Date   

Re: more freight cars from the far past

riverman_vt@...
 

Hi Dennis,

 

     Call them what you will, the y took me by surprise. I think of such things

as being largely European, much like what I see used in Russia or Ukraine

whenever Tanya and I go back to her home in Russia, which we have kept,

and what was seen last fall from Munich to Budapest, though rail clips seem

to be more common with concrete ties. Just how much use of these "screw

spikes" was made in North America? sort of reminds me of the Belfast &

Moosehead Lake in Maine which uses butt joints. That is joints side-by-side

in both rails rather than staggered.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine


Mopac versus Wabash wood caboose

reporterllc
 

How close are these Mopac cars to the Wabash 2600 serices?

 

http://www.lakejunctionmodels.com/Caboose.html

 

 

Victor Baird

www.erstwhilepublications.com

Fort Wayne, Indiana


Re: New CNWHS Modeler

John Larkin
 

Hi Ron,
     Thanks for the news on the C&NWHS modeling issue.  Got the mainline modelers today, came back early from working at the farm because one of our helpers (daughter's boyfriend, 19 years old and in good shape) had an early dinner with his godmother tonight.  His mom died from cancer about 3 weeks ago and we're all trying to keep him and his dad busy so they don't dwell on it too much.  Really good kid, going into his sophomore year at Marquette in Milwaukee this fall (Amtrak from Omaha!).  We're trying to clean up the front, get rid of half-buried barbed wire, nuisance trees, etc., all hot and sweaty but today was in the low 80's, relatively low humidity, not bad at all - but I still  need a shower! 

Thanks,

John


On Wednesday, June 25, 2014 1:51 PM, "cepropst@q.com [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Another well done magazine Ron!
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa



Re: New CNWHS Modeler

Clark Propst
 

Another well done magazine Ron!
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: more freight cars from the far past

Dennis Storzek
 

Screw spikes, Don

Dennis


Re: more freight cars from the far past

riverman_vt@...
 

    Of equal interest is the track in the second photo. Note the full use of tie plates but

rail held in place with BOLTS, not spikes!!!!

 

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: more freight cars from the far past

Riverboy
 

I like looking closely at old photos like these. In the first photo, the Illinois Central box car has a little bit of a sag in it, while the Southern car right behind it has a very slight arch to it. The rest of the cars appear to be straight.

Tod (Ohio)
 
 


On Tuesday, June 24, 2014 3:42 PM, "Charles Peck lnnrr152@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I love the saggy cars in both photos. There really IS a prototype for those
John Allen cars.
Chuck Peck


On Tue, Jun 24, 2014 at 3:29 PM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 
Check out the ACL truss rod vent box in the second photo.

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...




Re: more freight cars from the far past

Charles Peck
 

I love the saggy cars in both photos. There really IS a prototype for those
John Allen cars.
Chuck Peck


On Tue, Jun 24, 2014 at 3:29 PM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Check out the ACL truss rod vent box in the second photo.

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...



Re: more freight cars from the far past

O Fenton Wells
 

Check out the ACL truss rod vent box in the second photo.

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


New CNWHS Modeler

ron christensen
 

A new CNWHS Modeler Volume #7, Issue #2

Can be found on the web site.

http://www.cnwhs.org/modeling.htm

In This Issue:

• Scratch building M&StL (GATC leased) Stock Cars

• Building a 1970s Grain Boxcar Fleet – Part 3

• Modeling a Chicago & North Western Class J-S Part 4

• Installing DCC and Sound in a CNW Alco S-1

• Some Lettering Variations On Chicago Great Western Steam

Locomotives

Ron Christensen



Re: Southern Car & Foundry

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 


Yes, I had. It is consistent with various notes I found in trade publications with one importat addition. The USRS Anniston plant became part of SC&F during 1899 meaning that SC&F quicky gained control of all Southern car builders, not just all except one.
 

Eric, very likely you have seen this link, but just in case here it is. Doesn't mention PSC but is generally along the lines of your outline and has references

http://www.midcontinent.org/rollingstock/builders/southerncarfoundry.htm


Eric Lombard
Homewood, IL


On Tue, Jun 24, 2014 at 8:38 AM, 'Eric Neubauer' eaneubauer@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

It just hit me. Circumstantial evidence suggests that Southern Car & Foundry (1988-1904) was controlled by the same interests as Pressed Steel Car. Has anyone else come to this conclusion? Their Memphis plant apparently went to ACF and their Lenoir plant to Southern Railway. In 2-02, SC&F was building a new plant in Alabama to manufacture pressed steel cars which now makes complete sense
 
Eric.



more freight cars from the far past

Schuyler Larrabee
 

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-24-14/C4664.jpg

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-06-24-14/C4665.jpg

 

Bob Bahrs, one of the erielack experts (principally on the DL&W) provides these notes:

 

C4664 & C4665 Mr Bunnell has moved seven miles east to a little east of

Johnson City, NY at MP 193.   C4664  looks east and C4665 looks west.

This of course is still in the

area where the Erie and Lackawanna were right alongside each other.

 

The photo is on the Lackawanna tracks, and the train of freight cars adjacent is on the ERIE.  You freightcarologists will be kicking yourselves that you cannot walk along the line photographing each and every one of those cars.  Maybe in particular “Atlantic Coast Despatch” ACL 23215.  I know I am.

 

 

Schuyler


Re: Southern Car & Foundry

Eric Lombard
 

Eric, very likely you have seen this link, but just in case here it is. Doesn't mention PSC but is generally along the lines of your outline and has references

http://www.midcontinent.org/rollingstock/builders/southerncarfoundry.htm


Eric Lombard
Homewood, IL


On Tue, Jun 24, 2014 at 8:38 AM, 'Eric Neubauer' eaneubauer@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

It just hit me. Circumstantial evidence suggests that Southern Car & Foundry (1988-1904) was controlled by the same interests as Pressed Steel Car. Has anyone else come to this conclusion? Their Memphis plant apparently went to ACF and their Lenoir plant to Southern Railway. In 2-02, SC&F was building a new plant in Alabama to manufacture pressed steel cars which now makes complete sense
 
Eric.



Southern Car & Foundry

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 

It just hit me. Circumstantial evidence suggests that Southern Car & Foundry (1988-1904) was controlled by the same interests as Pressed Steel Car. Has anyone else come to this conclusion? Their Memphis plant apparently went to ACF and their Lenoir plant to Southern Railway. In 2-02, SC&F was building a new plant in Alabama to manufacture pressed steel cars which now makes complete sense
 
Eric.


Re: Steamtown Images

Eric Lombard
 

Mike and Schuyler -
Thank you for sharing the information on the current process and future plans for the Steamtown images. It all makes good sense to me and I really appreciate, as I'm sure we all do, the time and effort being put into making the images available by both Patrick McKnight at the NPS and the fellows at the EL discussion list.

Eric Lombard
Homewood, IL


On Sun, Jun 22, 2014 at 10:06 PM, MDelvec952@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 



All,

The Steamtown collection is a great resource, and it's huge. The goal is to make the entire collection public somehow. There is an NPS portal through which some of the images are being added, and when it's ready to go public it will be announced.

The person most responsible for the collection, and has done an incredible job or organizing the volunteers and interns who have scanned more than 20k glass-plate-negatives, and cataloging more than an acre of file boxes, more than 100,000 rolled maps and drawings, years of train dispatcher sheets, is Steamtown historian Pat McKnight, at Pat_McKnight@....  This project that Pat has led and cultivated for several years is historically priceless. And collections have attracted other collections which has created perhaps the biggest accumulation of late 19th and early 20th Century business records available. The personal coorespondence of Sam Sloan and William Truesdale are among the DL&W stuff. Sloan had been president, officer or principle of more than 30 railroads during his life, from the Lackawanna in the East to a component of the Green Bay & Western. Sloan, Iowa, was named for him. If ever there was a subject for book-like treatise.

Please don't think or perpetuate any thinking that NPS has chosen the EL group as an outlet. Officially, the NPS will make the collection public. The EL list contains the largest concentration of Lackawanna and Erie historians and former employees available, so Historian McKnight on his own time shares five images daily so that this body of experts can opine and help identify the locations of the images. The feedback that comes from the list is added to the NPS database and spread sheets, information that will outlast all of us. The images are primarily to document construction or injury scenes, so the inclusion of freight equipment is usually incidental unless the injury occurred on the equipment.

While it's not currently easy to handle requests for images, be patient, as public display of this archive is a high priority. The Erielack archive link posted in another note should whet the whistle for those interested in the 1908-WWI-era freight cars.

Hope this helps                  ....Mike Del Vecchio

President, Tri-State Chapter NRHS (one of the groups supplying volunteers and a big part of the DL&W archive material now housed at Steamtown)







-----Original Message-----
From: Eric Lombard elombard@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sun, Jun 22, 2014 7:04 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Steamtown Images

 
Thanks, Ray... I wonder that it appears as if the NPS has selected the EL list as a publication site. Seams a bit odd to me. Nothing against the EL, but my experience is that government organizations generally curate and make available their holdings via their own publication process.  I have emailed the curator at Steamtown whose name is on the photos to see if there is a way to directly access the collection. Also pinged my daughter who is an NPS ranger at Grand Canyon to see if she can find out. Eric

Eric Lombard
Homewood, IL


On Sun, Jun 22, 2014 at 4:36 PM, Ray Breyer rtbsvrr69@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 
>>Can someone share a URL for direct access the Steamtown image collection?

>>Probably I missed something but could not find a link on the Steamtown website.
>Eric Lombard
>Homewood, IL

Hi Eric,

As far as I know, the entire collection is being posted to the EL list, five a day.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL




Re: Tropicana in the 1950s

Guy Wilber
 

FGE Bill wrote:
 
"While they were effective at maintaining low temperatures, the power plants were fueled by gasoline meaning that they could only run on the FGE/WFE/BRE System including their contracted lines, as the RR's outside the system would not accept them for interchange because of the fuel  they used."
 
 
Bill,
 
 This was a provision of the Interchange Rules which gave the receiving roads the discretion to accept the cars in interchange (or not), so there may well have been some acceptance of such cars in off line use.   
 
Commenting on Bill's post,  Mark Rickert stated:
 
"Thank the AAR for that. (interchange rule 2)."
 
Thank the AAR for what?  If you are going to make reference to the Rule why not give some details?  Rule 2 covers a myriad of items, not just the provisions for accepting mechanical reefers powered by gasoline and LPG?   
 
 
First added to the Interchange Rules in 1953, the section of Rule 2 governing the interchange of mechanical reefers equipped with gas engines reads as such:
 
Rule 2, Section (d) Cars, loaded or empty, equipped with engines or heaters for the operation of which flammable liquids or gases having a flash point 80 degrees F., (open cup) or lower are used, for heating, lighting or refrigeration, will not be accepted in interchange except as follows:
 
(3)  Cars equipped with installations using gasoline or liquified petroleum gas to operate units for refrigeration purposes, are acceptable in interchange (for freight movement only) except where routed to or through areas where railroad has placed restriction specifically prohibiting the operation of such cars.  Railroads having such areas where the operation of such cars is prohibited or restricted, shall so indicate by publishing the location and extent of such areas by means of a suitable note in the publication "Railway Line Clearances".  Owners of cars equipped with such installations must indicate by a suitable explanatory note in the "Official Railway Equipment Register" the reporting marks, serial numbers and kind of equipments using fuels that would subject them to restricted operation as provided herein.  All such cars must be permanently placarded "Gasoline Driven Refrigeration Units" or Liquified Petroleum Gas Driven Refrigeration Units."
 
Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada    
 
 


Re: FW: (erielack) Steamtown Images--June 21, 2014 (C4646 thru C4650)

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <guycwilber@...> wrote :
 
"There is absolutely no way that the crew is just finishing applying the grain doors.  Those  grain doors which are on the ground are beat to hell and still contain nails which you can clearly see at the ends indicating that they have been removed from the car.  Grain doors were typically built up with two layers while the ones on the ground in this photo have been separated during removal. "

Guy, I concede your point.

I did find my copy of Hilton and DUE (gotta get those names correct!) They consistently use SL&NRR for the Syracuse Lake Shore & Northern, rather than SLS&N; I would assume they saw enough official correspondence and filings during their research that they had good reason to make that choice.

Dennis Storzek


Re: FW: (erielack) Steamtown Images--June 21, 2014 (C4646 thru C4650)

rwitt_2000
 

FWIW, it looks like a team track to me so any load in any type of freight car could appear.

The roadway seems wider providing a lane for trucks or wagons next to the railroad track. The first image in this group captures the end of the spur and two horse and wagon teams in the background.

An interesting scene with a meandering track along a city street.

Bob Witt, Indianapolis, IN


Re: FW: (erielack) Steamtown Images--June 21, 2014 (C4646 thru C4650)

Guy Wilber
 

Dennis wrote:
 
"For that matter, for all we know, the car is spotted at the shipper. The crew is just finishing applying the grain doors... without seeing the other side of the car, it's hard to tell."
 
 
There is absolutely no way that the crew is just finishing applying the grain doors.  Those  grain doors which are on the ground are beat to hell and still contain nails which you can clearly see at the ends indicating that they have been removed from the car.  Grain doors were typically built up with two layers while the ones on the ground in this photo have been separated during removal. 
 
Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Re: FW: (erielack) Steamtown Images--June 21, 2014 (C4646 thru C4650)

Dennis Storzek
 

Nobody is documenting the damaged car. If they were, it would be central to the image. The car has been coopered, and is perfectly fit for service... the shipper loaded it, right?

99 times out of 100, boxcar ends were damaged from the inside, when the load broke loose and tried to blast its way out of the car. You would think that the shipper of this load of granular material ( the car is fitted with grain doors) should have rejected this car, but hey, when cars were hard ti get, you take what is offered.

For that matter, for all we know, the car is spotted at the shipper. The crew is just finishing applying the grain doors... without seeing the other side of the car, it's hard to tell.

No matter, since the car is not centered in the frame, it's not the subject of interest, just an incidental bystander. If the end damage was the point of interest, I'd expect to see close-ups of the repair, complete with a stream of grain trickling out.

Thanks, Scott, for the id of the location... it will save me from trying to find my copy of Hilton & Drew after all these years.

Dennis

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