Date   

Re: ERIE 95000 series roofs

al_brown03
 

The SAL Mechanical Department "Standard Practice Circular F-1", dated 10/10/48 (reprinted by the ACL & SAL HS), directs that the underframes of most freight cars be given "one coat of car cement". Only for flat cars is any distinction made between the steel underframe and woodwork: "complete body and underframe not including woodwork to be painted with one coat of car cement". I've heard for several roads that undersides of house-car floors weren't to be painted, but I think the following conclusions may be drawn: (1) for underside woodwork to be unpainted *wasn't* universal practice; and (2) whatever color the underside was painted (or wasn't), in service it attracted a lot of "weathering".

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: ERIE 95000 series roofs

Tim O'Connor
 

Ed, would the underframe parts be painted before, or after, the floor was installed?
I've seen photos of new cars with unpainted floor boards (underneath) but I don't know
if this was a universal practice.

Tim O'Connor

Sides & doors were Pittsburgh Carhide Brown. Black (car cement) applied to the u/f and ends. Black truck side frames. White stencils with white & black Erie monogram.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: ERIE 95000 series roofs was RE: Painting HO Scale Brass

Ed Hawkins
 

On Jun 8, 2014, at 9:31 PM, abrown@fit.edu [STMFC] wrote:

In the end photo, the brake step looks lighter-colored than the end. Was the step unpainted too? That would look neat on a model.
Al,
In the "B" end ACF builder's photo there's no doubt that the brake step of Erie 95000 was unpainted galvanized steel (U.S. Gypsum). The ACF bill of materials typically don't say much, if anything, about running boards and brake steps. So we're at the mercy of photos to use as a guide.

The collection of ACF bills of materials is available for review at the St. Louis Mercantile Library for cars built from 1931 through 1952 (lot numbers 1200 to about 3700). A few are missing, but the collection is largely complete for this range of time.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: ERIE 95000 series roofs was RE: Painting HO Scale Brass

al_brown03
 

In the end photo, the brake step looks lighter-colored than the end. Was the step unpainted too? That would look neat on a model.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: X29 ends - PMM

Benjamin Hom
 

Lester Breuer asked:
"The discussion on X29 has been timely as I just acquired two Red Caboose 1924 body kits at an estate sale.  One kit missing truck side frames.  What would be the best truck replacement?"

If you can't find replacement Red Caboose trucks (which have the early 2D-F8 bolster design) or want a later version of the 2D-F8, the Bowser trucks are a nice replacement (S/N 74286 for the sideframes, 74277 for pair with wheelsets).  Kadee also offers a sprung 2D-F8 but hasn't reissued it in HGC yet.

I personally would go with the Bowser trucks, as I find sprung trucks unconvincing, but YMMV.


Ben Hom


Re: ERIE 95000 series roofs was RE: Painting HO Scale Brass

Armand Premo
 

    Thank you Ed.I really appreciate your help.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, June 08, 2014 7:47 PM
Subject: Re: ERIE 95000 series roofs was RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 


On Jun 8, 2014, at 1:42 PM, 'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC] wrote:

Likely black, originally, when built in 1942.  These had as you can see the small diamond.  Larger 6’ diamond were applied not long after.  When are you modeling?


Schuyler and Armand,
According to ACF paint specs in the bill of materials for lot 2288 (Erie 95000-95099), for new cars the roof seam caps were coated with black car cement while the rest of the roof (and running board) was unpainted galvanized steel. 

Sides & doors were Pittsburgh Carhide Brown. Black (car cement) applied to the u/f and ends. Black truck side frames. White stencils with white & black Erie monogram. 
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


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Re: ERIE 95000 series roofs was RE: Painting HO Scale Brass

Ed Hawkins
 


On Jun 8, 2014, at 1:42 PM, 'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC] wrote:

Likely black, originally, when built in 1942.  These had as you can see the small diamond.  Larger 6’ diamond were applied not long after.  When are you modeling?


Schuyler and Armand,
According to ACF paint specs in the bill of materials for lot 2288 (Erie 95000-95099), for new cars the roof seam caps were coated with black car cement while the rest of the roof (and running board) was unpainted galvanized steel. 

Sides & doors were Pittsburgh Carhide Brown. Black (car cement) applied to the u/f and ends. Black truck side frames. White stencils with white & black Erie monogram. 
Regards,
Ed Hawkins



Re: ERIE 95000 series roofs was RE: Painting HO Scale Brass

Armand Premo
 

        Thank you Schuyler 1948-50. I thought it might be black,but wanted to make sure..Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, June 08, 2014 2:42 PM
Subject: ERIE 95000 series roofs was RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

Likely black, originally, when built in 1942.  These had as you can see the small diamond.  Larger 6’ diamond were applied not long after.  When are you modeling?

Schuyler

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie95000bdb.jpg

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie95000adb.jpg

 

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie95000cdb.jpg

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, June 08, 2014 2:00 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

Speaking of painting,does a nyone know the color of the roof on the Erie's 95000 40' auto box cars? Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----

To: STMFC@...

Sent: Sunday, June 08, 2014 11:46 AM

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

Paul,
Order your Scalecoat direct. http://www.weavermodels.com/index.html

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com

On 6/8/2014 11:25 AM, 'Paul Hillman' chris_hillman@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Thanks everybody for the wonderful in-depth info on painting brass. My main conc ern is adherence of the paint especially on handrails & corners of parts. Grit-blasting down to clean brass and/or etching with vinegar & salt (HCL) are the beginning. Baking is a necessity, I agree also.

It appears that Scalecoat I paint wins out as the preferred paint to use for brass. However I have a problem acquiring it. I'm north of Houston, TX, and Walthers says (and my local Hobby Shop) that Scalecoat can't be shipped to Texas due to some "specialized permit". (Maybe I could drive to a hobby shop in Louisiana or Oklahoma. That's only a few 100 miles !) Maybe it's even illegal to bring it across the state line?

Seems like all other hobby paints are available here. Since Scalecoat is enamel-based, what about the qualities of like Testors enamels? Or, some kind of acrylic tha t "shrinks" for good adherence?

I tried the vinegar & salt and it worked ! I didn't leave the parts in the mix too long, but the cleaning-etching was obviously working. When ready to do the final cleaning, will leave the brass in the mixture longer, watching for any bad-affects on the solder (maybe). It doesn't bring it down to a "shiny" brass color. The surface remains darker in areas due to surface oxides, or whatever, not "dirts" or oils. Will the proper paints adhere to these surface-oxides, or is grit-blasting best down to entirely clean brass?

I tried CLR cleaner and it seems to do about the same level of general cleaning as the vinegar & salt, but don't know about it's etching ability. It tends to leave a reddish color, due to the copper in the brass , I believe.

Paul Hillman

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Santa Fe "steam tug tow boat"

rwitt_2000
 

A recent listing on eBay for a Santa Fe "steam tug tow boat".

Santa Fe Terminal Steam Tug Tow Boat Erecting Blueprint Diagram

  Bob Witt




Re: X29 ends - PMM

frograbbit602
 

The discussion on X29 has been timely as I just acquired two Red Caboose 1924 body  kits at an estate sale.  One kit missing truck side frames.  What would be the best truck replacement?  Thanks in advance.

Lester Breuer


ERIE 95000 series roofs was RE: Painting HO Scale Brass

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Likely black, originally, when built in 1942.  These had as you can see the small diamond.  Larger 6’ diamond were applied not long after.  When are you modeling?

 

Schuyler

 

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie95000bdb.jpg

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie95000adb.jpg

 

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie95000cdb.jpg

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, June 08, 2014 2:00 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

 

Speaking of painting,does anyone know the color of the roof on the Erie's 95000 40' auto box cars? Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Sunday, June 08, 2014 11:46 AM

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

 

Paul,
Order your Scalecoat direct. http://www.weavermodels.com/index.html

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com

On 6/8/2014 11:25 AM, 'Paul Hillman' chris_hillman@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Thanks everybody for the wonderful in-depth info on painting brass. My main concern is adherence of the paint especially on handrails & corners of parts. Grit-blasting down to clean brass and/or etching with vinegar & salt (HCL) are the beginning. Baking is a necessity, I agree also.

 

It appears that Scalecoat I paint wins out as the preferred paint to use for brass. However I have a problem acquiring it. I'm north of Houston, TX, and Walthers says (and my local Hobby Shop) that Scalecoat can't be shipped to Texas due to some "specialized permit". (Maybe I could drive to a hobby shop in Louisiana or Oklahoma. That's only a few 100 miles !) Maybe it's even illegal to bring it across the state line?

 

Seems like all other hobby paints are available here. Since Scalecoat is enamel-based, what about the qualities of like Testors enamels? Or, some kind of acrylic that "shrinks" for good adherence?

 

I tried the vinegar & salt and it worked ! I didn't leave the parts in the mix too long, but the cleaning-etching was obviously working. When ready to do the final cleaning, will leave the brass in the mixture longer, watching for any bad-affects on the solder (maybe). It doesn't bring it down to a "shiny" brass color. The surface remains darker in areas due to surface oxides, or whatever, not "dirts" or oils. Will the proper paints adhere to these surface-oxides, or is grit-blasting best down to entirely clean brass?

 

I tried CLR cleaner and it seems to do about the same level of general cleaning as the vinegar & salt, but don't know about it's etching ability. It tends to leave a reddish color, due to the copper in the brass, I believe.

 

Paul Hillman

 

 

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Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Armand Premo
 

Speaking of painting,does anyone know the color of the roof on the Erie's 95000 40' auto box cars? Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Sunday, June 08, 2014 11:46 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass

 

Paul,
Order your Scalecoat direct. http://www.weavermodels.com/index.html
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 6/8/2014 11:25 AM, 'Paul Hillman' chris_hillman@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Thanks everybody for the wonderful in-depth info on painting brass. My main concern is adherence of the paint especially on handrails & corners of parts. Grit-blasting down to clean brass and/or etching with vinegar & salt (HCL) are the beginning. Baking is a necessity, I agree also.
 
It appears that Scalecoat I paint wins out as the preferred paint to use for brass. However I have a problem acquiring it. I'm north of Houston, TX, and Walthers says (and my local Hobby Shop) that Scalecoat can't be shipped to Texas due to some "specialized permit". (Maybe I could drive to a hobby shop in Louisiana or Oklahoma. That's only a few 100 miles !) Maybe it's even illegal to bring it across the state line?
 
Seems like all other hobby paints are available here. Since Scalecoat is enamel-based, what about the qualities of like Testors enamels? Or, some kind of acrylic that "shrinks" for good adherence?
 
I tried the vinegar & salt and it worked ! I didn't leave the parts in the mix too long, but the cleaning-etching was obviously working. When ready to do the final cleaning, will leave the brass in the mixture longer, watching for any bad-affects on the solder (maybe). It doesn't bring it down to a "shiny" brass color. The surface remains darker in areas due to surface oxides, or whatever, not "dirts" or oils. Will the proper paints adhere to these surface-oxides, or is grit-blasting best down to entirely clean brass?
 
I tried CLR cleaner and it seems to do about the same level of general cleaning as the vinegar & salt, but don't know about it's etching ability. It tends to leave a reddish color, due to the copper in the brass, I believe.
 
Paul Hillman
 

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Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Pierre Oliver
 

No Texas? Really!
You'd think it was going to Canada.
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 08/06/2014 12:02 PM, 'Charlie Morrill' badlands@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Weaver won’t ship to Texas.  Their policy.  You can have a hobby shop outside Texas ship it to you or have some friend living outside Tex. get it for you.
 
Charlie in Texas --- still using Scalecoat that was purchased in Texas before Weaver decided to not sell it here.
Sent: Sunday, June 08, 2014 10:46 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass
 


Paul,
Order your Scalecoat direct. http://www.weavermodels.com/index.html
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 6/8/2014 11:25 AM, 'Paul Hillman' chris_hillman@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Thanks everybody for the wonderful in-depth info on painting brass. My main concern is adherence of the paint especially on handrails & corners of parts. Grit-blasting down to clean brass and/or etching with vinegar & salt (HCL) are the beginning. Baking is a necessity, I agree also.
 
It appears that Scalecoat I paint wins out as the preferred paint to use for brass. However I have a problem acquiring it. I'm north of Houston, TX, and Walthers says (and my local Hobby Shop) that Scalecoat can't be shipped to Texas due to some "specialized permit". (Maybe I could drive to a hobby shop in Louisiana or Oklahoma. That's only a few 100 miles !) Maybe it's even illegal to bring it across the state line?
 
Seems like all other hobby paints are available here. Since Scalecoat is enamel-based, what about the qualities of like Testors enamels? Or, some kind of acrylic that "shrinks" for good adherence?
 
I tried the vinegar & salt and it worked ! I didn't leave the parts in the mix too long, but the cleaning-etching was obviously working. When ready to do the final cleaning, will leave the brass in the mixture longer, watching for any bad-affects on the solder (maybe). It doesn't bring it down to a "shiny" brass color. The surface remains darker in areas due to surface oxides, or whatever, not "dirts" or oils. Will the proper paints adhere to these surface-oxides, or is grit-blasting best down to entirely clean brass?
 
I tried CLR cleaner and it seems to do about the same level of general cleaning as the vinegar & salt, but don't know about it's etching ability. It tends to leave a reddish color, due to the copper in the brass, I believe.
 
Paul Hillman
 



Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Charles Morrill
 

Weaver won’t ship to Texas.  Their policy.  You can have a hobby shop outside Texas ship it to you or have some friend living outside Tex. get it for you.
 
Charlie in Texas --- still using Scalecoat that was purchased in Texas before Weaver decided to not sell it here.

Sent: Sunday, June 08, 2014 10:46 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass
 


Paul,
Order your Scalecoat direct. http://www.weavermodels.com/index.html
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 6/8/2014 11:25 AM, 'Paul Hillman' chris_hillman@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Thanks everybody for the wonderful in-depth info on painting brass. My main concern is adherence of the paint especially on handrails & corners of parts. Grit-blasting down to clean brass and/or etching with vinegar & salt (HCL) are the beginning. Baking is a necessity, I agree also.
 
It appears that Scalecoat I paint wins out as the preferred paint to use for brass. However I have a problem acquiring it. I'm north of Houston, TX, and Walthers says (and my local Hobby Shop) that Scalecoat can't be shipped to Texas due to some "specialized permit". (Maybe I could drive to a hobby shop in Louisiana or Oklahoma. That's only a few 100 miles !) Maybe it's even illegal to bring it across the state line?
 
Seems like all other hobby paints are available here. Since Scalecoat is enamel-based, what about the qualities of like Testors enamels? Or, some kind of acrylic that "shrinks" for good adherence?
 
I tried the vinegar & salt and it worked ! I didn't leave the parts in the mix too long, but the cleaning-etching was obviously working. When ready to do the final cleaning, will leave the brass in the mixture longer, watching for any bad-affects on the solder (maybe). It doesn't bring it down to a "shiny" brass color. The surface remains darker in areas due to surface oxides, or whatever, not "dirts" or oils. Will the proper paints adhere to these surface-oxides, or is grit-blasting best down to entirely clean brass?
 
I tried CLR cleaner and it seems to do about the same level of general cleaning as the vinegar & salt, but don't know about it's etching ability. It tends to leave a reddish color, due to the copper in the brass, I believe.
 
Paul Hillman
 


Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Pierre Oliver
 

Paul,
Order your Scalecoat direct. http://www.weavermodels.com/index.html
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 6/8/2014 11:25 AM, 'Paul Hillman' chris_hillman@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Thanks everybody for the wonderful in-depth info on painting brass. My main concern is adherence of the paint especially on handrails & corners of parts. Grit-blasting down to clean brass and/or etching with vinegar & salt (HCL) are the beginning. Baking is a necessity, I agree also.
 
It appears that Scalecoat I paint wins out as the preferred paint to use for brass. However I have a problem acquiring it. I'm north of Houston, TX, and Walthers says (and my local Hobby Shop) that Scalecoat can't be shipped to Texas due to some "specialized permit". (Maybe I could drive to a hobby shop in Louisiana or Oklahoma. That's only a few 100 miles !) Maybe it's even illegal to bring it across the state line?
 
Seems like all other hobby paints are available here. Since Scalecoat is enamel-based, what about the qualities of like Testors enamels? Or, some kind of acrylic that "shrinks" for good adherence?
 
I tried the vinegar & salt and it worked ! I didn't leave the parts in the mix too long, but the cleaning-etching was obviously working. When ready to do the final cleaning, will leave the brass in the mixture longer, watching for any bad-affects on the solder (maybe). It doesn't bring it down to a "shiny" brass color. The surface remains darker in areas due to surface oxides, or whatever, not "dirts" or oils. Will the proper paints adhere to these surface-oxides, or is grit-blasting best down to entirely clean brass?
 
I tried CLR cleaner and it seems to do about the same level of general cleaning as the vinegar & salt, but don't know about it's etching ability. It tends to leave a reddish color, due to the copper in the brass, I believe.
 
Paul Hillman
 


Re: Influences

Steve and Barb Hile
 

I am a little late to this party, but I will add that Tony’s multi-part series on PFE reefers in RMC triggered a lot with me.  I even purchased extra copies of the magazines and started building collections of prototype based articles and photos from RMC, Model Railroading (Freight Cars of the 50’s series) etc. in binders separate from the magazine collection.

 

Of course, the PFE book became an important early purchase.

 

I fully agree about Terry’s UP book setting a very high standard for freight car source material.

 

Thanks to all who have, and continue to compile these kinds of source material.

 

Steve Hile

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 05, 2014 11:48 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Influences

 

 

      I was already attempting prototype modeling, but what really got my attention was Terry Metcalfe's book, Union Pacific Freight Cars, 1936-1951. I suddenly saw how this kind and amount of information could be organized and presented. It was the direct model for the car section of the PFE book and of my five volumes on SP freight cars. I still enjoy looking at Terry's book. While saying that, I regret, as I often do, that Terry is no longer with us.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...

Publishers of books on railroad history

 

 

 


Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Paul Hillman
 

Thanks everybody for the wonderful in-depth info on painting brass. My main concern is adherence of the paint especially on handrails & corners of parts. Grit-blasting down to clean brass and/or etching with vinegar & salt (HCL) are the beginning. Baking is a necessity, I agree also.
 
It appears that Scalecoat I paint wins out as the preferred paint to use for brass. However I have a problem acquiring it. I'm north of Houston, TX, and Walthers says (and my local Hobby Shop) that Scalecoat can't be shipped to Texas due to some "specialized permit". (Maybe I could drive to a hobby shop in Louisiana or Oklahoma. That's only a few 100 miles !) Maybe it's even illegal to bring it across the state line?
 
Seems like all other hobby paints are available here. Since Scalecoat is enamel-based, what about the qualities of like Testors enamels? Or, some kind of acrylic that "shrinks" for good adherence?
 
I tried the vinegar & salt and it worked ! I didn't leave the parts in the mix too long, but the cleaning-etching was obviously working. When ready to do the final cleaning, will leave the brass in the mixture longer, watching for any bad-affects on the solder (maybe). It doesn't bring it down to a "shiny" brass color. The surface remains darker in areas due to surface oxides, or whatever, not "dirts" or oils. Will the proper paints adhere to these surface-oxides, or is grit-blasting best down to entirely clean brass?
 
I tried CLR cleaner and it seems to do about the same level of general cleaning as the vinegar & salt, but don't know about it's etching ability. It tends to leave a reddish color, due to the copper in the brass, I believe.
 
Paul Hillman
 


Rapido GARX HO Scale Meat Reefer

Jason Shron
 

Hi guys,

The Meat Reefer was reviewed in the current issue of Model Railroader. So we've decided to extend the order deadline until the end of this month. Please reserve yours today!

Thanks,


Jason



Rapido HO 37' Meat Reefer - Second Run



Re: X29 ends - Westerfield

Peter Weiglin
 

Al Westerfield is generous in giving credit to those folks who helped him, even if that help started out as the picking of nits.  We're all grateful for those nit-pickers, perhaps not immediately, but eventually.

But it also should be pointed out that Al deserves much credit for LISTENING to, and making improvements based upon, those helpful communications.  He could have responded quite differently, e.g., "What difference does that make?  Only the nuts care about that."

Thank you, Al.

We can also wish and hope that the lesson is not lost on other manufacturers.

Peter Weiglin


Re: Painting HO Scale Brass

Matt Goodman
 

Thanks for the additional feedback on this topic - to all who participated. 

And yes, I meant "baking"...

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On Jun 7, 2014, at 1:38 AM, "tgregmrtn@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Can I take a minute and try to put this all in some sort of context?
 
First Matt asked:
 
"Inexperience question here.

My understanding regarding backing (baking?) is that it is intended to drive off the volatiles in the freshly applied paint. Is this correct?"
 
Matt, yes it accelerates drying process by evaporation of the chemical drying agents in the paint, Jerry Glow could explain it better as he is a former auto body repairman. The same baking techniques are used to do the same to prototype freight equipment, it is the application that differs.  
 
"Also, I believe I read somewhere that letting a freshly painted model sit for several days (or  longer) would accomplish the same thing - only (obviously) slower...

Good thread.

Matt Goodman

Columbus, Ohio"
 
That could be true but the heating process makes the enamel dry harder quicker. As I have said I don't bake my brass in the oven but I do in natural sunlight under supervision or under a 60 watt bulb perhaps overnight  in winter. If I want to bake solvent based enamels on plastic I dry them in natural sunlight with extra supervision as the combination of the solvents and the heat can soften plastic  
The Peter adds:
 
 
" I had been lead to believe that baking paint like Scalecoat, would actually improve the adhesion of the paint to brass."
 
Not really, adhesion would improve if you do as Schuyler and Mike mentions by lightly etching the surface chemically or with "grit blasting"

"I know from experience that baked on lacquer and enamel paint resists scratching better.

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com"
 
True" enamel" by it's nature/name is expected to be harder, the same with lacquer-based enamel, which would leave one to believe it would resist scratching better.  
 
Bruce writes:
 
"Matt,

Baking is only appropriate for enamel based paint."
 
Wait! I have an issue with this statement and it follows along with the use of the term, "Dulux Gold", Dulux is a brand not a specific color and enamel is referenced to a hardened surface paint not to a "base" of a paint. There are lacquer, alkyd resin, or poly-vinyl acrylic or latex vehicle based enamel paints...  
 
 
"There is a school of thought that says that it causes the paint to "cure" or polymerize, which may well be true. Never ever bake plastic or any metal that might melt (like some weights) and do not bake acrylic paints.  Baking an enamel paint job will allow you to move on to the next application more rapidly.

Regards

Bruce"
 
I am not sure why you wouldn't bake an acrylic/latex or poly vinyl acrylic paint as it would help the surface dry harder and as the late owner (his name escapes me Greg K??? help me out here Dennis) of ACUFLEX paint recommended you do exactly that because he reminded me that, "acrylics are like Spandex and shrink to fit..." He was right his paint went on what seems to be "goby" and once the surface was heated it shrunk incredibly tight to the surface. Wonderful stuff.
 
Schuyler replies: 
 
"Pierre is correct. When I have baked Scalecoat 1, the resulting finish is harder, glossier, and more resistant to scratching than any other paint I've used. Allowing paint to dry "until the odor is gone" works OK, but it will not give you the same durability of finish. It will scratch more easily and wear on grabs and other wear points."
 
Schuyler reinforces the point that baking results in a harder, glossier and more scratch resistant finish and testifies that Scalecoat 1 is the "one". No Contest here, I don't want to start a "my doges better than your dog"  thread,
 
The point is that heating the paint to a given temperature and holding it there for a given period of time does 1.) gas off the vehicle quicker, 2) promoting faster drying, 3) and enameling the surface faster. In the case of acrylic paints it "sucks" the paint tighter to the surface.  An equally hard surface can be achieved in time if allowed to simply air dry.
 
"Bruce offers "polymerize." Maybe. I don't know if that's what it does or not. But whatever it does, it works.

Schuyler"
 
Greg Martin
 



 

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