com
Sent: Sunday, May 04, 2014 10:07 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [STMFC] Scientific nomenclature





Does the lever (top or bottom mount) that allows/opens the coupler knuckle
have a real railroad engineering type name?

Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Scientific nomenclature

Clark Propst
 

Does the lever (top or bottom mount) that allows/opens the coupler knuckle have a real railroad engineering type name?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: erie 82582 Branchline 40' AAR boxcar kit 6' door, delivery scheme

Clark Propst
 

We’ve always used the wider ladders on the sides and the narrower ones on the ends.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


erie 82582 Branchline 40' AAR boxcar kit 6' door, delivery scheme

Robert kirkham
 

I am assembling this kit and running into questions not answered in the instructions.  I probably should have tried some of these kits 10 years ago when they were commonly discussed on this list, but . . . this is my first Branchline kit.   So questions:
1) is this a foobie? 
2) should the running board be black or silver?
3) what is proper ladder choice for the car sides – the wider or narrower?
4) there nothing in the kit to create the running board lateral supports – I supply those myself?
 
Thanks in advance,
 
Rob Kirkham 


Re: Red Caboose Northern Pacific reefer

Andy Carlson
 

I have been told by Jerry Glow to use the RC reefer wood hatch covers.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


From: "ed_mines@..."
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, May 3, 2014 12:25 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Red Caboose Northern Pacific reefer

 
 What hatches should be used when switching to a Central Valley roof?
 
Ed Mines


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