Date   

Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Pierre is correct. When I have baked Scalecoat 1, the resulting finish is
harder, glossier, and more resistant to scratching than any other paint I've
used. Allowing paint to dry "until the odor is gone" works OK, but it will
not give you the same durability of finish. It will scratch more easily and
wear on grabs and other wear points.



Bruce offers "polymerize." Maybe. I don't know if that's what it does or
not. But whatever it does, it works.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, June 06, 2014 2:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass





I had been lead to believe that baking paint like Scalecoat, would actually
improve the adhesion of the paint to brass.
I know from experience that baked on lacquer and enamel paint resists
scratching better.



Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com

On 6/6/2014 2:40 PM, 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC] wrote:



Matt,



Baking is only appropriate for enamel based paint. There is a school of
thought that says that it causes the paint to "cure" or polymerize, which
may well be true. Never ever bake plastic or any metal that might melt
(like some weights) and do not bake acrylic paints. Baking an enamel paint
job will allow you to move on to the next application more rapidly.



Regards

Bruce



Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/
<https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/%7Esmithbf/>



"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jun 6, 2014, at 12:36 PM, Matt Goodman goodman312@... [STMFC]
wrote:







Inexperience question here.



My understanding regarding backing is that it is intended to drive off the
volatiles in the freshly applied paint. Is this correct? Also, I believe I
read somewhere that letting a freshly painted model sit for several days (or
longer) would accomplish the same thing - only (obviously) slower...



Good thread.

Matt Goodman

Columbus, Ohio



Sent from my mobile


On May 27, 2014, at 10:02 PM, "'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]"
<STMFC@...> wrote:

Paul,



Skip the model "primer" because most of them are just plain paint. For dark
colors, I paint with a Model Master flat black spray bomb and then with
whatever I want to over that. For colors that I don't want a black layer
under, I simply apply Scalecoat 1. I don't bake - there is no need and too
much risk for my taste.



Regards

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


Re: Know what railroad this is

George Courtney
 

Well, it could Central Railroad of Louisiana, a paper company of the Jersey Central?  Tongue in cheek of course.

George Courtney


Re: Influences

proto48er
 

   My greatest influence directing me toward faithful modeling of the prototype freight car occurred when I made (3) "O" scale brass mill gons back in 1970 to plans from a model magazine.  I later learned that the side "breaks" on the plans were in the wrong place.  I started photographing and measuring prototype freight cars immediately thereafter!  I sold two of the cars, but have kept the third one in plain view at my office to remind me to keep measuring!

  The next step came when I met a co-worker in 1974 - Cyril Durrenberger.  He had worked in the same building for about 1-1/2 years before I met him - guys kept telling me that another RR nut was around!  He introduced me to ORER's and freight car diagram books. Cyril has authored a very large number of prototype-related articles in various model magazines of the time, starting with the Prototype Modeler magazines (Bob Longo).  At that time, several RR historical societies were being created also.  Cyril and I purchased a number of ORER's from Roundhouse III in New York - that really helped.

  Then Cyril and I visited the photograph collection of AC&F in St Charles, Mo. to copy freight car photos.  We spent 5 days there - I copied 3,700 freight car photos and only got to 1916 chronologically!  On the last day, we met one Ed Hawkins and his two friends, Mr. Wider and Mr. Long - it was apparently their first trip to AC&F!

A.T. Kott


Re: CNJ Box Car Red?

Rich C
 

Ken, Tru Color Paint has TCP-210 CNJ Freight Car Red 1937 through the 60's.


  Rich Christie


On Friday, June 6, 2014 2:47 PM, "ed_mines@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
How about an update on the RPC freight car color chart using the new fangled paints now available?
 
Ed Mines



Re: Know what railroad this is

william darnaby
 

This would be a good number for CIL 385 a welded side pre-PS-1 (1947) Monon
box from the series 1-500 from Pullman.



Bill Darnaby



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, June 06, 2014 3:33 PM
To: stmfc@...
Subject: [STMFC] Know what railroad this is








While going thought some Dispatcher reports in 1958 on the Northern Pacific.
I found this car listed with a Hot Box set out report [ CJL 385] I would
like to know which railroad this might be from and the car type. I do not
know if this is a good reporting mark or not as it was done in pencil and
hard to read. Have looked in the Jan 1958 Official Railway Equipment
Register and could not find it. Any information on this car would be most
helpful.
Thank You
Gary










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This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
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Re: Know what railroad this is

 

Could it be >CIL<; which would be the Monon?


Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Date: Friday, June 6, 2014 at 3:32 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Know what railroad this is







While going thought some Dispatcher reports in 1958 on the Northern Pacific.
I found this car listed with a Hot Box set out report [ CJL 385] I would
like to know which railroad this might be from and the car type. I do not
know if this is a good reporting mark or not as it was done in pencil and
hard to read. Have looked in the Jan 1958 Official Railway Equipment
Register and could not find it. Any information on this car would be most
helpful.
Thank You
Gary









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Know what railroad this is

Gary Wildung
 

While going thought some Dispatcher reports in 1958 on the Northern Pacific. I found this car listed with a Hot Box set out report [ CJL 385] I would like to know which railroad this might be from and the car type. I do not know if this is a good reporting mark or not as it was done in pencil and hard to read.  Have looked in the Jan 1958 Official Railway Equipment Register and could not find it. Any information on  this car would be most helpful.
Thank You
Gary


Re: Central Valley trucks

Tony Thompson
 

JP Barger wrote:

 
I have a heck of a lot of these trucks which I use on models I have constructed because I have religiously harvested them from used assembled models and kits I have purchased over fifty years. I just install fitted Reboxx wheelsets to minimize friction, and improve operation and appearance. Today, the CV trucks are not impossible to find as they show up on models in collections just as they did earlier. You will find them at train shows where HO cars are laid out on the tables in great quantities. I sometimes buy models in conditions from pleasantly good to ridiculously bad just to get the CV trucks. All it takes is to scan through dozens and dozens of cars, not forgetting to look carefully at the trucks. And the other eye on the price of the car and the trucks.

     Oh, thanks, JP! You just drove up the cost of those poor old models which happen to have CV trucks. People used to not notice.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Central Valley trucks

JP Barger
 

On this list a week or so ago, members (among them, Denny Anspach) were discussing some of the history and features of the Central Valley freight trucks. Availability also was mentioned, prompting this email.

 

I also went through the quality disappointment when ownership was transferred after the George Hook period. I visited George's shop in the Valley way back in the 1960's, witnessing the epoxy insulation method. One "secret" in order to minimize runout was rotating the wheels on the axles to distribute the epoxy evenly before it set up.

 

I have a heck of a lot of these trucks which I use on models I have constructed because I have religiously harvested them from used assembled models and kits I have purchased over fifty years. I just install fitted Reboxx wheelsets to minimize friction, and improve operation and appearance. Today, the CV trucks are not impossible to find as they show up on models in collections just as they did earlier. You will find them at train shows where HO cars are laid out on the tables in great quantities. I sometimes buy models in conditions from pleasantly good to ridiculously bad just to get the CV trucks. All it takes is to scan through dozens and dozens of cars, not forgetting to look carefully at the trucks. And the other eye on the price of the car and the trucks.

 

Have fun!   JP


Q'Craft caboose kits

ed_mines
 

 Since some of you  have given up on wood car kits, does anyone have an Ambroid/Q'Craft HO scale caboose kits in your collection of kits never to be built that you'd be willing sell for a moderate price? Erie in particular.

 

Please contact me off list.

 

Ed Mines

ed_mines@...


Re: Ambroid cars kept in the freezer

Pierre Oliver
 

Or they're just emerging from this past winter in Canada. Had the furnace on last night it was so cold.
Waiting for the jail cell door to close
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 06/06/2014 3:38 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

 There are some built up Ambroid cars on ebay that are so white it looks like they wsere kept in the freezer.

 

Ed Mines



Ambroid cars kept in the freezer

ed_mines
 

 There are some built up Ambroid cars on ebay that are so white it looks like they wsere kept in the freezer.

 

Ed Mines


Re: CNJ Box Car Red?

ed_mines
 

How about an update on the RPC freight car color chart using the new fangled paints now available?

 

Ed Mines


Re: alcohol, dullcote & decals

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Ed,

My default flat finish is Model Masters Acrylic Flat. It was a little less expensive than the Polyscale. I also have been testing  Liquitex Acrylic Matte Medium. Both work well as a flat finish base and final overcoat (if needed) for PanPastels.  I have also  with Blue Label Artist Flat Fixative but got mixed results. This was possibly due to spraying in a cold damp basement this winter. What I am trying to find is an economical alternative to hobby brands.

 

Rob Manley

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 29, 2014 1:24 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] alcohol, dullcote & decals

 

 

One little crack and the alcohol can wick under and eat the decal. Solvoset is  diluted isopropanol.

 

I've had some bad experiences with thin film decals.

 

Is dullcote the current standard for flat finishes? Anyone use anything else?

 

Ed Mines


Re: X29 ends - PMM

Benjamin Hom
 

Rob Kirkham wrote:
"I think the interesting bit to me is that I had not heard of James Lane’s articles, nor those of Gary Rausch and Bob Johnson or Amerine until this discussion in this list. Each of those was published in a journal that was unknown to me back in the 1970s. I spent a few years there colleting back issue of MR and RMC, but that still didn’t give me awareness of other periodicals. In fact, I’m not sure when I first became aware of historical societies with publications – but it would have been in the 1980s.
 
It makes me think just how much easier it is to discover these things today."
 
This illustrates how difficult it was at first for prototype modeling to get traction - the major magazines at the time wouldn't touch this stuff during this era of "Olde Frothingslosh", so it fell to alternate venues to break the ice - minor magazines such as Protoype Modeler and its predecessors (e.g., Western Prototype Modeler, Santa Fe Modeler), historical society publications, and in the case of one extensive Jack Amerine treatise on the AAR boxcar design, a photocopied journal called something to the effect of "Modeler and Gaming History.  Credit definitely is due to the editorial staff at Railroad Model Craftsman in the mid-1970s, who took a chance with material such as Dennis Storzek's boxcar improvement article, the early NEB&W articles, and the Protofile series on modeling specific cars and locomotives.  This did a lot to give this thing called prototype modeling mainstream exposure.
 
 
Ben Hom


Re: Influences

Andy Sperandeo
 

I'll happily second Tony Thompson's comments about John Allen. He was a superior modeler, and proved more than once that when he put his mind to winning contest prizes he could walk off with the top awards. He was also better versed in prototype railroading than he's sometimes given credit for – for one thing, he saw and lived through a lot of railroading that we now have to study as history.

So long,

Andy 



Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Pierre Oliver
 

I had been lead to believe that baking paint like Scalecoat, would actually improve the adhesion of the paint to brass.
I know from experience that baked on lacquer and enamel paint resists scratching better.
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 6/6/2014 2:40 PM, 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Matt,


Baking is only appropriate for enamel based paint.  There is a school of thought that says that it causes the paint to "cure" or polymerize, which may well be true.  Never ever bake plastic or any metal that might melt (like some weights) and do not bake acrylic paints.  Baking an enamel paint job will allow you to move on to the next application more rapidly.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

On Jun 6, 2014, at 12:36 PM, Matt Goodman goodman312@... [STMFC] wrote:



Inexperience question here. 

My understanding regarding backing is that it is intended to drive off the volatiles in the freshly applied paint. Is this correct?  Also, I believe I read somewhere that letting a freshly painted model sit for several days (or longer) would accomplish the same thing - only (obviously) slower...

Good thread. 

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On May 27, 2014, at 10:02 PM, "'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Paul,

Skip the model "primer" because most of them are just plain paint. For dark colors, I paint with a Model Master flat black spray bomb and then with whatever I want to over that. For colors that I don't want a black layer under, I simply apply Scalecoat 1.  I don't bake - there is no need and too much risk for my taste. 

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Bruce Smith
 

Matt,

Baking is only appropriate for enamel based paint.  There is a school of thought that says that it causes the paint to "cure" or polymerize, which may well be true.  Never ever bake plastic or any metal that might melt (like some weights) and do not bake acrylic paints.  Baking an enamel paint job will allow you to move on to the next application more rapidly.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

On Jun 6, 2014, at 12:36 PM, Matt Goodman goodman312@... [STMFC] wrote:



Inexperience question here. 

My understanding regarding backing is that it is intended to drive off the volatiles in the freshly applied paint. Is this correct?  Also, I believe I read somewhere that letting a freshly painted model sit for several days (or longer) would accomplish the same thing - only (obviously) slower...

Good thread. 

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On May 27, 2014, at 10:02 PM, "'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Paul,

Skip the model "primer" because most of them are just plain paint. For dark colors, I paint with a Model Master flat black spray bomb and then with whatever I want to over that. For colors that I don't want a black layer under, I simply apply Scalecoat 1.  I don't bake - there is no need and too much risk for my taste. 

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Shorpy MDT Shops Photo

Charles Hladik
 

And those couplers sure look like KD #4's.
Chuck Hladik
 

In a message dated 6/6/2014 10:44:22 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
"Here is a link to a circa 1904 photo of the Merchants Despatch Transportation Company shops in Despatch (present-day East Rochester), New York. 
 
http://www.shorpy.com/node/8253?size=_original#caption
 
Click on the photo to enlarge it.  The amount of detail in the way of freight car parts is amazing."
 
Note that repair parts are organized and sorted for easy retrieval.  Even if you give allowances for a posed photo, this makes sense if your business is repairing cars in a timely manner, unlike the Allen/Sellios-inspired "piles of crap" approach model railroaders fall in love with.
 
Ben Hom


Re: Influences

Benjamin Hom
 

Dave Nelson wrote:
"Someone mentioned John Allen.  I don’t think John Allen did much of anything to advance our groups specific interests and many of his accolades certainly skewed things in the wrong direction. IMO RPM could be said to be a reactionary movement against Allen’s accolades.
 
That said Allen does deserve some credit, both as an inspiration of what to do – 3d details, some weathering, proper lighting… and what not to do – the allegorical instead of the actual."
 
A large part of this issue is how the press and NMRA hierarchy spin the work of the hobby's pioneers.  The superficial is emphasized over the hidden sophistication of the layout.  Dave mentioned some of John Allen's true innovations; another example is Frank Ellison's Delta Lines.  His concept of "the layout as a stage and the trains actors" and emphasis on operations vs. running trains aimlessly is interpreted as "he left pilot and trailing trucks off of a balky locomotive to keep trains running" (words to that effect from John Page IIRC).  You hear this from the Toy Train Bozo crowd a lot - folks who can't even to begin grasping the underlying concepts of why being able to run trains was important to Ellison.
 
You can argue that this is what modelers want, but the problem for years was that most modelers never knew that there was a contrasting viewpoint.  Sadly, this is still the case with many today.
 
 
Ben Hom

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