Date   

Reading Ventilated Boxcar (was Re: Pressed Steel Car)

Benjamin Hom
 

Al Brown wrote:
"So the Reading had vent boxes, back in the day. Who'd have thought it?"


Not that surprising. The PRR rostered small numbers of Class XM and XL produce boxcars equipped with ventilators, though they lacked the second screened door.  Westerfield offers them in HO scale resin:
https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/product_info.php?cPath=26&products_id=139
https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/product_info.php?cPath=12&products_id=34

NYC&HR also had a total of 1300 produce boxcars built in 1902, 1903 (no lot #s), and 1910 (Lot 242-P).  The diagram doesn't indicate if these cars had second doors, but appears to show roof hatches and ventilation. 
http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/lot-138700.jpg

Model Railroader ran plans in Gordon Odegard's "Philadelphia & Reading Ventilated Boxcar, 1901-1930's" in the July 1986 issue.


Ben Hom


Re: odd US military depressed center flat car

caboose9792@...
 

I leafed though the 1953 AAR book of loading diagrams for military equipment in open top cars and didn't see any diagrams for depressed center car loading and there is a note "Well hole and depressed center cars must not be used without special permission from the railroads". I would suspect that shipping anything "standard use" would go on a strait deck car. Everything from tanks to uncrated motorcycles, buoys to barges, even about a half dozen ways to load jeeps all have loading diagrams for flats and gons.
 
Mark Rickert
 

In a message dated 7/1/2014 9:12:29 A.M. Central Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:

I don't ever remember seeing one of the tanks loaded on a drop-center flat.

Marty McGuirk


Re: Color of Paper Used to Seal doors for Grain Shipments

Bill Welch
 

Clark, thank you for help me to clarify. Yes I am talking about the tape like stuff and no I am not certain the contents were grain. I could be showing my ignorance.

Bill Welch


Re: Pressed Steel Car

Brian Carlson
 

Southern New Jersey had a lot of agriculture at one time. Don't forget the Reading went to Jersey too. It wasn't just anthracite in Pa. There was a nice article in the keystone a few back about all the agriculture products the Pennsy carried to the northeast from Delmarvia. 


On Jul 6, 2014, at 8:56 PM, "abrown@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

So the Reading had vent boxes, back in the day. Who'd have thought it? Wow.

AL B.


Re: Pressed Steel Car

earlyrail
 

Poking through Eric's amazing treasure trove, I came across an AAR car code I'd never heard of, and that isn't listed in my 1/1943 ORER: XV. What is this?

(P&R 19885-19924, built 1/1901: p 11 in the book. There may be more.).

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.
From a 1916 ORER
"XV - Box Car, Ventilated Similar to ordinary box, only haveing ventilation, and suitable for the transportation of produce and othe foodstuffs not needing refrigeration."

just for further info

"VS - Standard Ventilator. A car equipped with insulation, including insulated side, end and top openings, and ventilating deices without ice tanks."

There is a difference

Howard Garner



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Re: Pressed Steel Car

al_brown03
 

So the Reading had vent boxes, back in the day. Who'd have thought it? Wow.

AL B.


Re: Pressed Steel Car

Ian Cranstone
 


On 2014-07-06, at 8:31 PM, abrown@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Poking through Eric's amazing treasure trove, I came across an AAR car code I'd never heard of, and that isn't listed in my 1/1943 ORER: XV. What is this?

(P&R 19885-19924, built 1/1901: p 11 in the book. There may be more.).

As listed in the ORER from at least 1917 to 1929:

Box Car, Ventilated. Similar to ordinary box, only having ventilation, and suitable for the transportation of produce or other foodstuffs not needing refrigeration.


Re: Pressed Steel Car

Tony Thompson
 

Al Brown wrote:

 

Poking through Eric's amazing treasure trove, I came across an AAR car code I'd never heard of, and that isn't listed in my 1/1943 ORER: XV. What is this?

(P&R 19885-19924, built 1/1901: p 11 in the book. There may be more.).


    Sounds like an ventilated box car, and in my 1929 ORER, that is what is shown. After WW II, that would be changed to AAR Class VA. 

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Color of Paper Used to Seal doors for Grain Shipments

riverman_vt@...
 

    Dittoo that about teh Signode heavy paper grain doors. The first ones I ever saw

had some sort of roughtly 1/2 in. metal strapping to give them additional strength

with one placed near the bottom of teh door opening, another in the middle and one

a bit below the mark beside the door indicating how high the particular type of

grain could be loaded, given its volumetric density. Later on these straps evolved

into the sort of fiber based strapping often seen in such uses today. The color of

those that I saw were the typical brown of kraft paper as opposed to the lighter

color of manila folders. Actually I thought that Manila Folders was the intended

new name for the Boston Red Flops, as my father always refered to the team,

once they move to the Phillipines!

 

Cordially, Don Valentine

 


 


Re: Pressed Steel Car

al_brown03
 

Poking through Eric's amazing treasure trove, I came across an AAR car code I'd never heard of, and that isn't listed in my 1/1943 ORER: XV. What is this?

(P&R 19885-19924, built 1/1901: p 11 in the book. There may be more.).

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Color of Paper Used to Seal doors for Grain Shipments

Tim O'Connor
 

This is the Jaeger paper seen from the interior side --
http://steamerafreightcars.com/modeling/models/oconnor/dssa17065main.html

The black bands are 1/64 Chartpak tape, representing steel bands.
I'd seen a prototype photo somewhere that showed the paper doors
were sometimes secured with steel bands.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Tread on lateral roof walks on box cars

Tim O'Connor
 


Evidently the Alan Wood Steel Co held the patent for diamond tread plate -- period. I never knew that
but it makes sense that someone would have invented and patented tread plate. Using it to make running
boards was basically an afterthought...

Tim O'


 I believe it is called "Alan Wood Super Diamond". Alan Wood was a steel mill in Conshohocken, PA presumably served by both the
  RDG and PRR. For an approximation, try rubbing copper foil on top of a fine screen and then gluing or soldering to a core of some sort.
  Eric N.


Re: Color of Paper Used to Seal doors for Grain Shipments

Clark Propst
 

Bill, are you talking about the tape-like stuff that covered the door edge seams on the outside of the car? If so, are you sure the cars contained grain?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Alan wood running boards (was Tread on lateral roof walks)

Tim O'Connor
 

I don't think the Alan Wood running boards were 'integral' with
the roof, i.e. I don't think they formed part of the roof itself.

Here is the 1940 patent for the Alan Wood box car running boards, which
is perforated steel tread plate.

http://www.google.com/patents/US2279756

And here is the 1930 patent for the Alan Wood tank car running boards,
also perforated steel tread plate.

http://www.google.com/patents/US1889605

Tim O'Connor


Re: Rolling my own, thanks to Bill Welch

Clark Propst
 

Tim, I have no MP decals nor do I have a use for them. The model I built will become Des Moines and Central Iowa.
 
A decal source would be needed if Charlie feels the model is worth offering to those in need.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Decal order

Benjamin Scanlon
 

I cannot work out how to reply individually anymore on Yahoo but I have been waiting for an order seven months now. 

 

Regards

 

Ben Scanlon


Re: Color of Paper Used to Seal doors for Grain Shipments

npin53
 

I have a color picture of a Wilson reefer with the paper doors.  The paper is the same color as the tape holding it on, except glossy or shiny.  Tape appears to be the wide, tan masking type.  It is in one of the NP color guide books, and have the page scanned if anyone is really interested.

I know the paper was used to seal doors on cars carrying flour.  It would also be stapled to the inside of stock cars to protect hogs during cold weather.

Aaron Gjermundson


Richard Hendrickson as a person

dgconnery@...
 

Like so many have already related, Richard had a huge impact on my freight car modeling. I expect at least 1/3 of all the freight cars on my layout have a connection to Richard: Westrail kits, cars based on articles Richard wrote, cars I purchased from him when he was thinning his inventory or kits he contributed to. When I am modeling a freight car, in my mind Richard is looking over my shoulder and as I work through the project I find myself explaining to this image of him why I am doing things the way I am.


But I will always primarily remember Richard for the exceptional human qualities he exhibited. I never knew him to pass work off onto others, what ever he did he did with quality and completeness and he seemed to always see things as if through the eyes of those around him. A couple of examples:


A number of years ago Richard was unhappy with the quality of the photo coverage of the annual NMRA Region contest in the regional Newsletter. Rather than complain, he suggested he would take photos of top contest entries. For several years Richard showed up at the Regional Convention with all his photo gear and a small diorama for photographing track equipment. A week or two after the convention an envelop would show up with beautiful B&W photos of all the top models in the contest room (not just the freight cars), all apparently the product of Richard's darkroom. (This was in the era before digital, when pages would be pasted-up in hard copy and sent off to the printer.)


Several times I went to Richard to get his ideas on a Convention Car that was prototypically correct and fit the Convention theme. Not only did he come up with ideas, but once we had agreed on a good candidate, he contacted the manufacturer, providing them with photos and number series, all with out anyone asking him to take on this added responsibility.


One stormy night Richard and I bumped into each other at the baggage claim area in Madison, Wisc. on our way to an NMRA convention. We had apparently both been on the same hop from Chicago but had not noticed each other during boarding. He asked how I was getting to my hotel and replied I was going to grab a cab and he quickly said he had a rental car and would be happy to drop me off at my hotel, although it was nowhere near where he was staying..


Richard, I expect you will long be looking over my shoulder as I model but most of all I will remember you as an exceptionally fine human being.


Dave Connery

San Ramon, CA


Re: Tread on lateral roof walks on box cars

Tony Thompson
 

Brian Carlson wrote:

Actually Archer has tread plate in various scales. If the Alan Wood was a specific pattern different than what they offer they might even create the sheet if you ask them and describe the market. Tony Thompson seems to have their ear. 

      The only reason I have ANY of their ear is because I have sent suggestions, complete with dimensional data, for their use. My impression is that they are most open to suggestions. Just drop them an email. They do already make a "diamond tread plate" decal.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Color of Paper Used to Seal doors for Grain Shipments

lstt100
 

Bill,

Thanks Doug for reference to my article.  I also presented at RMJ in Naperville in 2006 about grain handling and 1992 on grain doors.

Prior to 1911, grain was retained by loose lumber and various types of doors.  A "Standard Temporary Grain Door, wooden, was developed and approved for use in November 1911.  During November 1934 CB&Q, UP, MP, ATSF and MILW made further revisions to the AAR Standard Temporary grain door.  At this time WWIB took over the coopering, accounting and reclaiming of wooden grain doors for member railroads.  AAR Standard Grain Door was approved for use in November 1938. 

Keep in mind first paper grain doors were developed by Signode Corp in 1948, by Feb 1949 over 250,000 carloads of bulk commodities had been shipped using paper grain doors.  Ford Grain Door, later International Stanley Co., entered paper grain door market in mid-50's.  Later Omni Corp and Menasha entered market with their own paper grain doors which post date the list.

Paper grain doors were in use during the time list is covering, however, shippers did not like them account the high percentage of leaking grain claims involved with the use of the doors.  Given a choice, most elevators preferred the wooden grain doors.  Unlike wooden grain doors, paper grain doors were a one time use item. 

Wooden grain doors were considered railroad property and most were stenciled with the owning railroads initials.  This allow doors to be reclaimed by WWIB and shipped back to owning carriers for reuse.

Dan Holbrook

66861 - 66880 of 192652