Date   

NYC 255000-256749, Lot 289B

golden1014
 

Gentlemen,

At St. Louis RPM I bought one of F&C's NYC Lot 289B box cars.  According the the CASO site the car is a 36-foot steel underframe box car, series 255000-256749, built 1912, and were carreid on the roster until 1953. 

I was wondering if anyone has any photos of the cars you could send along?  I looked for a photo at all the photo dealers at the meet but couldn't find one, and there is not one on the CASO site.  

Neat little model, and easy build too.  Thanks for the help!

John

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL



PRR 1954 & 1958 Freight Rosters

John Sykes III
 

Hey guize!

Just uploaded a roster of PRR freight equipment from the 1954 & 1958 ORER in Excel spreadsheet format.  Now if you want to know how many hoppers were lost of gained in that timeframe, it's a piece of cake.  I did not include as much info in this roster as the DL&W* and Erie rosters I previously posted since there is already a lot of info on line, particularly the diagrams on Rob Schoenberg's great website and Jerry Britton's Keystone crossings.  Also, production of many PRR classes covered up to a decade or more, so it is sometimes difficult to tell exactly when a specific car was built.  Have fun and if you see any major issues, let me know.  I will try to correct them as warranted.


-- John


* Corrected/improved version of DL&W roster should be up in a day or two at the max.


New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.


File : /Freight Car Rosters/PRR_1954-1958_Freight_Roster.xls
Uploaded by : johnsykesiii <johnsykesiii@yahoo.com>
Description : PRR roster from 1954 & 1958 ORER w/some added info.


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/Freight%20Car%20Rosters/PRR_1954-1958_Freight_Roster.xls


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398


Regards,


johnsykesiii <johnsykesiii@yahoo.com>


Re: NC&STL XM 32 (NOT HM 32) rebuilds

Ray Breyer
 

Inward rib Hutchins ends, along with inward 7/7 rib and Vulcans,  have been CAD drawn and printed by Shapeways. They're not commercially available (yet).
 
Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL

From: "Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC]"
To: "STMFC@..."
Sent: Tuesday, August 19, 2014 9:59 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: NC&STL XM 32 (NOT HM 32) rebuilds

Marty McGuirk wrote:
"You could build your own. The trickiest part to fabricate will be the ends. I think someone used to make them (John Greene at Bethlehem Car Works, maybe????)"
 
Westerfield offers the Hutchins ends from their Southern Class SU boxcar kits, but the inverse Hutchins ends aren't availables AFAIK.  Andy Clermont fabricated them from styrene for D&H 36 ft DS boxcar kibashes from the MDC kit years ago (see John Nehrich's "D&H's 1907 Wooden Boxcars" in the December 1987 issue of RMC) - Archer rivets would make this approach far more refined than Andy's efforts 27(!) years ago.






 
"If you can't locate separate ends or the Sunshine kit suggest using a similar car - like the Funaro 3406 D&H boxcar with Reverse Hutchins Ends as a starting point. The Funaro kits are going to be far easier to source than the Sunshine Model."

Keep your eyes open - Funaro kits are readily available on the open market, and you can often get Funaro kits below list price directly from him at shows if you buy in quantity.
http://www.fandckits.com/HOFreight/3400.html

 
 
Ben Hom


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Posted by: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
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Re: NC&STL XM 32 (not HM 32) rebuilds

Allan Smith
 

Steam Era Freight Car Reference  Manual Volume One Box & Automobile Cars  from Speedwitch Media.

Al Smith


On Monday, August 18, 2014 9:20 PM, "pburr47@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Sorry, I'm kind of new to all this...I don't recognize "SEFCRM" and can't find through Google. I assume it's Steam Era Freight Car something, of course. If anyone has one of the Sunshine kits that they would be willing to sell, please let me know.



time to rethink modeling

ed_mines
 

 I had a side buckle when I put decal setting solution on an Ambroid PRR X23 box car.

 

I was heart broken. A beautiful model for the era.

 

I always sealed wood after that.

 

Ed Mines


new lumber load kit from Owl Mountain

Tony Thompson
 

Owl Mountain Models has just released a superb new kit for flat car lumber loads. I will be doing a brief review of the kit in the Southern Pacific Society magazine, _Trainline_ in the upcoming issue, but a more extensive write-up has been posted to my blog. If you're interested it's at this link:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2014/08/open-car-loads-lumber-from-owl-mountain.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


sale of Hendrickson kits

Tony Thompson
 

As mentioned in my original email, the deadline for bids is this Thursday at noon. Anyone who might have lost my list of the kits on sale, please contact me OFF list. I will have another batch of kits to offer on Friday.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: [citrusmodeling] Moderator’s Warning: Bogus Yahoo Mail Message

Scott H. Haycock
 

I got one of these with the Bank of America logo on it. It looked perfectly legit; except I have no accounts there...

Scott Haycock


 

SCAM ALERT**********BEWARE***********


Begin forwarded message:




[citrusmodeling] Moderator’s Warning: Bogus Yahoo Mail Message

clipper841@att.net <clipper841@...>
 

SCAM ALERT**********BEWARE***********

Begin forwarded message:

From: "thecitrusbelt@... [citrusmodeling]" <citrusmodeling@...>
Date: August 19, 2014 7:48:12 AM PDT
Subject: [citrusmodeling] Moderator’s Warning: Bogus Yahoo Mail Message

 


Some of you may have received a message, supposedly from Yahoo, that reads:

 


“These is to inform you that there was an attempt to log in your account from an unrecognized location which we blocked. We kindly mandate that you Upgrade the security of your mail.”

 


Do not respond to this e-mail by giving the sender your personal Yahoo account information.  The sender is attempting to steal your account information.

 


Bob Chaparro

Moderator





Re: Well you know it's time to stop modeling for the night when...

paul.doggett2472@...
 

Hi All

         Yes been there done that and got the T-shirt

Paul Doggett UK


Re: Well you know it's time to stop modeling for the night when...

albyrno
 

 I re-motored a brass steam loco,put on track to test and it had a short.I removed boiler and it no longer had a short.After looking for a boiler to frame,headlight wiring,brake shoes contacting drivers or motor issue creating short,which I had spent hours looking for.I discovered that I had put the lead truck upside down when I reassembled loco the first time.
           Alan


Re: NC&STL XM 32 (NOT HM 32) rebuilds

Marty McGuirk
 

Update - BCW made a "reverse" Creco door - not an end AFAIK.

I must have been thinking of the Westerfield end, which is not suitable for the NC XMs since it was an "outy" and not an "inny"....

 


Re: NC&STL XM 32 (NOT HM 32) rebuilds

Benjamin Hom
 

Marty McGuirk wrote:
"You could build your own. The trickiest part to fabricate will be the ends. I think someone used to make them (John Greene at Bethlehem Car Works, maybe????)"
 
Westerfield offers the Hutchins ends from their Southern Class SU boxcar kits, but the inverse Hutchins ends aren't availables AFAIK.  Andy Clermont fabricated them from styrene for D&H 36 ft DS boxcar kibashes from the MDC kit years ago (see John Nehrich's "D&H's 1907 Wooden Boxcars" in the December 1987 issue of RMC) - Archer rivets would make this approach far more refined than Andy's efforts 27(!) years ago.



 
"If you can't locate separate ends or the Sunshine kit suggest using a similar car - like the Funaro 3406 D&H boxcar with Reverse Hutchins Ends as a starting point. The Funaro kits are going to be far easier to source than the Sunshine Model."
Keep your eyes open - Funaro kits are readily available on the open market, and you can often get Funaro kits below list price directly from him at shows if you buy in quantity.
http://www.fandckits.com/HOFreight/3400.html

 
 
Ben Hom


Re: NC&STL XM 32 (not HM 32) rebuilds

Marty McGuirk
 

Peter,

I believe the reference is to Steam Era Freight Cars Reference Manual, Volume One: Box & Automobile Cars, by Ted Culotta.

Excellent overview of the history (with photos) of steam era freight cars - a must have for prototype modelers interested in the mid- to late steam era.

Steam Era Freight Cars Reference Manual, Volume One | Speedwitch Media

Marty McGuirk

 


Re: CAD library

Dennis Storzek
 

---In STMFC@..., <nvrr49@...> wrote :

"...  The newest SLA printer from Kudo 3D has a resolution of 37 microns, with the possibility of adjusting it down to 25 microns..."

Which is 1000 dpi, give or take a few pixels... each pixel being .001 across.
.
Interestingly, the price, seems to be heading steeply downward, but the resolution isn't improving all that much. This appears to be the same DLP technology that has been available from Envision Tech (Perfactory), for several years now, with a $70k price tag. Last year I explored the Asiga offering; same specs in a $7000 machine. Now this one is asking $3000. Be interesting to see what the ultimate life of these machines is.
.
IOne nice thing about this technology is it can apparently deal with overhanging features without building separate wax  support structures; the only support is each disjoined starting point needs it's own stem from the machine platen, but these are somewhat ahin to runners and gates on injection molded parts, and most modelers can deal with that.
.
The problem is, I don't want to own the machine, just use the service. While I don't have any particular love for Shapeways, they do have an easy to deal with business model, and apparently a rather large user base to keep the lights on. I've been hoping that when something that offers greater resolution comes along, that Shapeways will add thet to the multiple processes they already run. Of course, they would have to price it at a point where people would use it, but lower capital costs for the machines would help trim the price.
.
Dennis  Storzek


Re: NC&STL HM 32 rebuilds

Marty McGuirk
 

Peter,

Here's the link to the Sunshine Models Flyer on the NC XM-32s -

http://sunshinekits.com/sunimages/sun97a.pdf

 

The kits show up from time from time on eBay.

 

You could build your own. The trickiest part to fabricate will be the ends. I think someone used to make them (John Greene at Bethlehem Car Works, maybe????)

If you can't locate separate ends or the Sunshine kit suggest using a similar car - like the Funaro 3406 D&H boxcar with Reverse Hutchins Ends as a starting point.

The Funaro kits are going to be far easier to source than the Sunshine Model.

Glad to see you want some legit cars to put behind that Dixie!

Marty McGuirk


Re: LCL Load ca. 1900

riverman_vt@...
 

   Was this not a question that was left up to the owning road, or at least the road that originally

ordered the cars? I don't ever recall seeing a rule that cut levers had to extend to both sides of

the car. Those on which they extend only to one side always seem to be set up so that the end

to the right is always the one with the cut lever. Thus there should be no problem as at least

one of the two cars where uncoupling would be done would have a cut lever available.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine


 


Re: CAD library

Rod Miller
 

On 8/18/14, 8:40 PM, nvrr49@yahoo.com [STMFC] wrote:
I am glad Tom took the time to write all this up. I have 3d printed hundreds
of items, and used a couple different printers. Sharing files between
different printers does not work, in fact I have had to do complete redesigns
because of a software upgrade on a printer. It was worth it, the software
upgrade made the finished product that much better. Any files shared would
still need to be edited to fit particular printers. It can be done, but it
is not as easy as just grabbing a bunch of part files and assuming they will
work in any given printer. The newest SLA printer from Kudo 3D has a
resolution of 37 microns, with the possibility of adjusting it down to 25
microns. If it shows up on time, I will have examples in clinics at the
Amherst Show. Kent Hurley nvrr49.blogspot.com ---In STMFC@yahoogroups.com,
<pullmanboss@...> wrote : Some notes from the real world…

When you get to your late 70s your list of “not in my lifetime” possibilities
is considerably longer than it is for you youngsters in your 60s. That
certainly colors my view of 3D printing and libraries of CAD files. So what
follows is the view of someone more likely to receive a pacemaker than a 3D
printed Pacemaker boxcar in the foreseeable future.

I won’t discuss 3D printers except for how they affect the design process. We
had an extended thread on 3D printers in July 2013 which may be worth
reviewing.

The two printing processes I use the most are stereolithography and mutltijet
modeling. Ross (no last name) mentioned 3D Systems’ Viper high resolution SLA
(stereolithography) machine. Shapeways’ FD and FUD (frosted detail and
frosted ultra detail) parts are created on 3D Systems’ even higher resolution
MJM (multijet modeling) printers. SLA builds by drawing the image of each
layer on the surface of a UV curable liquid resin. It’s a vector process. In
hi-res mode the laser beam is 0.002” dia, the layers are 0.002” thick, and
the surfaces are the smoothest of any 3D printing process, but it can’t do
parts with overhanging features. MJM printing is a raster process (think 3D
inkjet printing), with resolution of 600 x 600 DPI (and increasing) and
layers less than 0.001” thick. It’s faster and less expensive than SLA, the
surfaces are slightly textured and it can handle overhanging features.
Surface texture is no big deal for 1:1 objects, but it can be for our
miniatures.

A good designer has to be familiar with the capabilities of the manufacturing
process he’s designing for. By their nature, stereolithography underbuilds
features slightly, and MJM machines overbuild by a similar amount. Not a
factor unless you’re designing things like ¾” dia rivet heads in HO. For SLA
designs I increase the head diameter by 1/8”; for MJM designs I decrease it
by the same amount. It may seem like no big deal, 1/8” in HO is just under
0.0015”. But if I use the same design file to print an uncompensated ¾” rivet
head in each process, the difference in the printed rivets (5/8” SLA vs.
7/8” MJM) is 40% and is very noticeable. Prototype rivet heads are not full
hemispheres, but to get all the rivets to print properly and be visible
through a couple of coats of paint, I make them full hemispheric domes and
put each on a 1/8” riser. If a car uses several different sizes of rivets,
and you want to represent the visual differences, it may be necessary to
design the smallest ones so they print reliably, even if that makes them
larger that they should be, and increase the other sizes accordingly. In HO I
know if I want to represent a series of surfaces that are offset from one
another, like a window frame, or a rivet batten on a car side, the layers
must be separated by at least 3/8” for the layering to be noticeable. In
other words, it helps if you can apply the precision touch of an engineering
designer with the eye of an artist.

So there we require two different design files for a single part, depending
on what process will be used to print it. For HO. But those HO rivets won’t
print if reduced to N scale, and they are probably too large if printed in O
scale. The differences in the level of detail required for the various scales
is what tempers my enthusiasm for a CAD library. Ignoring the design audit
issue, a printer will try to print everything in the design file, but parts
smaller than the resolution limit of the printer will be blobs on the
surface. So a highly detailed design file that prints gangbuster parts in O
scale will have to be dumbed down considerably for the smaller scales. And
vice-versa. Too many variables for this old mind to process.

Finally, Dennis mentioned that I “gamed” Shapeways’ process to get good parts
by ganging three parts facing in different directions. It’s actually five
different directions, as shown here: www.pullmanproject.com/Gaming.jpg
http://www.pullmanproject.com/Gaming.jpg

Those are left- and right-handed versions of compressor boxes used on
passenger cars with B&O-style York air conditioning. The plate is
approximately 3” x 3” and cost $54 from Shapeways. Too expensive for parts to
use as-is, but just fine for resin casting masters. Shapeways built the plate
on edge and I did get two good parts. But only two.

Nothing is as simple or as straightforward as it seems.

Tom Madden
I have a little different view of the library than it being a
collection of print-ready files (as implied by the 1st para.
above).

My experience is limited to AutoCad's Mechanical Desktop and
a little Solidworks. While working in MDT, if, say a certain
size counter bored hole was needed for the part, one could
access a library of standard parts, find the appropriate hole,
and add it to
the drawing. When that completed drawing was printed, the
source of the hole had been long lost.

So for say, drawing a steam loco driver center, if there
were libraries of rims, spokes, counterweights, axle
bosses with different crank pin offsets for different strokes,
one could assemble those parts into a driver center. All
parts nominally would 1:1, the center would be assembled
1:1, then scaled by 1/48 or 1/87 or whatever to produce
the size part wanted. Of course I oversimplify, as finishing
work such as adding fillets etc. would be needed to "clean
up" the drawing of the center, but none of that work in
this example would require drawing new parts of the center,
all those parts would have come from a library.

AFIK there are standardized formats for library parts, e.g.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6fN2wHDYHs
A little searching will turn many more examples.

So what I was suggesting for NMRA consideration was drawing
parts libraries, e.g., reefer hinges, corner steps. I realize
that many of these items may already exist as parts of moldings
in HO scale, but in O scale in which I model, there is a
paucity of individual detail parts. If the NMRA-managed
libraries were all in a standard format it would seem that
many would find use for the parts therein.
--
Rod Miller
Handcraftsman
===
Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale West / S West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2015 Meet is Feb 5 - 7
http://www.rodmiller.com | http://www.oscalewest.com


Re: NC&STL XM 32 (not HM 32) rebuilds

pburr47@...
 

Sorry, I'm kind of new to all this...I don't recognize "SEFCRM" and can't find through Google. I assume it's Steam Era Freight Car something, of course. If anyone has one of the Sunshine kits that they would be willing to sell, please let me know.

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