Date   

Re: Sunshine CB&Q XM-25/XM-26

Robert Heninger
 

Gary,
      I have not done the conversion. However, the XM-21/22 cars had Murphy XLA roofs, and single sheathed ends, whereas the XM-25/26 had Hutchins roofs and corrugated ends. Here is a photo of a XM-21/22 car:


      Westerfield makes a beautiful kit of the XM-21/22/23 series of cars. Personally, I would Ebay the Sunshine kits, and buy the Westerfield versions. YMMV.

Regards,
Bob Heninger
Minot, ND


Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Bruce Smith
 

Schuyler,

That's why I never leave models in a parked car around here !  

The reality is that home oven controllers are notoriously inaccurate and especially in the lower ranges.  If you do bake, make sure all meltable parts are off the model and use an accurate thermometer to check the temperature of your oven, or use a specially built oven with an accurate thermostat in the desired range.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 9:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass



Baking at 150-160 degrees . . . that can easily be the temperature of your models in the trunk or especially in the back seat of your car.  So unless you have a fully temperature-controlled environment at all times and don’t take your model anywhere . . .

 

But knowing where you live, Bruce, you MAY have a temperature-controlled environment.  At least, I >hope< you have  AC!

 

Baking is what sets Scalecoat I hard, nearly impossible to scratch.

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 10:02 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

 

Paul,

 

Skip the model "primer" because most of them are just plain paint. For dark colors, I paint with a Model Master flat black spray bomb and then with whatever I want to over that. For colors that I don't want a black layer under, I simply apply Scalecoat 1.  I don't bake - there is no need and too much risk for my taste. 

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

!

 


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 5:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

I have a! n unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere "super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

 




Re: Did I Ruin It?

richard haave
 

Here is something from he Diesel Detailer group about dullcoat that may be of interest:


  http://dieseldetailer.proboards.com/thread/14302/when-dullcoat-goes-bad


Dick Haave


Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Mikebrock
 

Schuyler Larrabee writes:

"How many members are there on this list? That's about how many methods
there are, I suspect."

Pretty close I'd say. And, to add to the list:

After following Schuyler's cleaning technique, I place a brass shell [ car or locomitive ] into a solution of photo tray cleaner [ using a rectangular glass baking dish. For about 10 seconds. Then, into a pail of water it goes. Really cleans any corrosion. After a few minutes in the water I make absolutely certain every thing is dry [ using a hair dryer blower ] I paint. With [ now ] Polyscale. Baking? You're kidding. Why?

Unfortunately it's getting to be difficult to find tray cleaner solution.

Mike Brock


Re: [EXTERNAL] Wheelset and coupler choices. (UNCLASSIFIED)

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

In a prominent location on my layout, I have parked a nicely weathered and detailed Accurail 3-bay hopper with Sergent couplers, and NWSL full scale wheels. The combination looks great, -especially on its code 55 track- and one can easily pine away for the opportunity to apply these fine scale details on ALL the equipment. 

However, it does its job just fine in its stationary role as furniture, inasmuch as,  as good as it looks,  it can barely stay on the track when straight, much less when curved, and not at all through any NMRA turnout.

I subscribe to Andy Sperandeo's view in favor of 0.088" wheels, that is to not be too fussy about whether or not the flanges are thick or thin, etc. as long as they can roll  reliably through your NMRA trackwork.  I find that such wheels from Reboxx, INternountain, Branchline, and Kadee all do their jobs in this regard, as do the NWSL code 88 wheels.

Denny
 
Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA






Painting HO Brass

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Another thought about this topic.

 

I have, more than once, managed to put a fingerprint or some other ding in a brand new paint job on a brass model.  The worst one was right on the nose of an F unit (a PRE-1960 F UNIT!!).

 

Suitable expletives followed.

 

But I managed to save it.  I very carefully and gently used 800 grit wet-and-dry sandpaper, wet, and was able to sand out the fingerprint, feathering out the paint so it was all smooth.  Waited for it to dry, and repainted.  It WAS all one color (at that point, anyway) and no one has ever noticed anything odd about the finished product.  Including the guy who paid me for that model.

 

Schuyler


Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Baking at 150-160 degrees . . . that can easily be the temperature of your models in the trunk or especially in the back seat of your car.  So unless you have a fully temperature-controlled environment at all times and don’t take your model anywhere . . .

 

But knowing where you live, Bruce, you MAY have a temperature-controlled environment.  At least, I >hope< you have  AC!

 

Baking is what sets Scalecoat I hard, nearly impossible to scratch.

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 10:02 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

 

Paul,

 

Skip the model "primer" because most of them are just plain paint. For dark colors, I paint with a Model Master flat black spray bomb and then with whatever I want to over that. For colors that I don't want a black layer under, I simply apply Scalecoat 1.  I don't bake - there is no need and too much risk for my taste. 

 

Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

 


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 5:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere "super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

 


Re: Looking for CNJ Liberty Herald Decals for USRA box

Benjamin Hom
 

Ken Roth asked:
"I have a single-sheath USRA boxcar I'm hoping to detail for circa 1950 per picture in RPC volume 17 for the Central Railroad of NJ.  I have Westerfield decals which cover original scheme, but I'm stumped on where to find a white CNJ Liberty Herald of proper dimensions.  Any help would be appreciated in locating a source."
Try C-D-S HO-119 or HO-120.  Both are hopper car sets, but the small herald might be what you need to fit between the truss members.

Ben Hom


Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Paul Hillman
 

Googled the following for all list chemists:
 
 Vinegar consists of acetic acid (CH3COOH), water and trace amounts of other chemicals, which may include flavorings. The concentration of the acetic acid is variable. Distilled vinegar contains 5-8% acetic acid. Spirit of vinegar is a stronger form of vinegar that contains 5-20% acetic acid.
 
"Table salt - ( 'Morton's Salt' ) " = sodium chloride = NaCl
 
Hydrochloric acid = HCl
 
So,.........mixing NaCl + CH3COOH = HCl ( ? )
 
Paul Hillman
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 8:42 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

I may amuse (or exasperate) the chemists on the list, but IIRC, vinegar and salt make weak hydrochloric acid.  I don't know as it >replaces< grit blasting, as that can reduce or eliminate some surface imperfections (solder buildup, epoxy smears, things like that, I think) but once the model is physically what you want it to be, it really does CLEAN the surface.

You might want to take into account that I do not own a grit blasting setup.  And since I don't own one or have ready access to one . . .

I use distilled white vinegar (not derived from foods) and yup, plain ol' Morton's.  I keep it back in the glass bottle, appropriately marked and stored with my paint stuff, with some plastic wrap under that steel cap.  I probably should buy a new bottle with a plastic cap!  Same bottle's done  . . . I dunno, 15-18 models?  A lot.  Lasts quite a while.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 9:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

Schuyler, thanks for the response. Found it new & interesting about etching with vinegar & salt. What kind of vinegar? (Type of salt = sodium chloride / "table salt"?)

Sounds like this replaces having to sand-blast.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----

To: STMFC@...

Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:48 PM

Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

How many members are there on this list? That's about how many methods
there are, I suspect.

But, for me, once I'm sure there's no clearcoat on the model and I'm really
dealing with brass as my surface to paint . . .

I wash it vigorously, soap and water, then rinse until I'm really bored with
that, hot water will get any soap off. Then etch the surface in vinegar
with salt added to a saturated solution. Doesn't take long, maybe 15-20
minutes. Rubber gloves from here on.

I prime it with Scalecoat 1, first, and bake it per the directions. Maybe
140-150 degrees for a half hour plus. This will give you a rock-hard glossy
surface. Then the finish coat, or coats as the case may be, and bake those
too.

For masking, I use Scotch 3M 218 Fine Line tape, cut to fit around any
protuberances. Cover any gaps in the taping with rubber cement, or
MicroScale's Micro-.Mask There's been a ton printed about how to remove the
tape, pulling it back so it's coming off the model at a 178 degree angle (as
near to 180 as you can manage) so you're minimizing the perpendicular pull
on the paint.

Decal.

Flat coat.*

Weather.

Done.

*There's been a bit of whining about the demise of Dullcoat. Not from me.
I say "Finally." I have for years used a flat photo lacquer, which is DEAD
flat. If you remember Kar-Line models, which came with paint approximating
the finish on your new car, photo flat lacquer would turn Kar-Line cars into
presentable, weatherable layout scenery in one coat. They were usually
Athearn Blue Box models, hence "scenery" models. I bought a gallon of
McDonald's Photo Flat Lacquer around 1985. Thinned to a ratio of about 5:1
thinner/lacquer, it sprays very nicely and really works far better than
Dullcoat. And I still have a LOT left.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting
around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the
best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's
always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of
parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere
"super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Shipping Steel Pipe by Rail

Walter Cox
 

Hi Jim,
Your post sent  me to my copy of Trackside Grand Trunk New England Lines a Morning Sun book, where I thought I  had seen a pic of a pipe load. I found the pic but the load was 30 carloads of  rusty steel pipes (no belled ends) but still a good looking load. The pipes look to be about 10 inches in diameter and three and a half pipes are visible above the side sill.  The load was being taken to the siding at Bates Me. before being moved to the Portland Pipe Company in Bethel for unloading. This suggests that it could be a fairly common move. The date of the pic was June 9, 1965 so it would seem to be a reasonably safe bet that similar moves took place  in our era.
Walt
 
 

In a message dated 5/27/2014 11:41:17 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

Hi,

I got to thinking about this. To the best of my
knowledge I've never seen a prototype pic of
concrete pipe being shipped by rail. (Caveat -
although I am a 'student of pics of STMFC era
topics' ... I am considerably more likely to
study pics of railroading in the West than for
other parts of the country.)

Concrete manufacturing facilities are relatively
small and distributed. I would also expect that
producing molds for concrete pipe (to be used
at a mfgr site) is relatively easy/simple.
Concrete pipe would be a relatively light load
(lots of air) for a freight car. The individual pipe
sections are heavy ... but the number of them
you can put in a car is 'limited'. And the number
of pipe segments in an individual car would be
fairly few. So if we were to see pipe shipped
by rail I would expect several cars in a single
cut - all going to the same destination.
The distances between most concrete pipe
manufacturing facilities and the sites they would
be installed at are fairly short (RR-centric view).
Rail service to a concrete manufacturing
facilities often seems to be set up only for
deliveries of raw materials (cement in covered
hoppers, rock, sand, etc.) - if it exists at all.
Most of the concrete pipe I've ever seen has
been of the larger sizes used for storm drains
and/or sewers - as in 3 to 6 foot diameter. And
all of it that I've seen has been at installation
sites - that were served by large flat bed trucks.

Putting all of the above together my suspicion is
that it was/is 'fairly rare' for concrete pipe to be
shipped by rail.
Am I wrong?
- Jim Betz


Looking for CNJ Liberty Herald Decals for USRA box

Ken Roth
 

I have a single-sheath USRA boxcar I'm hoping to detail for circa 1950 per picture in RPC volume 17 for the Central Railroad of NJ.  I have Westerfield decals which cover original scheme, but I'm stumped on where to find a white CNJ Liberty Herald of proper dimensions.  Any help would be appreciated in locating a source.

    Thanks in advance,
    Ken Roth



Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Bruce Smith
 

Paul,

Skip the model "primer" because most of them are just plain paint. For dark colors, I paint with a Model Master flat black spray bomb and then with whatever I want to over that. For colors that I don't want a black layer under, I simply apply Scalecoat 1.  I don't bake - there is no need and too much risk for my taste. 

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 5:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass



I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere "super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman




Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I may amuse (or exasperate) the chemists on the list, but IIRC, vinegar and salt make weak hydrochloric acid.  I don’t know as it >replaces< grit blasting, as that can reduce or eliminate some surface imperfections (solder buildup, epoxy smears, things like that, I think) but once the model is physically what you want it to be, it really does CLEAN the surface.

 

You might want to take into account that I do not own a grit blasting setup.  And since I don’t own one or have ready access to one . . .

 

I use distilled white vinegar (not derived from foods) and yup, plain ol’ Morton’s.  I keep it back in the glass bottle, appropriately marked and stored with my paint stuff, with some plastic wrap under that steel cap.  I probably should buy a new bottle with a plastic cap!  Same bottle’s done  . . . I dunno, 15-18 models?  A lot.  Lasts quite a while.

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 9:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

 

Schuyler, thanks for the response. Found it new & interesting about etching with vinegar & salt. What kind of vinegar? (Type of salt = sodium chloride / "table salt"?)

 

Sounds like this replaces having to sand-blast.

 

Thanks, Paul Hillman

 

 

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:48 PM

Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

 

How many members are there on this list? That's about how many methods
there are, I suspect.

But, for me, once I'm sure there's no clearcoat on the model and I'm really
dealing with brass as my surface to paint . . .

I wash it vigorously, soap and water, then rinse until I'm really bored with
that, hot water will get any soap off. Then etch the surface in vinegar
with salt added to a saturated solution. Doesn't take long, maybe 15-20
minutes. Rubber gloves from here on.

I prime it with Scalecoat 1, first, and bake it per the directions. Maybe
140-150 degrees for a half hour plus. This will give you a rock-hard glossy
surface. Then the finish coat, or coats as the case may be, and bake those
too.

For masking, I use Scotch 3M 218 Fine Line tape, cut to fit around any
protuberances. Cover any gaps in the taping with rubber cement, or
MicroScale's Micro-.Mask There's been a ton printed about how to remove the
tape, pulling it back so it's coming off the model at a 178 degree angle (as
near to 180 as you can manage) so you're minimizing the perpendicular pull
on the paint.

Decal.

Flat coat.*

Weather.

Done.

*There's been a bit of whining about the demise of Dullcoat. Not from me.
I say "Finally." I have for years used a flat photo lacquer, which is DEAD
flat. If you remember Kar-Line models, which came with paint approximating
the finish on your new car, photo flat lacquer would turn Kar-Line cars into
presentable, weatherable layout scenery in one coat. They were usually
Athearn Blue Box models, hence "scenery" models. I bought a gallon of
McDonald's Photo Flat Lacquer around 1985. Thinned to a ratio of about 5:1
thinner/lacquer, it sprays very nicely and really works far better than
Dullcoat. And I still have a LOT left.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting
around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the
best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's
always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of
parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere
"super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Tony Thompson
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

I wash it vigorously, soap and water, then rinse until I'm really bored with that, hot water will get any soap off. Then etch the surface in vinegar with salt added to a saturated solution. Doesn't take long, maybe 15-20 minutes. Rubber gloves from here on.

     I would urge that this step be done cautiously. If the brass is one of those with a tough, adherent "brass-color" lacquer on it, no harm done. If it is bare brass, I would be careful because this mild etch can preferentially attack solder, depending on the composition of solder used in the original fabrication. So watch carefully around any visible solder joints and if anything seems to be happening there, STOP and remove and rinse thoroughly.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Paul Hillman
 

Schuyler, thanks for the response. Found it new & interesting about etching with vinegar & salt. What kind of vinegar? (Type of salt = sodium chloride / "table salt"?)
 
Sounds like this replaces having to sand-blast.
 
Thanks, Paul Hillman
 
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:48 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

How many members are there on this list? That's about how many methods
there are, I suspect.

But, for me, once I'm sure there's no clearcoat on the model and I'm really
dealing with brass as my surface to paint . . .

I wash it vigorously, soap and water, then rinse until I'm really bored with
that, hot water will get any soap off. Then etch the surface in vinegar
with salt added to a saturated solution. Doesn't take long, maybe 15-20
minutes. Rubber gloves from here on.

I prime it with Scalecoat 1, first, and bake it per the directions. Maybe
140-150 degrees for a half hour plus. This will give you a rock-hard glossy
surface. Then the finish coat, or coats as the case may be, and bake those
too.

For masking, I use Scotch 3M 218 Fine Line tape, cut to fit around any
protuberances. Cover any gaps in the taping with rubber cement, or
MicroScale's Micro-.Mask There's been a ton printed about how to remove the
tape, pulling it back so it's coming off the model at a 178 degree angle (as
near to 180 as you can manage) so you're minimizing the perpendicular pull
on the paint.

Decal.

Flat coat.*

Weather.

Done.

*There's been a bit of whining about the demise of Dullcoat. Not from me.
I say "Finally." I have for years used a flat photo lacquer, which is DEAD
flat. If you remember Kar-Line models, which came with paint approximating
the finish on your new car, photo flat lacquer would turn Kar-Line cars into
presentable, weatherable layout scenery in one coat. They were usually
Athearn Blue Box models, hence "scenery" models. I bought a gallon of
McDonald's Photo Flat Lacquer around 1985. Thinned to a ratio of about 5:1
thinner/lacquer, it sprays very nicely and really works far better than
Dullcoat. And I still have a LOT left.

Schuyler

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:25 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting
around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the
best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's
always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of
parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere
"super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Did I Ruin It?

Tim O'Connor
 

Whatever brand of paint that Athearn applies to models made in China will
blush in the presence of isopropyl alcohol. Branchline models will not blush
but the paint will wash away if you're not careful. Accurail models stand up
to a gentle alcohol wash and you can get some nice streaking effects from
the lettering.

In other words I thought this whole "blushing" business was deliberate! You
can get some really great weathering results with alcohol washes.

I haven't tried methyl alcohol directly, but I think there is some present in
so-called "denatured" ethanol. These two (isopropyl and denatured) are my
favorites for weathering washes.

Tim O'Connor

My own experience years ago is methyl alcohol (wood alcohol) would make Dullcoat blush for sure, but isopropyl would not, if used sparingly... but this was some years ago, and the formulation of Dullcoat may have changed. I don't recall if I ever successfully revered the process.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Schuyler Larrabee
 

How many members are there on this list? That's about how many methods
there are, I suspect.



But, for me, once I'm sure there's no clearcoat on the model and I'm really
dealing with brass as my surface to paint . . .

I wash it vigorously, soap and water, then rinse until I'm really bored with
that, hot water will get any soap off. Then etch the surface in vinegar
with salt added to a saturated solution. Doesn't take long, maybe 15-20
minutes. Rubber gloves from here on.



I prime it with Scalecoat 1, first, and bake it per the directions. Maybe
140-150 degrees for a half hour plus. This will give you a rock-hard glossy
surface. Then the finish coat, or coats as the case may be, and bake those
too.



For masking, I use Scotch 3M 218 Fine Line tape, cut to fit around any
protuberances. Cover any gaps in the taping with rubber cement, or
MicroScale's Micro-.Mask There's been a ton printed about how to remove the
tape, pulling it back so it's coming off the model at a 178 degree angle (as
near to 180 as you can manage) so you're minimizing the perpendicular pull
on the paint.



Decal.



Flat coat.*



Weather.



Done.





*There's been a bit of whining about the demise of Dullcoat. Not from me.
I say "Finally." I have for years used a flat photo lacquer, which is DEAD
flat. If you remember Kar-Line models, which came with paint approximating
the finish on your new car, photo flat lacquer would turn Kar-Line cars into
presentable, weatherable layout scenery in one coat. They were usually
Athearn Blue Box models, hence "scenery" models. I bought a gallon of
McDonald's Photo Flat Lacquer around 1985. Thinned to a ratio of about 5:1
thinner/lacquer, it sprays very nicely and really works far better than
Dullcoat. And I still have a LOT left.





Schuyler



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 6:25 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass





I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting
around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the
best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's
always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of
parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere
"super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman


Re: Sunshine CB&Q XM-25/XM-26

Rob Adams
 

Nelson;

Yes.  The Speedwitch version of the CB&Q XM-25/26 is dimensionally accurate.  If I recall correctly, the major dimensional discrepancy of the Sunshine kit was in the body height, not length, but before we pile on, let's keep in mind that it was a relatively early Sunshine offering and a pretty nice kit in its day.  As we know, later efforts improved significantly, as have those from other pattern builders/resin kit makers.  The Speedwitch kit for the Q XM-25/26 cars is a very nice kit and one that you'll enjoy building.

Regards,

Rob Adams


On 5/27/14, 5:39 PM, 'Nelson Moyer' ku0a@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Did Ted correct the car length problem when Speedwitch issued the XM-25/XM-26 kits? I have one packed away somewhere, so it’s not available for measuring.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 3:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine CB&Q XM-25/XM-26

 

 

Can I borrow Spanky? I'd like to find another Sunshine Models Eagle Merchandise car for the layout!

Charlie Duckworth

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Version: 2014.0.4592 / Virus Database: 3950/7572 - Release Date: 05/27/14



Re: Sunshine CB&Q XM-25/XM-26

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Did Ted correct the car length problem when Speedwitch issued the XM-25/XM-26 kits? I have one packed away somewhere, so it’s not available for measuring.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 27, 2014 3:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine CB&Q XM-25/XM-26

 

 

Can I borrow Spanky? I'd like to find another Sunshine Models Eagle Merchandise car for the layout!

Charlie Duckworth

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4592 / Virus Database: 3950/7572 - Release Date: 05/27/14


Painting HO Scale Brass

Paul Hillman
 

I have an unpainted brass car that I've had for a few years and I'm getting around to painting it.

It's been quite a while since I painted a brass car. Wondering what are the best current methods?

In the past I have baked on a primer, then sparyed the final colors. There's always problems with paint adherence to handrails and corners / edges of parts.

I've tried "Blacken-It" on brass parts but it doesn't adhere "super-strongly". Of course blasting & cleaning are first required.

Thanks, Paul Hillman

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