Date   

Re: Did I Ruin It?

al_brown03
 

I haven't used alcohol and India ink, but I've definitely experienced whitening from spraying Dullcote on a humid day. In my hands, sometimes an additional coat of Dullcote removes the whitening, sometimes it doesn't; what works for me pretty consistently is to overspray with Glosscote (which removes the whitening) *then* Dullcote (making sure the humidity's gone down).

 

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Did I Ruin It?

Cyril Durrenberger
 

I would try another coat of dullcoat, but do it on a day with low humidity. I have had the same problem with washes thinned with alcohol.

Cyril Durrenberger
--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 5/27/14, 'Rossiter, Mark W' Mark.Rossiter@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Subject: [STMFC] Did I Ruin It?
To: "stmfc@..." <stmfc@...>
Date: Tuesday, May 27, 2014, 6:41 AM
















 













Group: I recently applied
an alcohol/India Ink wash to  an oxide red colored
single sheathed box car that I now suspect had been sprayed
with Dullcoat at some point.  The results looked
promising until the model was completely dry.  The
car is now almost completely white.  It looks like
something out of a ghost fleet.  Is there any way to
recover from this?  No amount of additional weathering
will make it took even remotely realistic. 

 
Mark Rossiter


Re: Did I Ruin It?

Charlie Duckworth
 

Mark
I've been able to get rid of the Dullcote chalky whiteness by airbrushing a light coat of Tamiya's acrylic clear over it.  

Charlie Duckworth


Re: Did I Ruin It?

Dennis Williams
 

I had some luck on high gloss clear. I put 2 or 3 light coats. Sometimes it would clear up. Dennis Williams


------------------------------

On Tue, May 27, 2014 7:11 AM PDT Paul Doggett paul.doggett2472@... [STMFC] wrote:

if you give it a light spray with testors thinners you may be able to restore it to a lightly weathered condition. l had a similar problem but not with dullcoat but with humbrol/revel Matt varnish 
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile"'Rossiter, Mark W' Mark.Rossiter@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:Group: I recently applied an alcohol/India Ink wash to  an oxide red colored single sheathed box car that I now suspect had been sprayed with Dullcoat at some point.  The results looked promising until the model was completely dry.  The car is now almost completely white.  It looks like something out of a ghost fleet.  Is there any way to recover from this?  No amount of additional weathering will make it took even remotely realistic. 

 

Mark Rossiter  

 


Re: Did I Ruin It?

Pierre Oliver
 

Damn spell correct
Respray with Dullcote

Pierre Oliver


On May 27, 2014, at 10:08 AM, "Pierre Oliver pierre.oliver@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Respiratory with Dullcote

Pierre Oliver


On May 27, 2014, at 9:41 AM, "'Rossiter, Mark W' Mark.Rossiter@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Group: I recently applied an alcohol/India Ink wash to  an oxide red colored single sheathed box car that I now suspect had been sprayed with Dullcoat at some point.  The results looked promising until the model was completely dry.  The car is now almost completely white.  It looks like something out of a ghost fleet.  Is there any way to recover from this?  No amount of additional weathering will make it took even remotely realistic. 

 

Mark Rossiter  

 


Re: Did I Ruin It?

Paul Doggett <paul.doggett2472@...>
 

if you give it a light spray with testors thinners you may be able to restore it to a lightly weathered condition. l had a similar problem but not with dullcoat but with humbrol/revel Matt varnish 
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile

"'Rossiter, Mark W' Mark.Rossiter@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Group: I recently applied an alcohol/India Ink wash to  an oxide red colored single sheathed box car that I now suspect had been sprayed with Dullcoat at some point.  The results looked promising until the model was completely dry.  The car is now almost completely white.  It looks like something out of a ghost fleet.  Is there any way to recover from this?  No amount of additional weathering will make it took even remotely realistic. 

 

Mark Rossiter  

 


Re: Did I Ruin It?

Pierre Oliver
 

Respiratory with Dullcote

Pierre Oliver


On May 27, 2014, at 9:41 AM, "'Rossiter, Mark W' Mark.Rossiter@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Group: I recently applied an alcohol/India Ink wash to  an oxide red colored single sheathed box car that I now suspect had been sprayed with Dullcoat at some point.  The results looked promising until the model was completely dry.  The car is now almost completely white.  It looks like something out of a ghost fleet.  Is there any way to recover from this?  No amount of additional weathering will make it took even remotely realistic. 

 

Mark Rossiter  

 


Re: Did I Ruin It?

Andy Miller
 

I am glad to say that I have never had exactly this experience, so my
suggestions are mostly conjecture. I have had cases where Dullcote turns
white when it dries on a model. I have always suspected that it has
something to do with the humidity, but I would be happy to have someone with
real knowledge of this awful experience to chime in. In your case I suspect
the alcohol produced this effect.



The only solution I have ever found is to put several more layers of
Dullcote on the model. It will dissolve the haze, and if things go well the
haze will not entirely return.



The good news-bad news is that according to my LHS Rustoleum/Testors is
sending Dullcote the way of Floquil, Pactra, Testors and all the other
brands we had relied on. They seem to believe that anything a model
railroader needs can be bought in a large size spray can of Rustoleum L So
we won't have this probem much longer.



Regards,



Andy Miller



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 9:42 AM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: [STMFC] Did I Ruin It?





Group: I recently applied an alcohol/India Ink wash to an oxide red colored
single sheathed box car that I now suspect had been sprayed with Dullcoat at
some point. The results looked promising until the model was completely
dry. The car is now almost completely white. It looks like something out
of a ghost fleet. Is there any way to recover from this? No amount of
additional weathering will make it took even remotely realistic.



Mark Rossiter


Re: Did I Ruin It? (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Mark;

I had a couple cars that I did the same thing to, and I mostly rescued them (there is still a bit of white ghosting that is not that objectionable; it looks like they were carrying a limestone load or something) by overspraying them with a matte clearcoat. I hate to have you try something that won't turn out right for you, but I was also pretty desperate.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 9:42 AM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [STMFC] Did I Ruin It?



Group: I recently applied an alcohol/India Ink wash to an oxide red colored single sheathed box car that I now suspect had been sprayed with Dullcoat at some point. The results looked promising until the model was completely dry. The car is now almost completely white. It looks like something out of a ghost fleet. Is there any way to recover from this? No amount of additional weathering will make it took even remotely realistic.



Mark Rossiter





Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Wheelset and coupler choices. (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Stuart;

The only ones I have actually seen applied to HO scale freight cars were those on a switching layout built by John Wright from England, which he referred to as "finescale" wheelsets. They were scale width and flange depth. They were made in Britain, but I do not remember who made them.

They were incredibly finicky, and I don't believe most folks could stand the amount of work necessary to build trackwork that would allow them to stay on the rails in normal operation. It was all he could do to keep cars on the rails during simple backing maneuvers with only 3 or 4 cars. I can only imagine what the result would be pushing a string of a dozen cars into a siding.

My own experience with "Code 88" wheelsets had similar results, especially when making pushing maneuvers through turnouts, and the worst being crossovers. I had thought I had "tuned" my turnouts pretty well up until that time. Many turnouts required "shimming" that reduced it somewhat, but not completely. I believe (in my case) it comes from the frogs not being "tight" enough (the point not extending far enough into the flangeway) to prevent the wheels from momentarily dropping into the gap, thus creating a condition for derailing the wheel. I have not converted those cars back, as yet, but I do not trust them completely in operation.

I admire those that have made this all work for them, but I am not that patient.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 9:02 AM
To: Steam Era Freight Cars LIST
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [STMFC] Wheelset and coupler choices.



Does any manufacturer make TRUE Code 88 wheels, i.e., wheels with flanges that have Code 88 profiles instead of Code 110 profiles?

Stuart A. Forsyth
forsyth@...



On May 18, 2014, at 6:19 PM, 'Mike Brock' brockm@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


One of the problems with the term "Code 88" is that it has been adopted [ it
seems ] by the modeling community as a wheel with an NMRA defined Code 110
flange as part of a wheel with a total width of .088 inches. The result [ at
least with some such wheels ] is a wheel that is NOT a true NMRA Code 88
wheel.




Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Did I Ruin It?

Rossiter, Mark W <Mark.Rossiter@...>
 

Group: I recently applied an alcohol/India Ink wash to  an oxide red colored single sheathed box car that I now suspect had been sprayed with Dullcoat at some point.  The results looked promising until the model was completely dry.  The car is now almost completely white.  It looks like something out of a ghost fleet.  Is there any way to recover from this?  No amount of additional weathering will make it took even remotely realistic. 

 

Mark Rossiter  

 


Re: Wheelset and coupler choices.

Stuart Forsyth <trainmail@...>
 

Does any manufacturer make TRUE Code 88 wheels, i.e., wheels with flanges that have Code 88 profiles instead of Code 110 profiles?

Stuart A. Forsyth


On May 18, 2014, at 6:19 PM, 'Mike Brock' brockm@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

One of the problems with the term "Code 88" is that it has been adopted [ it 
seems ] by the modeling community as a wheel with an NMRA defined Code 110 
flange as part of a wheel with a total width of .088 inches. The result [ at 
least with some such wheels ] is a wheel that is NOT a true NMRA Code 88 
wheel.


Re: Daily carload reports by station Re: Re: Are conductor's li

Clark Propst
 

They have a stack of these at the Randolph Minn. museum from the Milwaukee station in Northfield from about 63 (I Think). Of interest were two CGW stock cars loaded with grain. They were there on different days.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Daily carload reports by station Re: Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?

Robert kirkham
 

I have half a dozen or so sheets for the CPR in the late 1920s – all small prairie towns.  The clean back sides were used (as scrap paper) for a carbon copy of a lengthy report and so in no obvious order.  Nonetheless for the little they report, they fascinate me.  And ever since I tend to look at the back side of old letters.  
 
Also, the Chan collection at UBC has a very large book recording cars in Vancouver – about 11 or 12 years into the future for this list.
 
 
Rob Kirkham 
 

Sent: Monday, May 26, 2014 3:21 PM
Subject: Daily carload reports by station Re: [STMFC] Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?
 


Another interesting source of data, though probably not as good as conductor train lists for some types of analysis, are daily carload reports from stations.

The link below is a photo of one of these reports, the top of a packet for the whole month.  It includes car numbers, reporting marks, destination, commodity, shipper, consignee, and routing information.
http://www.milwelectric.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Carload-shipments-forwarded-from-Elbe-1930-12-31.jpg

 

Cascade Rail Foundation has boxes of these reports for Milwaukee Road stations in Washington, mostly for stations south of Tacoma but also some for stations south and east of Seattle into central Washington.  Seattle and points west or north must have been stored in Seattle because we don't have any (these came from the Tacoma office).  The time range for these documents is mainly the late 1920s to the late 1930s.  In some cases, there are complete years for stations.

 

If anyone in the Seattle area would like to help organize and digitize these documents, please contact me at kruegerp@... (kruegerp [at] nwlink [dot] com).  Cascade Rail Foundation is a member organization of Pacific Northwest Railroad Archive in Burien, WA and the materials are located there.

 

I'm sure other railroads had this kind of report.  Anyone know of any that have survived?

 

Thanks,
Paul

 

Paul Krueger

Secretary

Cascade Rail Foundation

http://www.milwelectric.org

"Remembering the Milwaukee Road in Washington"


Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?

sp1930s
 

Dear list,
 
Since these seem to work for others here are the links to all three books I put in the photos section several years ago. Two of the books were loaned to me by Tom Dill to share and one was purchased from Jack Bowden.
 
Larry Castle 
 
 
Location is on the S.P.'s Modoc Line mostly between Alturas and Wendel during
1936 and 1937. This is the line connecting S.P.'s Oregon operations to the
Overland route at Fernley Nevada.
 
Location is on the S.P.'s Modoc Line mostly between Alturas and Wendel during 1938 and 1939.
This is the line connecting S.P.'s Oregon operations to the Overland route at Fernley Nevada.
 
 
This one covers periods of time spread from 1948 to 1952 on the SP's Coast Line Division,
 mostly locals South of San Francisco in the Salinas to Watsonville Junction area.
It is in the photos section at:
 


Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?

sp1930s
 

Richard,

 

They are about 800 x 900 and should be printable.

 

I am relieved that others can see them at the correct size. When I select them about 1 inch is cropped from each side and a lesser amount from the top and bottom. I can zoom in and out. It has to be something I am doing on my end.

 

Larry


Daily carload reports by station Re: Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?

kruegerp@...
 

Another interesting source of data, though probably not as good as conductor train lists for some types of analysis, are daily carload reports from stations.

The link below is a photo of one of these reports, the top of a packet for the whole month.  It includes car numbers, reporting marks, destination, commodity, shipper, consignee, and routing information.
http://www.milwelectric.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Carload-shipments-forwarded-from-Elbe-1930-12-31.jpg

 

Cascade Rail Foundation has boxes of these reports for Milwaukee Road stations in Washington, mostly for stations south of Tacoma but also some for stations south and east of Seattle into central Washington.  Seattle and points west or north must have been stored in Seattle because we don't have any (these came from the Tacoma office).  The time range for these documents is mainly the late 1920s to the late 1930s.  In some cases, there are complete years for stations.


If anyone in the Seattle area would like to help organize and digitize these documents, please contact me at kruegerp@... (kruegerp [at] nwlink [dot] com).  Cascade Rail Foundation is a member organization of Pacific Northwest Railroad Archive in Burien, WA and the materials are located there.


I'm sure other railroads had this kind of report.  Anyone know of any that have survived?


Thanks,
Paul


Paul Krueger

Secretary

Cascade Rail Foundation

http://www.milwelectric.org

"Remembering the Milwaukee Road in Washington"


Re: terra cotta roofing tiles

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Winfield, IA was once home to the Merillat Road Construction Co., a large producer of culverts of various types that distributed throughout Iowa and probably in Western Illinois and Northeastern Missouri. L. B. Pierce Brick and Tile Factory and E. C. Smith Sash and Door Factory were also located there. Winfield was and still is a small town in East Central Iowa. It was served by the CB&Q and the M&StL, so rail shipments are probable, given the state of rural roads in the 1920-30s. I have photos of all of these industries, but I don’t know who, if anyone, retains the rights, so I can’t post them to the photo section at this time. That’s a shame, because they’re too good not to be distributed to a group that would fully appreciate them. I photographed the photographs and copies of photographs at the Winfield Historical Society a couple of years ago. I’ll inquire about posting them.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

 

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent:
Monday, May 26, 2014 2:20 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] terra cotta roofing tiles

 

 

I think you are correct I know in the south east clay building products were very local.  Tile, pipe and brick plants, albeit it very small were in almost every town.    I know early on bricks were made at the construction site.

Fenton Wells

 

On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 3:11 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Fenton and Group,

 

I suspect that the cast iron pipe and concrete pipe were produced in major population areas and that terra cotta roof tiles and pipe were more of a local production product. 

 

How local? One of the projects that I worked on some years back was the restoration of a vaudeville theater in Newport Beach, California. The building was constructed around 1927-1928. The building had a clay tile roof and we soon discovered that the clay tiles were hand made. Actually hand formed over the leg of fellow doing the manufacture. These roof tiles may have been made right on the construction site. The existing roof tiles still showed the finger prints of the person doing the forming. Life — and construction methods — were a lot different that what we see today almost 85 years on.

 

Cheers,

Bill Keene

Irvine, CA

 

 

 

On May 26, 2014, at 11:27 AM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



 

Bill I wish someone would make the pipes in resin.  The dimensions of the pipe and the ends are available on line by googling cast iron pipe.  The mechanical joint appears to be the most common pipe joint in the 1950's for water and sewer plants.  If you model the south or have cars from there you would have seen lots of gons of this stuff back then.

From what I understand and I don't have any facts but the structural tile pipe and other shapes used for storm drains and foundation drains and chimney liners were carried mostly by truck.  However I am sure some went by rail.  I just don't have any documents for that

Fenton Wells

 

On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Hi Ed and Group,

 

A number of years ago, I pulled down of a web site an image of SLSF 85954, a USRA composite gondola, loaded with what appears to be cast iron pipe of about — guessing here — 18-feet in length. There are partial images of similar cars coupled to both ends of this car also loaded with cast iron pipe. The date of the photo is given as 1958, which could be considered as a fairly late date for a USRA car to be in service. My plan is to model this car and load. 

 

I doubt that anyone would walk away carrying one of these lengths of pipe. 

 

Cheers,

Bill Keene

Irvine, CA

 

 

On May 25, 2014, at 1:17 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



 

 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines

 

 

 



 

-- 
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane

Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...

 

 



 

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane

Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...

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Re: PRR K8 stock car L&N kitbash possibilities? ACL & C&O too?

Bruce Smith
 

Bill,

I believe Steve will be making some of these available as flat kits in the near future, IIRC.

regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, May 25, 2014 2:18 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] PRR K8 stock car L&N kitbash possibilities? ACL & C&O too?



Recently someone noted that F&C had introduced a one-piece body model of the Penny's K8 stockcar. This car featured a Pratt Truss frame with Hat Section vertical and diagonal steel braces. There are no details about this kit on F&C's website as yet. Does anyone know if they are also going to be available as flat kits?


I am interested as the L&N had a group of stockcars that with the exception of the width of a couple of boards and slightly different flat strap braces on the end panels are very close. Even the doors are identical. From my one photo it appears that the L&N cars had an outside metal roof that would be very easy. Not sure about the ends but if it different the the K8 it would be easier w/flat kit.


For ACL (blt. 1941) and C&O  (blt. 1937) fans, each had Dreadnaught ends, 4/4 for C&O and I think the same for ACL. C&am! p;O had what looks like an outside metal roof while ACL had a Murphy paneled steel roof. Door appear identical. End panels had two short flat diagonal braces so those would require some work.


Again much easier if a flat kit version is available. Did anyone see the kits?


Bill Welch

 




Re: terra cotta roofing tiles

O Fenton Wells
 

I think you are correct I know in the south east clay building products were very local.  Tile, pipe and brick plants, albeit it very small were in almost every town.    I know early on bricks were made at the construction site.
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 3:11 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Fenton and Group,


I suspect that the cast iron pipe and concrete pipe were produced in major population areas and that terra cotta roof tiles and pipe were more of a local production product. 

How local? One of the projects that I worked on some years back was the restoration of a vaudeville theater in Newport Beach, California. The building was constructed around 1927-1928. The building had a clay tile roof and we soon discovered that the clay tiles were hand made. Actually hand formed over the leg of fellow doing the manufacture. These roof tiles may have been made right on the construction site. The existing roof tiles still showed the finger prints of the person doing the forming. Life — and construction methods — were a lot different that what we see today almost 85 years on.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA



On May 26, 2014, at 11:27 AM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Bill I wish someone would make the pipes in resin.  The dimensions of the pipe and the ends are available on line by googling cast iron pipe.  The mechanical joint appears to be the most common pipe joint in the 1950's for water and sewer plants.  If you model the south or have cars from there you would have seen lots of gons of this stuff back then.
From what I understand and I don't have any facts but the structural tile pipe and other shapes used for storm drains and foundation drains and chimney liners were carried mostly by truck.  However I am sure some went by rail.  I just don't have any documents for that
Fenton Wells


On Mon, May 26, 2014 at 12:42 PM, William Keene wakeene@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi Ed and Group,


A number of years ago, I pulled down of a web site an image of SLSF 85954, a USRA composite gondola, loaded with what appears to be cast iron pipe of about — guessing here — 18-feet in length. There are partial images of similar cars coupled to both ends of this car also loaded with cast iron pipe. The date of the photo is given as 1958, which could be considered as a fairly late date for a USRA car to be in service. My plan is to model this car and load. 

I doubt that anyone would walk away carrying one of these lengths of pipe. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On May 25, 2014, at 1:17 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


 Henry Maywald told me he saw a Rio Grande stock car loaded with terra cotta tiles here on Long Island in the '50s.

 

I don't think anything of value that could be carried away would be shipped in open top cars.

 

Ed Mines







-- 
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...





--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...

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