Date   

Re: Richard Hendrickson

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

I rarely comment on the passing of fellow
modelers - Richard is an exception. I knew
Richard mostly from this very list, but I also
had the good fortune to attend several of
his clinics and to talk with him 1-on-1 from
time to time.

Richard was a resource. Most of us that have
studied freight cars or the Santa Fe owe a large
part - in fact I'll go so far as to the "the largest
part" - of what we know to Richard. Not always
directly - but Richard always inspired others to
learn, research, and to

reach for higher levels of prototypical
accuracy in our modeling.

That was and is Richard's legacy. We have all
been influenced by or learned directly from
Richard ... and those he helped.

Said in another way - I used to "just replace the
drop steps, grabs, trucks, etc." on my models.
Not all of them but some of them.
Thanks to Richard - and the rest of you - I now
take the time to research "what should I be
using for my replacement details ... as in -which-
drop step, grab, truck, etc. ... is prototypically
correct for the car I happen to be working on.

- Thank you - Richard (and all) ... I have
always been humbled and inspired by
your long list of contributions ... Jim Betz


Re: Richard Hendrickson

Joseph
 

Tough news. AS a complete and utter freight car newbie, I posted on the old freight car list a question about the Atheran Gon, to which Richard kindly responded(including the "Train Set bozos" phrase that many find so, umm, amusing?) that I should probably look hard at my freight car fleet. Now have just a couple of blue box kits left on the layout, and a lot more resin kits...

What a great guy, who shared what ever knowledge he had amassed, was a mentor of model railroading to so many, and allowed me to tag along on a lunch excursion at a Naperville of years past.

All model railroaders need to thank him for at least part of the "Golden Age" of more accurate freight cars available now.

Clear skies or Green signals, Richard


Joe Binish
New Hope, MN

----- Original Message -----
From: "Tony Thompson tony@signaturepress.com [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Cc: "Espee List" <Espee@yahoogroups.com>; "Greg Martin" <tgregmrtn@aol.com>; "Bob Church" <gorail@earthlink.net>; "Ray DeBlieck" <raydbcs@aol.com>; "Otis McGee" <omcgeejr@aol.com>
Sent: Tuesday, July 01, 2014 9:22 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Richard Hendrickson


I have just heard the terribly sad news that Richard died in a fall a couple of days ago. I don't know any details. Richard was a marvelously well-informed historian and modeler, and always very generous with his time and information to anyone who needed help. An awful lot of us will miss him greatly.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history






------------------------------------
Posted by: Tony Thompson <tony@signaturepress.com>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links



Re: Richard Hendrickson

O Fenton Wells
 

Wow, black day for this hobby.
Fenton

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: Richard Hendrickson

golden1014
 

Tony,

Thanks for letting us know.  I know you and Richard were close and spreading the news must be especially hard for you.  Richard was a wonderful guy and I'll miss him.  He always set a great example for me--to share, learn, grow and live joyfully.  His generosity was unsurpassed.  He was always willing to give and never seemed to have any expectations in return.  

I've enjoyed reading everyone's recollections and am happy to learn that he treated everyone else the same as he treated me.  I hope to be more like him someday.

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL



Re: Richard Hendrickson

Greg Martin
 

Dave,
 
I remember that like it was yesterday. I was there with my brother and father and two very close friends Jim Evans and Pete Hayward. At that point he became the man to watch in the Prototype Modeling community and we are the beneficiaries of his work.
 
Paul Lubeliner was showing rubber nose renderings of his F units.
 
I have so many fond memories of Richard and Sandra and this all seems so very surreal.
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 7/1/2014 11:43:51 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

Richard will be truly missed by all. He is someone who has given so much to the hobby, with his vast knowledge and willingness to share it.
My first remembrance of him was, I think, at a 1986 SFMO meet at a church in Huntington Beach, California. Richard was giving a clinic in the main meeting room. Here from the back of the room comes this long haired guy in a flowing white poet shirt with the billowy sleeves and a man purse. Quite an impression among the usual train tee shirt crowd.
During the 1994 Santa Fe convention in San Diego, I was at that time modeling contemporary Santa Fe. However the railroad had just announced their intention to merge with the Burlington Northern. Richard while looking over my models announced: "Well Hussey, looks like you just became a period modeler". He was rig ht. 
Over those almost 30 years we have shared meals and stories about trains, airplanes, beer, wine   and European travel once or twice a year at the various RPM and society meets. I will truly miss him. My thoughts and condolences go out to Sandra.

Dave Hussey


Re: Richard Hendrickson

asychis@...
 

That is terrible news.  Although I never met Richard, he was extremely helpful to me a number of times when we were deciding on custom cars for the Amarillo Railroad Museum.  Always a font of knowledge and a very kind demeanor.  He will be missed for years to come.  Condolences and prayers to his family.
 
Jerry Michels


Re: Richard Hendrickson

Andy Sperandeo
 

Richard's passing is sad news indeed. He was a leading freight car historian and also a great authority on the Santa Fe, where his expertise extended to steam locomotives and many other subjects. I'll remember him from the Santa Fe society's conventions as well as the Naperville and Cocoa Beach meets, from many operating sessions across the country, and for all-too-few get-togethers for wine and dinner. His many publications keep his contributions alive for us, and I especially appreciated an excellent survey article on freight cars of the fifties he wrote for a Model Railroader special issue I edited, "How To Model Railroads of the 1950s." The fact that Richard himself modeled the Santa Fe of 1947 was one of many good reasons for me to pick the same year for my own modeling.

Richard will be missed by so many friends and admirers, and my heart goes out to Sandra for her special loss.

So long to a good friend,

Andy


Re: Empty/load sensor for braking

Eric Neubauer <eaneubauer@...>
 


Now that you mention it, I see the RDG (P&R in 1922) HTL system also has a manual control to select empty or load. One would guess the manual system the RDG tried was not satisfactory for them since it wasn't even repeated on virtually identical reorders of the same design placed less than two years later. Current systems I've taken note of are automatic.
 
Eric N.

Both C&O and Virginian used "manually selected empty or loaded" K and then AB scheduled air brakes on their 6-wheel trucked 91-ton and 109-ton gondola cars from circa 1920.  They were normally stenciled to not be humped in the yards.  Loaded cars with their brakes set on empty made for lively events.   Post WW2 Westinghouse was pushing "automatic" empty or loaded air brakes sensed in the trucks.
Al Kresse


From: "Steam Era Frt Car Group"
To: "Steam Era Frt Car Group"
Sent: Tuesday, July 1, 2014 8:12:16 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Empty/load sensor for braking

 

I’m reading a technical article describing the problems inherent to the different air pressure needs of brake equipment on empty vs. loaded cars and the described solution is a slightly larger auxiliary reservoir, a small reservoir attached to  the brake cylinder, and a simple load/empty valve whose position is determined by how far down the truck springs are compressed.

 

The explanation for the different needs of loaded vs. empty cars and how the problem was solved are clear enough by it doesn’t say when the idea was adopted by railroads.  I’m wondering if this is a modern solution or something that was rolled out and used in the steam era.

 

The explanation is here: << http://www.alkrug.vcn.com/rrfacts/brakes.htm>> and may be found about 60% of the way down the page.

 

Anyone know when this became the norm?



Re: Richard Hendrickson

George Corral <jorgec@...>
 

The modeling community has lost another great one. We've all benefitted
from his superlative knowledge of modeling and the prototype. He generously
answered questions and providing information he researched. I was fortunate
to have met him at the Cocoa Beach RPM in past years and that I was able to
attend several of his clinics. Thank you, Richard. You will be greatly
missed.



George Corral




<http://catmbr.org/VB_forum/newreply.php?s=74fda19693d8635e167de7b1c790b896&
do=newreply&p=8572> Reply With QuoteLa Grange, KY


Re: Richard Hendrickson

rob.mclear3@...
 

Gentlemen

This is not the news any of us needed to hear.   I am simply stunned and extremely upset at the news of Richard's passing.   I was just talking with him via the net a couple of days ago regarding Tangents new tank car release and as always he was helpful and frank.   I too had never met him but have corresponded with him over the net and spoke to him on one occasion by phone.   We spoke on freight cars on many occasions and his willingness to help a neophyte in freight car modelling like myself was very humbling.  He was a great teacher and someone I found it very easy to relate to.   We spoke on aviation and sailing as well and he was always interested to hear of my naval service.

In the field of Model Railroading and more particularly prototype modelling he will not be able to be replaced.   His knowledge of Freight cars of all roads and steam engines of the Santa Fe in particular was legion.   He was simply a giant in the field and his like will not be seen again.   I am deeply saddened by his sudden passing and will miss his advise and counsel, he had a way of getting straight to the point and to the heart of the matter that I found quite helpful and I liked his no nonsense attitude.   He was always quick with a response and was happy to share his knowledge to all of us, the Freight Car Truck handout for example, has been spread around the globe and all of us are more knowledgeable and the wiser for it.

He and his family will be in my prayers tonight, I feel especially for his family and friends at this time as the loss they have suffered in so sudden a manner must be devastating to all of them.

Rest In Peace Richard I am proud to have known you and to have been taught so much by you, thanks mate.

Farewell mate.

Rob McLear
Kingaroy Australia.


Re: Richard Hendrickson

Gary Roe
 

Well said Marty.

As with all of you, Richard has helped me with various information over the years.  The first time I contacted him, he didn't know me from Adam; but he took the time to answer.  At the next Naperville RPM, he sought me out to visit a while.

I certainly was not looking forward to this news.

gary roe
quincy, illinois



From: "mjmcguirk@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, July 2, 2014 6:55 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Richard Hendrickson

 
Many academics have been model railroaders over the years, but Richard truly had the heart and soul of a teacher. And that's not something that's easily found. His hobby legacy wasn't a complete detailed model railroad that was featured in books, magazines in videos. Instead, his hobby legacy exists in the form of the freight cars on every other model railroad.
Rest in peace.
 
Marty McGuirk
 
 

 



Re: [Espee] Richard Hendrickson

 

I would like to add my name to the multitude who mourn his passing. Though I
never met him, his contributions to the hobby were innumerable. My most
sincere condolences to his entire family and host of friends.

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: Espee List <Espee@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: Espee List <Espee@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Tuesday, July 1, 2014 at 9:22 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Cc: Espee List <Espee@yahoogroups.com>, Greg Martin <tgregmrtn@aol.com>,
Bob Church <gorail@earthlink.net>, Ray DeBlieck <raydbcs@aol.com>, Otis
McGee <omcgeejr@aol.com>
Subject: [Espee] Richard Hendrickson







I have just heard the terribly sad news that Richard died in a
fall a couple of days ago. I don't know any details. Richard was a
marvelously well-informed historian and modeler, and always very generous
with his time and information to anyone who needed help. An awful lot of us
will miss him greatly.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Richard Hendrickson

Frank Hodina
 

Richard’s the one who introduced me to prototype modeling and Martin Lofton. He was always there to help with the next pattern project or to root out information on some arcane freight car I was working on. Boy I’ll miss him!

 

Frank Hodina

Byron Illinois

 


Re: Empty/load sensor for braking

water.kresse@...
 

Both C&O and Virginian used "manually selected empty or loaded" K and then AB scheduled air brakes on their 6-wheel trucked 91-ton and 109-ton gondola cars from circa 1920.  They were normally stenciled to not be humped in the yards.  Loaded cars with their brakes set on empty made for lively events.   Post WW2 Westinghouse was pushing "automatic" empty or loaded air brakes sensed in the trucks.
Al Kresse


From: "Steam Era Frt Car Group"
To: "Steam Era Frt Car Group"
Sent: Tuesday, July 1, 2014 8:12:16 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Empty/load sensor for braking

 

I’m reading a technical article describing the problems inherent to the different air pressure needs of brake equipment on empty vs. loaded cars and the described solution is a slightly larger auxiliary reservoir, a small reservoir attached to  the brake cylinder, and a simple load/empty valve whose position is determined by how far down the truck springs are compressed.

 

The explanation for the different needs of loaded vs. empty cars and how the problem was solved are clear enough by it doesn’t say when the idea was adopted by railroads.  I’m wondering if this is a modern solution or something that was rolled out and used in the steam era.

 

The explanation is here: << http://www.alkrug.vcn.com/rrfacts/brakes.htm>> and may be found about 60% of the way down the page.

 

Anyone know when this became the norm?



Re: Richard Hendrickson

water.kresse@...
 

Very sad!  Do we know what happened?  . . . what type of accident?  There are many of us now of an age who are vulnerable to slips, etc. who are "not tuned-in" to what we are doing around the house or yard. We were just talking yesterday about "seniors on ladders trimming tree branches."
 
It has to be a shock to his family.  He will be missed.
Al Kresse, Romeo, Michigan


From: "Steam Era Frt Car Group"
To: "Steam Era Frt Car Group"
Sent: Wednesday, July 2, 2014 4:49:31 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Richard Hendrickson

 

Vow, very sad news. :-(
My deepest sympathy to his family and friends.



Re: Richard Hendrickson

Marty McGuirk
 

Like all of you I was shocked and saddened to check my email and see Tony's note on Richard's sudden and apparently completely unexpected passing. Only last night I was decaling a car using a photo Richard had scanned and sent to me a couple of weeks ago.

Richard has been a tremendous help to me over the years as he has been to many of you. More importantly he was always a friend just as willing to talk about old Navy biplanes as Santa Fe reefers or stock cars. 

And, while he took his research efforts very seriously, he always seemed to get a lot of enjoyment out of living life. 

Many academics have been model railroaders over the years, but Richard truly had the heart and soul of a teacher. And that's not something that's easily found. His hobby legacy wasn't a complete detailed model railroad that was featured in books, magazines in videos. Instead, his hobby legacy exists in the form of the freight cars on every other model railroad.

Rest in peace.

 

Marty McGuirk

 

 


 


Richard

George Hollwedel
 

Awful news. Richard helped many times with my projects. I will mis talking old English sports cars with him as well.

Prototype N Scale Models (TM)
by George Hollwedel
2108 Buffalo Tundra Dr
Austin, TX 78754-5960
512-579-0539
http://www.micro-trains.com/hollwedel.php
http://www.atlasrr.com/special.htm
http://intermountain-railway.com/n/sr/nsr.htm
http://www.bluford-shops.com/bluford_93_014.htm


Re: Richard Hendrickson

np328
 

    I too am stunned by the news of Richard’s passing. As Bill wrote, this is not the news one likes to start the day with.

 

     I had talked to Richard perhaps two or three months ago about sending scans of trucks and truck frames from builders car folios to help amp up his truck information site. I now read in these recent posts that other had projects in the works with him. I could ask how he found the time - however after interacting with him, it seems just like Richard. He was very involved and you could feel his love, his passion, for it all as he talked to you.

 

    I was also surprised how much Richard could tell me about the cars of my railroad or any other railroads, and as others have noted, openly shared it. In the past I would send a query to him and back would come a prompt reply.  

 

   In addition while researching I would find data that I would feel was significant and new only to find months or years later while paging through an older periodical, Richard had already been there.

 

I am stunned, and humbled, by his passing.                    James Dick - Roseville, MN.


Re: Richard Hendrickson

Mark.Rossiter@...
 

There's little I can add to what has already been said of Richard.  Like many on the STMFC group, I never met Richard face to face, but I eagerly gobbled up whatever he had to say and wherever he said it.  He always responded quickly to the several private e-mails I sent him asking about what trucks would have been appropriate for a given freight car.  99.99% of the time when Richard spoke on any given topic, it was the gospel truth.  He was always quick to correct himself or admit an inaccurate statement when the 00.01 occasion arose. 

 

One of the things I admired most about Richard was that he was brutally honest in his reviews of products in the national modeling magazines.  He was not afraid to call out inaccurate or clunky details on models from manufacturers who should (and probably did) know better.  It was obvious from the sudden disappearance of his reviews in the leading magazines that he had been invited to NOT submit any more material unless he was less blunt about whatever flaws he observed.  It was clear he would not compromise on his principles as his reviews began appearing elsewhere.  Honesty is just one aspect of the legacy he left for all of us.

 

Rest in Peace Richard, and may you encounter no friction - uh, I mean solid bearings on your journey.

 

Mark Rossiter 


Re: Richard Hendrickson

Bill Schneider
 

This is certainly not the way that I wanted to start today off… Like many others I am terribly saddened by Richard’s passing. On a personal level, I will miss the numerous conversations about wine, cars, planes, travel and many other topics that we had in common. On a professional level, I have lost one of my trusted advisors and resources for freight car projects. We have all lost a great man.

 

My condolences and best wishes to Sandra and the family.

 

Bill Schneider

Rapido Trains

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, July 2, 2014 4:50 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Richard Hendrickson

 

 

Vow, very sad news. :-(

My deepest sympathy to his family and friends.

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