Date   

Re: Richard Hendrickson

Ian Cranstone
 

I can't say I knew Richard as well as many on this list, but like many, did benefit from his knowledge and his willingness to share.  On a few occasions I was able to send things back his way, from roster information to occasional photographs to assist his efforts.  Richard was always wonderful to correspond with, and I will miss his many postings, which always amazed me with their frequency and depth of knowledge which they displayed.

Like Tony, I was hoping that he would get started on that tank car book -- which in my case had a particular self interest.  Some years ago, Stafford Swain enlisted both of us in an effort to better understand the Canadian tank car fleet, and we hoped that Richard would explain much about tank cars to us.  I had hoped to ask Richard more questions as I learned more, and sadly I will not get that chance now.

I never did cross paths with Richard - between such distractions as employment, and a busy schedule with my dogs (sledding and agility), I find myself with few opportunities to get to conventions.  We have lost a tremendous asset to the hobby, and a truly inspirational man.  My condolences to his family, and I hope that some way can be found to have his collection of material somehow continue to benefit the hobby as a whole.

Ian Cranstone

Osgoode, Ontario, Canada

lamontc@...

http://freightcars.nakina.net


Re: Refrigerator cars

Allan Smith
 

Reefers for Boxcars


I have conductors lists from the Sierra RR in 1952, they show three reefers used as boxcars. The load cartons. AMRX 50000, PFE 96144 and MDT 5475


Al Smith



Re: ATSF "B" End of FE-22 Autocars

Allan Smith
 

Fe-22 Boxcars


Sunshine made a minikit for a Fe-21 50' single door boxcar. At  the website you can download a PDF file for minikit #22 it has a picture of the end of a Fe-21, it is the none brake wheel end but the Fe-21's didn't have auto doors.


Al Smith


Re: Aberdeen Proving Ground

Mikebrock
 

Denny Anspach...puzzled by being in the same area as greatness and not knowing it...writes [ somewhat out of scope ]:


"H-mmm. Mike reports that he was employed at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in 1964. So was I, and I certainly never ever ever saw him there. Mike: are you sure of your dates? (:-)"

Had Denny taken a good look at the enlisted man's golf course back then he would have likely seen me [ the officer's course was inferior ].


"Were you at the Ballistics Research Laboratory (a world famous laboratory both then, and in history) ?"

Yes. We referred to it as the BRL. I was employed as a weapons systems analyst on...as I recall...the second floor. I arrived on or about March 16,'64. Had an apartment in the infamous Brownstone Farmhouse in Havre de Grace along with about 5 other young BRL guys. I eventually noticed strange signs indicating "snow evacuation" route and I asked what that meant. Finally, NASA called from Kenndy Space Center and, after being assured that there were no snow evacuation routes in Cocoa Beach, I headed south. One thing...the night before I was to leave we had a rather stimulating beer blast. Some of my friends were not even able to get out of bed the next morning. My apartment looked like a bomb had gone off in it. Soon, there was a knock on the door and the manager was there indicating that the new occupant was there and wanted to see the room. After he had a good look he gasped and left. I looked out the window and there was the new renter...a female colonel. I did manage to leave later the next day. I always wondered how my buddies and the colonel got along.


"Historically, and at least until recent years (even now), the vast amount of heavy equipment, i.e. tanks, and up to 16" guns, at Aberdeen arrived by rail. The post had its own railroad directly off the PRR Washington/New York main line to the west, just south of the Aberdeen depot. Although, reportedly there was also once a connection on to the paralleling B&O Baltimore/Philadelphia line, the evidence for this has always been elusive for me, and I have always wondered how B&O shipments -there must have been some- were routed (via PRR at Baltimore, or at Perryville -Port Road)?"

I seem to recall that there was a 2-8-0 operating there during my time there. Incidentally, at times a large caliber gun might undergo testing. I can recall going to an office in a wooden building when I arrived and as I was sitting there waiting, they fired the gun. It was as if someone had slammed the door as hard as they could. I jumped out of the chair...much to everyone else's amusement.

"During WW II, the APG ran its own passenger trains from the PRR Aberdeen depot all the way into the post, several miles. These were to serve commuting workers from Baltmore and environs. The chosen passenger equipment was notable: former PE "blimps", apparently all either trailers or de-motored. The roof top markers were never removed, nor the wide seats. During a rare visit ("pleasure" disguised as "business") in 1966 deep into the post's vast secured area,"


Oddly enough...and I never could figure it out...we were required to have an APG decal on our autos for entry and we carried a badge but we did not use the badge for entry. At Kennedy Space Center we had to show a badge for entry AND exit. The exit need was removed after a few years.

"I was immensely surprised to see a number of the PE car bodies on the ground serving various storage and field office roles. Photography was forbidden, but a connected friend sent me a pile of 8x10s to document what I saw."

The museum there was VERY impressive. Amazingly, there was a shell designed for use in the giant German 800mm railway gun used during the siege of Sevastopol, Russia during WW2. The disappearnce of this gun [ Gustav ] is one of the minor mysteries of WW2. There was also a 128mm multi barrel German anti aircraft gun.

"With the Viet Nam war at full cry, the post railroad was busy with almost daily shipments in and out, most of which I had no idea (covered flat car loads or boxcars). One day during a lunch stroll to the PX, however, I saw on a short cut, two uncovered red-starred Soviet T-34s still on flats, obviously preparatory to unloading. Even judiciously using my own informed sources and security clearances, I was never able to get a hint of where they came from (Egypt, Indonesia, Yugoslavia, or....downright theft?)."

"I have re-visited APG a number of times over the past almost-50 years, but the former easy entry to the post's public areas has now been shut down completely following 9/11. A truly great tank and armor museum was developed in the years following my posting, of which the great line of tanks and other heavy armor about which Mike reports lining the median of the main entrance road was but a very small part"

Oh, yes. In fact, a field was full of various armored vehicles from different countries while I was there..presumably after testing. Probably the Jagd Tiger was the most unusual...given that it had seen combat and was not simply experimental.

"The array of armor from around the world and from all 20thC wars was mind boggling, and in a particular way was sheer manna from heaven for those enamored by Big Heavy Machinery (You know who you are!). The huge German railway gun ("Anzio Annie") was a major attraction.


How did all of this accumulate at Aberdeen? The obvious, and probably the accurate answer would be to consider the fates after testing, and reverse engineering, etc., of all these scores and scores of friendly and enemy armored and other ordnance that passed through the post since its founding in 1917. One can only guess the materiel that ended on the scrap piles.


Reportedly, pursuant to the base closure act of 2010, all of this armor has now been moved from APG to new museum facilities in Fort Lee, VA. Recently, I read that Anzio Annie, after arriving at APG on its own wheels after WWII, has now also departed APG, dismantled, on trucks. As a part of the changes at APG required by the same 2010 act, a like-new, i.e. "mint" US Army EMD SW8 came by free NS transport from Aberdeen to the California State RR Museum's Sacramento Southern RR, where it now serves.


By serendipity these days, I am surprisingly often in and about Aberdeen and environs, a truly interesting place for those with railroad interests. However, APG now is totally off limits, and I an only guess at what it is like these days. Also, by serendipty, I recently lowered my APG Boat Club burgee for the last time and retired it."

One rather amusing aspect of APG while I was there in '64 had to do with the MP unit stationed there. Traffic going through the place was controlled by MPs standing on some kind of support at the center of intersections. One MP would raise his white gloved arm preparatory to giving the "go ahead" or "stop" but you couldn't tell which it would be until he finished executing it. Not wishing to be executed mysef, I was always ready to stop if need be.

Anyhow...wondering how the place survived with Denny and myself there at the same time...and thinking that a bit of humor might be good on this day...

Mike Brock












Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA


Re: Richard

Tom Madden
 

Roger Hinman wrote:

"I hope there will be a moment of silence at this year's "Friends of the Freight Car Dinner."  He was the biggest friend they ever had."


Required wear for the next Naperville and Cocoa Beach: black FOFC shirt with the tank car logo, worn proudly and with respect.


Tom Madden, still can't believe it


In memoriam: Richard Hendrickson

Tony Thompson
 

        I’ve composed a few reflections on the Richard I knew, and have posted them on my blog. The link is below if you’d like to read it. Please feel free to share this link on other lists to which you belong, as I know there are communities beyond this one that would probably be interested.


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Richard

ROGER HINMAN
 

I've been in too much shock to even think about putting down my thoughts in writing, but here goes.

Long before I knew Richard, I admired him as an article writer and was in awe not only of his knowledge but the quantity and quality of his work. Then along came the Westrail kits, of which I was an enthusiastic customer. I  remember sending him a letter of thanks for coming up with this idea that added fresh ideas to the hobby and receiving a very warm reply.  None of the  marketing hype one gets from most manufactures, but just a "glad you enjoyed it.: I still have one those kits I haven't built yet.

I don't believe I attended a Naperville meet until around ten years ago and that was probably the first time I saw him live and it was even better than the articles. I fondly remember the "Billboard car presentation" and the small chat we'd have later about when was the book going to get published. One of the best things to come out of the various RPM meets is they've been well attended by those who used to write all the magazine articles before there were RPM meets and live presentations. 

Then he began attending my presentations and I loved his honesty and his participation; and of course as others have already mentioned he was always offering up all the photos he had of your particular interest. To this day, I am still amazed by how someone with as large a photo collection as he had could find exactly what you were looking for, have it scanned and shipped to you. It felt like you were someone special to him, but he had many of those friends.

I hope there will be a moment of silence at this year's "Friends of the Freight Car Dinner."  He was the biggest friend they ever had. 

Roger Hinnman





photo colleciotn

On Jul 4, 2014, at 2:39 PM, 'Mike Brock' brockm@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Guys,

For those who may not have seen it, I received through the STMFC, the 
following message from Sandra:

Dear Mike,

I've gotten so many cudos to Richard .. it's a shame he isn't here to 
hear them. Thank you for your kind words. And please relay to STMFC my 
thanks. This was so sudden and unexpected that I still don't know what I'm 
doing.
Sandra

Mike Brock



Re: Richard Hendrickson

greg kennelly
 

I first met Richard at the NMRA National Convention in Sacramento in 2011 but we had corresponded for a number of years prior to that.  Along with Ian Cranstone, Richard provided me with immeasurable help in trying to work my way through the intricacies of the British American Oil Company tank car fleet, and the time-frame for the various paint schemes.  While his own modelling was in HO scale, he was sufficiently knowledgeable to be able to clearly indicate what needed to be changed on some available N-scale models in order to create the cars I wanted.  I now need to get myself organized and complete those models to serve as a reminder of his willingness to help.

He will be missed.

RIP Richard, and condolences to Sandra and family.

Greg Kennelly
Burnaby, BC
CANADA



Re: Aberdeen Proving Ground

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

H-mmm.  Mike reports that he was employed at the Aberdeen Proving Ground in 1964. So was I, and I certainly never ever ever saw him there.  Mike: are you sure of your dates?  (:-)

Were you at the Ballistics Research Laboratory (a world famous laboratory both then, and in history) ?  

Historically, and at least until recent years (even now), the vast amount of heavy equipment, i.e. tanks, and up to 16" guns,  at Aberdeen arrived by rail.  The post had its own railroad directly  off the PRR Washington/New York main line to the west, just south of the Aberdeen depot.  Although, reportedly there was also once a connection on to the paralleling B&O Baltimore/Philadelphia line,  the evidence for this has always been elusive for me, and I have always wondered how B&O shipments -there must have been some- were routed (via PRR at Baltimore, or at Perryville  -Port Road)?

During WW II, the APG ran its own passenger trains from the PRR Aberdeen depot all the way into the post, several miles. These were to serve commuting workers from Baltmore and environs.  The chosen passenger equipment was notable: former PE "blimps", apparently all either trailers or de-motored.  The roof top markers were never removed, nor the wide seats.  During a rare visit ("pleasure" disguised as "business") in 1966  deep into the post's vast secured area, I was immensely surprised to see a number of the PE car bodies on the ground serving  various storage and field office roles. Photography was forbidden, but a connected friend sent me a pile of 8x10s to document what I saw.  

With the Viet Nam war at full cry, the post railroad was busy with almost daily shipments in and out, most of which I  had no idea (covered flat car loads or boxcars). One day during a lunch stroll to the PX, however, I saw on a short cut,  two  uncovered red-starred Soviet T-34s still on flats, obviously preparatory to unloading.  Even judiciously using my own informed sources and security clearances, I was never able to get a hint of where they came from (Egypt, Indonesia, Yugoslavia, or....downright theft?). 

I have re-visited APG a number of times over the past  almost-50 years, but the former easy entry to the post's public areas has now been shut down completely following 9/11. A truly great tank and armor museum was developed in the years following my posting, of which the great line of tanks and other heavy armor about which Mike reports lining the median of the main entrance road was but a very small part     The array of armor from around the world and from all 20thC wars was mind boggling, and in a particular way was sheer manna from heaven for those enamored by Big Heavy Machinery (You know who you are!).  The huge German railway gun ("Anzio Annie") was a major attraction.

How did all of this accumulate at Aberdeen?  The obvious, and probably the accurate answer  would be to consider the fates after testing, and reverse engineering, etc., of all these scores and scores of friendly and enemy armored and other ordnance that passed through the post since its founding in 1917. One can only guess the materiel that ended on the scrap piles.

Reportedly, pursuant to the base closure act of 2010, all of this armor has now been moved from APG to new museum facilities in Fort Lee, VA. Recently, I read that Anzio Annie, after arriving at APG on its own wheels after WWII, has now also departed APG, dismantled, on trucks. As a part of the changes at APG required by the same 2010 act, a like-new, i.e. "mint" US Army EMD SW8 came by free NS transport from Aberdeen to the California State RR Museum's Sacramento Southern RR, where it now serves.

By serendipity these days, I am surprisingly often in and about Aberdeen and environs, a truly interesting place for those with railroad interests.  However, APG now is totally off limits, and I an only guess at what it is like these days.  Also, by serendipty, I recently lowered my APG Boat Club burgee for the last time and retired it. 

 



 

Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA






Re: ATSF "B" End of FE-22 Autocars

Allan Smith
 

TIM
The Fe-21's and 22's were rebuilt in 1940. Sunshine has a minikit #22 that shows the B end of a Fe-21 50' single door boxcar. That end should be the same as a Fe-22. If you go to the Sunshine website and download the PDF file you should have a picture of the end.
Al Smith


On Friday, July 4, 2014 4:58 AM, "mjmcguirk@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:


 
I don't know….
maybe that's the reason John seems to get so many models built. 

Marty McGuirk



Re: Richard Hendrickson

tjcataldo
 


i know its too soon but i hope richard collection photo notes ect ect goes The California State Railroad Museum so all
enjoy what richard did

  tom


On Fri, Jul 4, 2014 at 12:02 PM, Anthony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Denny Anspach wrote:

The Big Hole in his productive life, as many of his railroad friends and students might see it, was that he never produced a Magnum Opus, THE FREIGHT CAR BOOK, that would have summarized for posterity the vast amount of data that he accumulated over a lifetime of interest, and which only exists in part in widely scattered publications, most of which were low-volume (even by our standards) and defunct to boot. The high value of such accumulated knowledge and data only gains the high acclaim that posterity requires when it is actually published for wide critical review.   

I believe that it is safe to say that the  person closest to Richard in the sharing of railroad interests in general, and freight car interests in particular, is Tony Thompson; and at some appropriate and respectful time, I would hope that he might weigh in on how Richard would have liked to have made all of this knowledge available to those who follow..


       Denny, you are right in a way, and Richard did talk from time to time about a “big book,” to be all about tank cars. I believe he never really started, being a little daunted by the magnitude of the task, though I often tried to encourage to try a chapter and see if it would get him going. 
        But remember he DID do three books about Santa Fe freight cars, and most of the writing in the book he co-authored with Ed Kaminski, on Billboard Refrigerator Cars.
        I also think he felt that the impact of numerous magazine articles (he published more than 400) was important too, and reached a lot of people.

Tony Thompson




--
Thomas  j Cataldo


Re: Richard Hendrickson

Tony Thompson
 

Denny Anspach wrote:

The Big Hole in his productive life, as many of his railroad friends and students might see it, was that he never produced a Magnum Opus, THE FREIGHT CAR BOOK, that would have summarized for posterity the vast amount of data that he accumulated over a lifetime of interest, and which only exists in part in widely scattered publications, most of which were low-volume (even by our standards) and defunct to boot. The high value of such accumulated knowledge and data only gains the high acclaim that posterity requires when it is actually published for wide critical review.   

I believe that it is safe to say that the  person closest to Richard in the sharing of railroad interests in general, and freight car interests in particular, is Tony Thompson; and at some appropriate and respectful time, I would hope that he might weigh in on how Richard would have liked to have made all of this knowledge available to those who follow..


       Denny, you are right in a way, and Richard did talk from time to time about a “big book,” to be all about tank cars. I believe he never really started, being a little daunted by the magnitude of the task, though I often tried to encourage to try a chapter and see if it would get him going. 
        But remember he DID do three books about Santa Fe freight cars, and most of the writing in the book he co-authored with Ed Kaminski, on Billboard Refrigerator Cars.
        I also think he felt that the impact of numerous magazine articles (he published more than 400) was important too, and reached a lot of people.

Tony Thompson


Richard

Mikebrock
 

Guys,

For those who may not have seen it, I received through the STMFC, the following message from Sandra:

Dear Mike,

I've gotten so many cudos to Richard .. it's a shame he isn't here to hear them. Thank you for your kind words. And please relay to STMFC my thanks. This was so sudden and unexpected that I still don't know what I'm doing.
Sandra

Mike Brock


Re: Richard Hendrickson

Armand Premo
 

Nicely said..A Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, July 04, 2014 10:53 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Richard Hendrickson

 

The greatest tragedy of Richard's death is that at 83, he was still a person of physical vitality (to my knowledge, he still flew aerobatics in his own Citabria airplane), and his undiminished productive mind continued on at a pace that those younger might only envy. He was not ready to yet wind down his life; nor was there any need that I last knew about to actually consider doing so.


The Big Hole in his productive life, as many of his railroad friends and students might see it, was that he never produced a Magnum Opus, THE FREIGHT CAR BOOK, that would have summarized for posterity the vast amount of data that he accumulated over a lifetime of interest, and which only exists in part in widely scattered publications, most of which were low-volume (even by our standards) and defunct to boot. The high value of such accumulated knowledge and data only gains the high acclaim that posterity requires when it is actually published for wide critical review.   Richard always explained to me that he was  reluctant to do so  because railroad interests were only a part of his everyday life; and in his retirement, his devotion to flying and aerobatics (for instance) quite often took precedence, if only because advancing age of pilots and the FAA eventually close at a single point.

I believe that it is safe to say that the  person closest to Richard in the sharing of railroad interests in general, and freight car interests in particular, is Tony Thompson; and at some appropriate and respectful time, I would hope that he might weigh in on how Richard would have liked to have made all of this knowledge available to those who follow.

R.I.P.

Denny



    


Denny S. Anspach MD
Okoboji, IA





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Re: Notes About Richard

Tony Thompson
 

Sandra has been reading them on Richard’s computer.       Tony Thompson


On Jul 3, 2014, at 4:53 PM, gary roe wabashrr@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


I was wondering if there is someone who has been collecting all the notes that have been written about Richard over the last couple days, with the intent to forward them to his family by some means.  I am sure that they would appreciate knowing how much WE appreciated him.  Just a thought.

gary roe
quincy, illinois













Re: Richard Hendrickson

CJ Riley
 

I have hesitated to respond since it could easily be repetitious, but Richard was a great help with the freight car chapter in my book. In the end, I could only think of an expression I have heard:

"When someone dies, a library burns."

Never more appropriate than now. RIP Richard.


CJ Riley
Port Ludlow WA

--------------------------------------------
















































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Re: Richard Hendrickson

rwitt_2000
 

Richard's passing is sad news indeed. Richard was a friend and colleague. He was full of life with much more to give.

He was a trained academic and that is how he treated the study of steam era freight cars.

Richard will be missed.

Bob Witt


Re: WTB Intermountain kit # 40799, AAR 1937 box car

John Barry
 

Found, thanks to your knowledge and generosity I have sourced my core kits.  Now to live fully and get them built for Fresno!  Richard's untimely passing is teaching us another life lesson, The Teacher continues to educate us even in his absence.
 
John Barry


ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights


707-490-9696


3450 Palmer Drive, Suite 4224
Cameron Park, CA 95682


From: "John Barry northbaylines@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC ; "Shake_N_Take@..."
Sent: Friday, July 4, 2014 7:14 AM
Subject: [STMFC] WTB Intermountain kit # 40799, AAR 1937 box car

 
Needed to complete my Bx-28 and Bx-31.  I received a pair of Centralia Car Shops kits from Des Plains, but when I dug into them last night I discovered not only do they have the fixed ends that need to be sawed off, they came with the Viking roof.  All wrong for the ATSF cars.  I'll have to save them for another day.  This will be my first serious kitbash and I'm not quite up to whacking the ends off on my first go.  Andy Carlson has some on order, but has been told they will ship "some time" which helps neither of us.

Any one have one or two of the Intermountain 40799 you are willing to part with?  I would like to have the build for the ATSFRRH&MS convention in Fresno, but am seriously running out of time.  Also am willing to do a production position swap as they do in the airline industry and purchase you a future replacement for a kit now.



 
John Barry


ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights


707-490-9696


3450 Palmer Drive, Suite 4224
Cameron Park, CA 95682



Re: Richard Hendrickson

MARK OLSTYN
 

I met Richard early on at Naperville and had the the privilege to talk with him a couple of times. He truly was an exceptional person. The depth of his knowledge was amazing. As much as his loss to the modeling world is, is it possible to create a compendium of all the railroading comments he made to this list and others who received information from him, with the real facts according to Richard Hendrickson. An awful lot of railroad knowledge passed with him and we'll never be able to ask him any more questions. Could this knowledge be compiled some how before it's lost for all time? It would be a great tribute to him.
                                                                                                    Mark Olstyn
                                                                                                    Grosse Pointe Park, MI    


Re: Commemorative Richard Hendrickson Built

jon miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 7/4/2014 6:27 AM, Charlie Duckworth omahaduck@... [STMFC] wrote:
 Was there a 'favorite' Santa Fe car of his he worked on with the manufacturers to produce or one he mentioned during his conversations with fellow ATSF modelers?   If not, I'll go with the Westerfield ATSF Bx-11 as my recommendation.

    I would suggest the Bx-3 as Richard was the one who first saw the masters and suggested they go to Al.

-- 

Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

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