Date   

Re: Decal order

Dan Sweeney Jr
 

More than a year since he cashed my last check.  I fear health problems (?)
Dan Sweeney, Jr.
Alexandria, VA


Re: Decal order

Pierre Oliver
 

Have you got that query on auto repeat? :-)
Seems it shows up every month or so.
And no, I'm still owed an order.
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 12/06/2014 8:30 AM, jkcummings@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Has anyone heard from Gerald Glow?

James Cummings



Decal order

jimbojk2003
 

Has anyone heard from Gerald Glow?

James Cummings


Re: ERIE 95000 series roofs was RE: Painting HO Scale Brass

Tony Thompson
 

Al Kresse wrote:

Hot-dipped galvanized steel was difficult to paint.  When painted it tended to peel.  

   Quite true, but the same is true of all galvanized surfaces. The problem is the zinc surface, which has a loose oxide, so that paint has nothing solid to really stick to. It has nothing to do with the method by which the steel is galvanized, whether hot-dipped or literally galvanized by electrodeposition. Treatments to alter or "remove" the zinc oxide are intended to help paint adhesion.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: ERIE 95000 series roofs was RE: Painting HO Scale Brass

water.kresse@...
 

Hot-dipped galvanized steel was difficult to paint.  When painted it tended to peel.  One of the steel companies offered a post wash treatment making the panels more-paintable. 
 
HERE I AM MAKING AN ASSUMPTION --
 
Not being post processed in a stamping press, the coined or pressed and then welded steel grates would "I ASSUME" would be then dipped in a galvanizing bath . . . and could use a heavier coating of zinc like used for buckets.
Al Kresse



Re: ERIE 95000 series roofs was RE: Painting HO Scale Brass

Schleigh Mike
 

Armand Premo had asked, "Speaking of painting,does anyone know the color of the roof on the Erie's 95000 40'-6" IL  auto box cars?"  Schuyler Larrabee and Ed Hawkins responded with details of the original build during the Dec 1941-Feb 1942 construction.  Schuyler further asked the period of interest and Armand responded, "1948-1950."  For these 100 double-door cars, it now gets interesting for in 1949 the ERIE decided that these XA cars should become XM.
While no obvious car details changed, apparently most, if not all, were repainted at the road's Port Jervis car shop using the then current painting and stenciling practices.  The first obvious visual was the application of the now two-year old six foot diamond but roof and end treatment became the standard freight car red of the sides.  Since the running board was originally galvanized steel, it would not need to be painted but it would be at least subject to the overspray of the roof repainting.  It seems logical that under the running board it could still be black in less or more degree to the proportion that attempts were made to 'shoot' through and under the running board.  So, what to do?  It is our choice as we will likely never see a good photo disclosing this detail.  This writer, modeling post-1949, intends to paint the roof flat black then install the running board then follow with the red allowing some black to still be seen underneath.
Prior to this recent discussion, consideration was being given to modeling one or two of these cars.  The seemingly obvious first choice was the RC-8500 undecorated kit but look at the ends--not enough ribs on this 10'-0" IH model--need 10'-4" and 5-5 Dreadnaught.  The IMRC 40899 is the choice with a second door applied to the left.  Shortcomings with this choice are the doors (Is there anything like them possessing the prototype's rib/space/seam arrangement?), the sides lacking the every-other rivet vertical rows outboard of seams (Archer rivet time!), and slight geometry differences in the 'darts' on the end.  Trucks are National B with wrought-steel wheels.
In XM service the ERIE 95000-95999 cars would be found all over the North American system up to the 1960 merger.  Shortly thereafter the E-L sold the group to the Great Northern.
Modeling the 1948-1950 time period, Armand has an interesting choice--Which way to paint?  Before or after the 1949 repainting?
Arcane detail regards---Mike Schleigh


On Monday, June 9, 2014 7:36 PM, "'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Thanks, Ed.  I knew (and know now) that some of the ERIE’s cars were done this way, but didn’t think this was one of those series.  Models done this way attract attention, as they look so different than other cars in a train.
 
Schuyler
 
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, June 08, 2014 7:47 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: ERIE 95000 series roofs was RE: [STMFC] Painting HO Scale Brass
 
 
 
On Jun 8, 2014, at 1:42 PM, 'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC] wrote:


Likely black, originally, when built in 1942.  These had as you can see the small diamond.  Larger 6’ diamond were applied not long after.  When are you modeling?
 
Schuyler and Armand,
According to ACF paint specs in the bill of materials for lot 2288 (Erie 95000-95099), for new cars the roof seam caps were coated with black car cement while the rest of the roof (and running board) was unpainted galvanized steel. 
 
Sides & doors were Pittsburgh Carhide Brown. Black (car cement) applied to the u/f and ends. Black truck side frames. White stencils with white & black Erie monogram. 
Regards,
Ed Hawkins
 
 



Re: FW: Lovely image of early auto loading into a CIL gon

spsalso
 

If they're UN-loading them, then they likely would have already removed any protective tarps.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Re: MORE ERIE BOXCARS

water.kresse@...
 

Those details probably would have been covered in an Advisory Mechanical Committee (joint C&O, Erie, NKP and PM) specification.
 
Al Kresse


From: "Steam Era Frt Car Group"
To: "Steam Era Frt Car Group"
Sent: Wednesday, June 11, 2014 1:21:43 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] MORE ERIE BOXCARS


On Jun 11, 2014, at 11:58 AM, WILLIAM PARDIE PARDIEW001@... [STMFC] wrote:

Along with the recent discussion on Erie Boxcars can anyone tell me if the
roofwalks were painted on the Boxcars in the 78500 series? These were the

40' cars with the Viking roofs.

Bill,
ACF paint specs have the sides painted Sherwin-Williams freight car brown. No ACF paint sample was included in the bill of materials for this lot number (1948). Black car cement on the ends, roof, and underframe. Black trucks (side frames). The paint specs do not indicate if the Apex running boards/brake steps were to be painted or not, however, the builder's photo shows that the running boards and brake steps were not painted.

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie78500adb.jpg

Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: MORE ERIE BOXCARS

Ed Hawkins
 

On Jun 11, 2014, at 11:58 AM, WILLIAM PARDIE PARDIEW001@... [STMFC] wrote:

Along with the recent discussion on Erie Boxcars can anyone tell me if the
roofwalks were painted on the Boxcars in the 78500 series? These were the
40' cars with the Viking roofs.
Bill,
ACF paint specs have the sides painted Sherwin-Williams freight car brown. No ACF paint sample was included in the bill of materials for this lot number (1948). Black car cement on the ends, roof, and underframe. Black trucks (side frames). The paint specs do not indicate if the Apex running boards/brake steps were to be painted or not, however, the builder's photo shows that the running boards and brake steps were not painted.

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/erie78500adb.jpg

Regards,
Ed Hawkins


FW: Lovely image of early auto loading into a CIL gon

Charlie Vlk
 

Here is the original post with the link.

Charlie Vlk


Hi List Members,

Lovely image of early auto loading into a CIL gon - date is listed as 1920's.

https://rucore.libraries.rutgers.edu/rutgers-lib/19399/

Enjoy!

- Claus Schlund


MORE ERIE BOXCARS

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Along with the recent discussion on Erie Boxcars can anyone tell me if the
roofwalks were painted on the Boxcars in the 78500 series? These were the
40' cars with the Viking roofs.

Thank you in advance.

Bill Pardie


Re: The Irony of Cyanoacrylate

Carl Gustafson
 

On Tue, June 10, 2014 2:37 pm, Garth Groff sarahsan@... [STMFC]
wrote:
Friends,


Most ACC glues will keep longer in the bottle if stored in a
refrigerator.
That's Arrhenius' observation - roughly, a chemical reaction (like
cyanoacrylate, or casting resin curing) will double in temperature for
every 10 degree centigrade rise. Or to put the opposite, it'll slow by
half for every 10 degrees drop.

If room temperature is about 20-25C, and your refrigerator is 0-5C, that's
2 10 degree drops, so the cure rate will drop to 1/4 of room temperature
(or last 4x longer). At 30C (about 86F) it'll cure 2x faster that at 20C
(68F).

That holds for many (or most) chemical reactions.

Carl "Tutorial" Gustafson


Re: Lovely image of early auto loading into a CIL gon

water.kresse@...
 

Folks,
 
Was there a posted reference or link to this IMAGE?
 
Al Kresse


From: "Steam Era Frt Car Group"
To: "Steam Era Frt Car Group"
Sent: Wednesday, June 11, 2014 12:45:30 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Lovely image of early auto loading into a CIL gon

 

Claus-

Great shot!

It looks to be a Caswell….note the lower end with the slanted slot for the door opening mechanism.

Charlie Vlk



Re: Lovely image of early auto loading into a CIL gon

Charlie Vlk
 

Claus-

Great shot!

It looks to be a Caswell….note the lower end with the slanted slot for the door opening mechanism.

Charlie Vlk


Re: Lovely image of early auto loading into a CIL gon

Ray Breyer
 

Actually, this is completely right for trucks, but not for automobiles. Those WERE generally tarped when transported on flats or in gons. There are several wonderful photos of cars shipped this way (Buicks and Fords) in the DL&W company photo collection at Steamtown. Some of the tarps are even branded.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL



From: edb8391@... [STMFC] To: ;
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Lovely image of early auto loading into a CIL gon
Sent: Wed, Jun 11, 2014 3:19:35 AM



Bill Keene pondered:
Very interesting. Hopefully the cars were wrapped after being loaded to protect them from the elements.

Well, most likely no, Bill. 
These were open touring cars, very popular in the post WW I decades.
So all they probably did after loading them was put their tops up. Seat upholstery and inside door coverings were leather. Floor mats were rubber,  over replaceable, wooden floor boards in most of these cars.

Fully enclosed sedans were less common in the years up to the early 1920s They were more expensive as well. Usually the enclosed autos were shipped in box cars. Shipping in box cars was also done for higher-end marques such as Durant, Packard, Lincoln, Cadillac, Chandler, Pullman (an auto maker in York PA, not related to the railroad Pullman Company), Hudson and others into the early 1920s.
.
So some rain or even snow would not overly harm those open touring cars being loaded by crane into a gondola. They would dry out if they got wet. Any accumulated dirt in or on them was cleaned up at the dealership before delivery to a customer. Any damage found would likewise be repaired by the dealer, before a customer saw their new car. 

New cars were sometimes covered with canvas shrouds when delivered by highway truck in the post WW II years from the late 1940s to early 60s.That was when 'new models' were being introduced with hyped-up secrecy and great fanfare in the Fall before their advertised model year. Once that hoopla was over, the new cars were shipped totally uncovered. Its fairly recent that new cars are now being delivered sheathed in strategically placed protective plastic sheets.

Ed Bommer




Re: Lovely image of early auto loading into a CIL gon

Edward
 

Bill Keene pondered:
Very interesting. Hopefully the cars were wrapped after being loaded to protect them from the elements.

Well, most likely no, Bill. 
These were open touring cars, very popular in the post WW I decades.
So all they probably did after loading them was put their tops up. Seat upholstery and inside door coverings were leather. Floor mats were rubber,  over replaceable, wooden floor boards in most of these cars.

Fully enclosed sedans were less common in the years up to the early 1920s They were more expensive as well. Usually the enclosed autos were shipped in box cars. Shipping in box cars was also done for higher-end marques such as Durant, Packard, Lincoln, Cadillac, Chandler, Pullman (an auto maker in York PA, not related to the railroad Pullman Company), Hudson and others into the early 1920s.
.
So some rain or even snow would not overly harm those open touring cars being loaded by crane into a gondola. They would dry out if they got wet. Any accumulated dirt in or on them was cleaned up at the dealership before delivery to a customer. Any damage found would likewise be repaired by the dealer, before a customer saw their new car. 

New cars were sometimes covered with canvas shrouds when delivered by highway truck in the post WW II years from the late 1940s to early 60s.That was when 'new models' were being introduced with hyped-up secrecy and great fanfare in the Fall before their advertised model year. Once that hoopla was over, the new cars were shipped totally uncovered. Its fairly recent that new cars are now being delivered sheathed in strategically placed protective plastic sheets.

Ed Bommer


Re: The Irony of Cyanoacrylate

Andy Miller
 

Bill,



You’re lucky you can’t put your finger on it at the moment, because as with any ACC, you might never get your fingers apart again ;-)



Regards,



Andy Miller



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 10, 2014 6:58 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] The Irony of Cyanoacrylate





I was not familiar with the Microscale product—available since 2011—and found this video about it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mr81jLUdNZ8



I believe Loctite also makes a product that can be used with Engineering Plastics as well but I cannot put my hands on it the moment.



Regarding my complaint about the slippery tips accumulating ACC, I am meticulous about wiping the tips clean, as well as squeezing the lower sides of the tube to encourage the ACC to receed back into the tube. The problem with buildup seems to begin about halfway into the life of tube when for whatever reason the ACC becomes harder to coax back down into the tube.



I could not tell from the responses. Do the Loctite tubes have something inside the cap that minimizes buildup of residue or help keep the tip open?



Bill Welch


Re: The Irony of Cyanoacrylate

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Okay, I live where we don't know how to spell "humidy". I use Zap Thin AC which comes with a Teflon tube. Since CA cures with "humidy", I don't have a problem with CA drying at the end of the Teflon tube since it is typically pretty dry here. If it does dry (rarely), I just cut off the end of the tube. I don't attempt to even close the bottle since it isn't possible with the Teflon tube anyway.

A note: a couple of times (most recently today) I suddenly encounter a problem with CA curing but the joint being very weak. The solution...toss the old bottle even if it was still half full and substitute a fresh bottle.

Jack Burgess


Re: The Irony of Cyanoacrylate

Schuyler Larrabee
 

While Locktite seems to be the runaway winner here, I’ll mention that I’ve used “Gorilla Glue” ACC to build steam era freight cars with great success.

 

Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 10, 2014 8:22 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] The Irony of Cyanoacrylate

 

 

Bill,

 

               Yes, the Loctite cap appears to help to keep the tube open.  I have not experienced any clogs with Loctite ACC.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, June 10, 2014 3:58 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] The Irony of Cyanoacrylate

 

 

I was not familiar with the Microscale product—available since 2011—and found this video about it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mr81jLUdNZ8

 

I believe Loctite also makes a product that can be used with Engineering Plastics as well but I cannot put my hands on it the moment.

 

Regarding my complaint about the slippery tips accumulating ACC, I am meticulous about wiping the tips clean, as well as squeezing the lower sides of the tube to encourage the ACC to receed back into the tube. The problem with buildup seems to begin about halfway into the life of tube when for whatever reason the ACC becomes harder to coax back down into the tube.

 

I could not tell from the responses. Do the Loctite tubes have something inside the cap that minimizes buildup of residue or help keep the tip open?

 

Bill Welch


Re: MIG Productions

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

I've used their products to add texture to the side of rail such as mud, rust, etc. Oh yeah, that was O scale track...

 

Jack Burgess

 

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