Date   

Daily carload reports by station Re: Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?

kruegerp@...
 

Another interesting source of data, though probably not as good as conductor train lists for some types of analysis, are daily carload reports from stations.

The link below is a photo of one of these reports, the top of a packet for the whole month.  It includes car numbers, reporting marks, destination, commodity, shipper, consignee, and routing information.
http://www.milwelectric.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Carload-shipments-forwarded-from-Elbe-1930-12-31.jpg

 

Cascade Rail Foundation has boxes of these reports for Milwaukee Road stations in Washington, mostly for stations south of Tacoma but also some for stations south and east of Seattle into central Washington.  Seattle and points west or north must have been stored in Seattle because we don't have any (these came from the Tacoma office).  The time range for these documents is mainly the late 1920s to the late 1930s.  In some cases, there are complete years for stations.


If anyone in the Seattle area would like to help organize and digitize these documents, please contact me at kruegerp@... (kruegerp [at] nwlink [dot] com).  Cascade Rail Foundation is a member organization of Pacific Northwest Railroad Archive in Burien, WA and the materials are located there.


I'm sure other railroads had this kind of report.  Anyone know of any that have survived?


Thanks,
Paul


Paul Krueger

Secretary

Cascade Rail Foundation

http://www.milwelectric.org

"Remembering the Milwaukee Road in Washington"


Re: terra cotta roofing tiles

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Winfield, IA was once home to the Merillat Road Construction Co., a large producer of culverts of various types that distributed throughout Iowa and probably in Western Illinois and Northeastern Missouri. L. B. Pierce Brick and Tile Factory and E. C. Smith Sash and Door Factory were also located there. Winfield was and still is a small town in East Central Iowa. It was served by the CB&Q and the M&StL, so rail shipments are probable, given the state of rural roads in the 1920-30s. I have photos of all of these industries, but I don’t know who, if anyone, retains the rights, so I can’t post them to the photo section at this time. That’s a shame, because they’re too good not to be distributed to a group that would fully appreciate them. I photographed the photographs and copies of photographs at the Winfield Historical Society a couple of years ago. I’ll inquire about posting them.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent:
Monday, May 26, 2014 2:20 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] terra cotta roofing tiles

 

 

I think you are correct I know in the south east clay building products were very local.  Tile, pipe and brick plants, albeit it very small were in almost every town.    I know early on bricks were made at the construction site.

Fenton Wells

 

On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 3:11 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Fenton and Group,

 

I suspect that the cast iron pipe and concrete pipe were produced in major population areas and that terra cotta roof tiles and pipe were more of a local production product. 

 

How local? One of the projects that I worked on some years back was the restoration of a vaudeville theater in Newport Beach, California. The building was constructed around 1927-1928. The building had a clay tile roof and we soon discovered that the clay tiles were hand made. Actually hand formed over the leg of fellow doing the manufacture. These roof tiles may have been made right on the construction site. The existing roof tiles still showed the finger prints of the person doing the forming. Life — and construction methods — were a lot different that what we see today almost 85 years on.

 

Cheers,

Bill Keene

Irvine, CA

 

 

 

On May 26, 2014, at 11:27 AM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



 

Bill I wish someone would make the pipes in resin.  The dimensions of the pipe and the ends are available on line by googling cast iron pipe.  The mechanical joint appears to be the most common pipe joint in the 1950's for water and sewer plants.  If you model the south or have cars from there you would have seen lots of gons of this stuff back then.

From what I understand and I don't have any facts but the structural tile pipe and other shapes used for storm drains and foundation drains and chimney liners were carried mostly by truck.  However I am sure some went by rail.  I just don't have any documents for that

Fenton Wells

 

On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Hi Ed and Group,

 

A number of years ago, I pulled down of a web site an image of SLSF 85954, a USRA composite gondola, loaded with what appears to be cast iron pipe of about — guessing here — 18-feet in length. There are partial images of similar cars coupled to both ends of this car also loaded with cast iron pipe. The date of the photo is given as 1958, which could be considered as a fairly late date for a USRA car to be in service. My plan is to model this car and load. 

 

I doubt that anyone would walk away carrying one of these lengths of pipe. 

 

Cheers,

Bill Keene

Irvine, CA

 

 

On May 25, 2014, at 1:17 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



 

 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines

 

 

 



 

-- 
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane

Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...

 

 



 

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane

Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4592 / Virus Database: 3950/7565 - Release Date: 05/26/14


Re: PRR K8 stock car L&N kitbash possibilities? ACL & C&O too?

Bruce Smith
 

Bill,

I believe Steve will be making some of these available as flat kits in the near future, IIRC.

regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, May 25, 2014 2:18 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] PRR K8 stock car L&N kitbash possibilities? ACL & C&O too?



Recently someone noted that F&C had introduced a one-piece body model of the Penny's K8 stockcar. This car featured a Pratt Truss frame with Hat Section vertical and diagonal steel braces. There are no details about this kit on F&C's website as yet. Does anyone know if they are also going to be available as flat kits?


I am interested as the L&N had a group of stockcars that with the exception of the width of a couple of boards and slightly different flat strap braces on the end panels are very close. Even the doors are identical. From my one photo it appears that the L&N cars had an outside metal roof that would be very easy. Not sure about the ends but if it different the the K8 it would be easier w/flat kit.


For ACL (blt. 1941) and C&O  (blt. 1937) fans, each had Dreadnaught ends, 4/4 for C&O and I think the same for ACL. C&am! p;O had what looks like an outside metal roof while ACL had a Murphy paneled steel roof. Door appear identical. End panels had two short flat diagonal braces so those would require some work.


Again much easier if a flat kit version is available. Did anyone see the kits?


Bill Welch

 




Re: terra cotta roofing tiles

O Fenton Wells
 

I think you are correct I know in the south east clay building products were very local.  Tile, pipe and brick plants, albeit it very small were in almost every town.    I know early on bricks were made at the construction site.
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 3:11 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Fenton and Group,


I suspect that the cast iron pipe and concrete pipe were produced in major population areas and that terra cotta roof tiles and pipe were more of a local production product. 

How local? One of the projects that I worked on some years back was the restoration of a vaudeville theater in Newport Beach, California. The building was constructed around 1927-1928. The building had a clay tile roof and we soon discovered that the clay tiles were hand made. Actually hand formed over the leg of fellow doing the manufacture. These roof tiles may have been made right on the construction site. The existing roof tiles still showed the finger prints of the person doing the forming. Life — and construction methods — were a lot different that what we see today almost 85 years on.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA



On May 26, 2014, at 11:27 AM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Bill I wish someone would make the pipes in resin.  The dimensions of the pipe and the ends are available on line by googling cast iron pipe.  The mechanical joint appears to be the most common pipe joint in the 1950's for water and sewer plants.  If you model the south or have cars from there you would have seen lots of gons of this stuff back then.
From what I understand and I don't have any facts but the structural tile pipe and other shapes used for storm drains and foundation drains and chimney liners were carried mostly by truck.  However I am sure some went by rail.  I just don't have any documents for that
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi Ed and Group,


A number of years ago, I pulled down of a web site an image of SLSF 85954, a USRA composite gondola, loaded with what appears to be cast iron pipe of about — guessing here — 18-feet in length. There are partial images of similar cars coupled to both ends of this car also loaded with cast iron pipe. The date of the photo is given as 1958, which could be considered as a fairly late date for a USRA car to be in service. My plan is to model this car and load. 

I doubt that anyone would walk away carrying one of these lengths of pipe. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On May 25, 2014, at 1:17 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines







-- 
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...





--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: terra cotta roofing tiles

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Fenton and Group,

I suspect that the cast iron pipe and concrete pipe were produced in major population areas and that terra cotta roof tiles and pipe were more of a local production product. 

How local? One of the projects that I worked on some years back was the restoration of a vaudeville theater in Newport Beach, California. The building was constructed around 1927-1928. The building had a clay tile roof and we soon discovered that the clay tiles were hand made. Actually hand formed over the leg of fellow doing the manufacture. These roof tiles may have been made right on the construction site. The existing roof tiles still showed the finger prints of the person doing the forming. Life — and construction methods — were a lot different that what we see today almost 85 years on.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA



On May 26, 2014, at 11:27 AM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Bill I wish someone would make the pipes in resin.  The dimensions of the pipe and the ends are available on line by googling cast iron pipe.  The mechanical joint appears to be the most common pipe joint in the 1950's for water and sewer plants.  If you model the south or have cars from there you would have seen lots of gons of this stuff back then.
From what I understand and I don't have any facts but the structural tile pipe and other shapes used for storm drains and foundation drains and chimney liners were carried mostly by truck.  However I am sure some went by rail.  I just don't have any documents for that
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi Ed and Group,


A number of years ago, I pulled down of a web site an image of SLSF 85954, a USRA composite gondola, loaded with what appears to be cast iron pipe of about — guessing here — 18-feet in length. There are partial images of similar cars coupled to both ends of this car also loaded with cast iron pipe. The date of the photo is given as 1958, which could be considered as a fairly late date for a USRA car to be in service. My plan is to model this car and load. 

I doubt that anyone would walk away carrying one of these lengths of pipe. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On May 25, 2014, at 1:17 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines







-- 
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...



Re: Concrete pipe in gons

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks for sharing Tim
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 2:52 PM, O Fenton Wells <srrfan1401@...> wrote:
I saw the multi-dome tank car (wine car?) at the 8:40 mark but the gons looked like coiled wire loads to me.  I didn't stop and examine.   Loved the music
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 2:36 PM, Me vasa0vasa@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Tim O'Connor posted this youtube feature.  You need to wait until 5:20 into the film to see 5 or 6 gondolas with concrete pipe loads.

Gary Laakso
South of Mike Brock


Begin forwarded message:

From: "Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [Espee]" <Espee@...>
Date: May 26, 2014 at 1:25:19 AM EDT
To: espee@...
Subject: [Espee] SP at night in the 1940's
Reply-To: Espee@...

 


very enjoyable 9+ minute ride at night along San Fernando Blvd
in the 1940's (guessing location from signs seen along the road)
many freight cars seen, some stations too

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWOSEukNYyk

Tim O'




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...



--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: Concrete pipe in gons

O Fenton Wells
 

I saw the multi-dome tank car (wine car?) at the 8:40 mark but the gons looked like coiled wire loads to me.  I didn't stop and examine.   Loved the music
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 2:36 PM, Me vasa0vasa@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Tim O'Connor posted this youtube feature.  You need to wait until 5:20 into the film to see 5 or 6 gondolas with concrete pipe loads.

Gary Laakso
South of Mike Brock


Begin forwarded message:

From: "Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [Espee]" <Espee@...>
Date: May 26, 2014 at 1:25:19 AM EDT
To: espee@...
Subject: [Espee] SP at night in the 1940's
Reply-To: Espee@...

 


very enjoyable 9+ minute ride at night along San Fernando Blvd
in the 1940's (guessing location from signs seen along the road)
many freight cars seen, some stations too

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWOSEukNYyk

Tim O'




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: open car loads (pipe sections with flared ends)

Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

At 11:03 AM 5/26/2014, John Barry northbaylines@... [STMFC] wrote:
Thanks for the general link. The finding aid indicates several additional off line loaded freight cars and a series of photos of "Loading crane broken through dock of Pittsburg, Calif. Santa Fe R.R. crane leased for recovery." I wonder if they show the idler flat/boom car?
John

Per the link:
http://pdf.oac.cdlib.org/pdf/berkeley/bancroft/p1905_11964_cubanc.pdf
The OAC images are the tip of the iceberg. It appears that only 41 of the 247 photos are digitized...

Of specific note are un-digitized images #121 - #143... Your answer might be in:
:142 [Wharf scene, with loading crane and lumber car.]
:143 [Wharf scene, with loading crane and ship.]

There are also a large number of "Yard Scene" (lumber or railroad?) and "Wharf" photos... plus;
:62 [Pipe loaded on railway cars.]
:63 [Pipe loaded on railway cars.]
:64 [Pipe being loaded by crane.]
:65 [Pipe on railway car.]
:66 [Pipe stack.]
:67 [Pipe loaded on railway car.]

Makes one itch for a re-visit to the UC Bancroft Library!
I hope that these would be in better condition than the remnants of the Roy Graves collection.


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Re: PRR K8 stock car L&N kitbash possibilities? ACL & C&O too?

ed_mines
 

What do you use to age it (make it look more silvery)?

 

Ed Mines


Concrete pipe in gons

gary laakso
 

Tim O'Connor posted this youtube feature.  You need to wait until 5:20 into the film to see 5 or 6 gondolas with concrete pipe loads.

Gary Laakso
South of Mike Brock


Begin forwarded message:

From: "Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [Espee]" <Espee@...>
Date: May 26, 2014 at 1:25:19 AM EDT
To: espee@...
Subject: [Espee] SP at night in the 1940's
Reply-To: Espee@...

 


very enjoyable 9+ minute ride at night along San Fernando Blvd
in the 1940's (guessing location from signs seen along the road)
many freight cars seen, some stations too

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWOSEukNYyk

Tim O'


Re: terra cotta roofing tiles

O Fenton Wells
 

Bill I wish someone would make the pipes in resin.  The dimensions of the pipe and the ends are available on line by googling cast iron pipe.  The mechanical joint appears to be the most common pipe joint in the 1950's for water and sewer plants.  If you model the south or have cars from there you would have seen lots of gons of this stuff back then.
From what I understand and I don't have any facts but the structural tile pipe and other shapes used for storm drains and foundation drains and chimney liners were carried mostly by truck.  However I am sure some went by rail.  I just don't have any documents for that
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi Ed and Group,


A number of years ago, I pulled down of a web site an image of SLSF 85954, a USRA composite gondola, loaded with what appears to be cast iron pipe of about — guessing here — 18-feet in length. There are partial images of similar cars coupled to both ends of this car also loaded with cast iron pipe. The date of the photo is given as 1958, which could be considered as a fairly late date for a USRA car to be in service. My plan is to model this car and load. 

I doubt that anyone would walk away carrying one of these lengths of pipe. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On May 25, 2014, at 1:17 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines






--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: open car loads (pipe sections with flared ends)

John Barry
 

Richard,

Thanks for the general link.  The finding aid indicates several additional off line loaded freight cars and a series of photos of "Loading crane broken through dock of Pittsburg, Calif. Santa Fe R.R. crane leased for recovery."  I wonder if they show the idler flat/boom car?  

 
John Barry


ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights


707-490-9696


3450 Palmer Drive, Suite 4224
Cameron Park, CA 95682


From: "Richard Brennan brennan8@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, May 26, 2014 10:12 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] open car loads (pipe sections with flared ends)

 
Redwood, with its natural resistance to deterioration, was often used
for underground pipe in the Far West.

An comprehensive set of photos from the Redwood Manufacturers Company
Plant in Pittsburg, Calif is on-line at the California Digital Library...
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/view?docId=tf7v19p57x;developer=local;style=oac4;doc.view=items

including AT&SF FT-G #93264 with a quite full flared-end pipe load:
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/redwood/figures/I0026212A.jpg

Loaded PRR GRa #337448 and AT&SF Box #9281 with straight
wire-wrapped sections appear in:
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/redwood/figures/I0026209A.jpg

I have seen Sanborn map notations where underground redwood pipe was used;
and Bay Area construction projects are STILL digging this stuff up...
~100 years after it was placed!

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------




Re: open car loads (pipe sections with flared ends)

John Barry
 

Richard,

9281 is a DS Auto car with four fishbelly underframe sections.  The photo dates from prior to conversion to all steel in the mid to late 30s.  Nice in service shot.
 
John Barry


ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights


707-490-9696


3450 Palmer Drive, Suite 4224
Cameron Park, CA 95682


From: "Richard Brennan brennan8@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, May 26, 2014 10:12 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] open car loads (pipe sections with flared ends)

 
Redwood, with its natural resistance to deterioration, was often used
for underground pipe in the Far West.

An comprehensive set of photos from the Redwood Manufacturers Company
Plant in Pittsburg, Calif is on-line at the California Digital Library...
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/view?docId=tf7v19p57x;developer=local;style=oac4;doc.view=items

including AT&SF FT-G #93264 with a quite full flared-end pipe load:
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/redwood/figures/I0026212A.jpg

Loaded PRR GRa #337448 and AT&SF Box #9281 with straight
wire-wrapped sections appear in:
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/redwood/figures/I0026209A.jpg

I have seen Sanborn map notations where underground redwood pipe was used;
and Bay Area construction projects are STILL digging this stuff up...
~100 years after it was placed!

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------




Re: open car loads (pipe sections with flared ends)

Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

Redwood, with its natural resistance to deterioration, was often used for underground pipe in the Far West.

An comprehensive set of photos from the Redwood Manufacturers Company Plant in Pittsburg, Calif is on-line at the California Digital Library...
http://www.oac.cdlib.org/view?docId=tf7v19p57x;developer=local;style=oac4;doc.view=items

including AT&SF FT-G #93264 with a quite full flared-end pipe load:
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/redwood/figures/I0026212A.jpg

Loaded PRR GRa #337448 and AT&SF Box #9281 with straight wire-wrapped sections appear in:
http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/FindingAids/dynaweb/calher/redwood/figures/I0026209A.jpg

I have seen Sanborn map notations where underground redwood pipe was used;
and Bay Area construction projects are STILL digging this stuff up... ~100 years after it was placed!


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Re: Sunshine Response to Request for Replacement of Wrong Parts in Th...

Jerry Hamsmith
 

Nelson -

For information about HO scale resin CB&Q GS-8s currently in development, please contact me off list at hammersr at aol.com

Jerry Hamsmith


Re: terra cotta roofing tiles

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Hi Ed and Group,

A number of years ago, I pulled down of a web site an image of SLSF 85954, a USRA composite gondola, loaded with what appears to be cast iron pipe of about — guessing here — 18-feet in length. There are partial images of similar cars coupled to both ends of this car also loaded with cast iron pipe. The date of the photo is given as 1958, which could be considered as a fairly late date for a USRA car to be in service. My plan is to model this car and load. 

I doubt that anyone would walk away carrying one of these lengths of pipe. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On May 25, 2014, at 1:17 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines




Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?

A&Y Dave in MD
 

You could even apply a rank order correlation test to the actual and observed values to show that they match statistically, although the evidence was fairly clear. I'll have to go through your other posts. Interesting stuff!

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On May 26, 2014, at 3:34 AM, "Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Larry Castle wrote:

 
Several years ago I scanned and posted a number of conductors train lists and put them in the photos section. Below is one example but it appears Yahoo changed the size making the images useless or I am not viewing them correctly. I can replace them if I know the requirements. 
 
I scanned each page and put them in the photo section at: Now screwed up by Yahoo

         A couple of years ago, when Larry had first posted these time book pages, I went through them and collected various information I could use in my own modeling of the SP Coast Line. I reported on the highlights of my findings in a series of blog posts. One, with a link to an earlier one, is at this link:


I hope this illustrates one kind of use that can be made of these sorts of data.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?

Tony Thompson
 

Larry Castle wrote:

 
Several years ago I scanned and posted a number of conductors train lists and put them in the photos section. Below is one example but it appears Yahoo changed the size making the images useless or I am not viewing them correctly. I can replace them if I know the requirements. 
 
I scanned each page and put them in the photo section at: Now screwed up by Yahoo

         A couple of years ago, when Larry had first posted these time book pages, I went through them and collected various information I could use in my own modeling of the SP Coast Line. I reported on the highlights of my findings in a series of blog posts. One, with a link to an earlier one, is at this link:


I hope this illustrates one kind of use that can be made of these sorts of data.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?

Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

Larry

Sample pages from the three albums downloaded for me at a fairly readable 700 by 800 pixels (average)...
Were they originally larger?

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

At 02:37 PM 5/25/2014, sp1930s@q.com [STMFC] wrote:
Several years ago I scanned and posted a number of conductors train lists and put them in the photos section. Below is one example but it appears Yahoo changed the size making the images useless or I am not viewing them correctly. I can replace them if I know the requirements.
scanned each page and put them in the photo section at: Now screwed up by Yahoo
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/650677275/pic/list>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/650677275/pic/list


Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Larry,

I was able to access and read your uploads just fine.  I had to zoom in and out (on my computer if I hold down the CTRL key and then roll the wheel on my mouse, I can zoom in and out).  Thank you for calling attention to them! 

Dave


At 05:37 PM 5/25/2014, you wrote:
Dear list
 
Several years ago I scanned and posted a number of conductors train lists and put them in the photos section. Below is one example but it appears Yahoo changed the size making the images useless or I am not viewing them correctly. I can replace them if I know the requirements.
 
I scanned each page and put them in the photo section at: Now screwed up by Yahoo
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/650677275/pic/list
 
Larry Castle

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