Date   

Re: Lights out at the "Pub"

arved_grass
 

Agreed. I'd hoped Carstens would publish the "Essential Freight Car" series as a book. Hopefully someone will take over and do it, but I'm not holding my breath.

Many of the issues with the series were no longer available from Carstens as back-issues, and have "dried up" at used magazine and book vendors like Railpub.com.
------------------------
Arved Grass
Fleming Island, Florida

--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 8/22/14, Tom Baker bakert@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Fwd: Lights out at the "Pub"
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, August 22, 2014, 1:46 PM


 









Very sad! I had hope that RMC could stage a
comeback. I appreciated

the series of articles by Ted Culotta and the tips on
modeling

structures. Now whither?



Tom Baker

> Posted by: Tony Thompson
<tony@...>

> ------------------------------------

>

>

> ------------------------------------

>

> Yahoo Groups Links

>

>

>

>



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Re: Lights out at the "Pub"

Tim O'Connor
 

Maybe Mr. Bill Schaumburg (a fixture at RPM meets) will continue
with some other RPM enterprise?

Think of how the retail world has changed -- "department stores" have
been replaced by big box discounters and specialty stores. Publications
like MR and RMC are kind of the equivalent of dept stores, while RPCYC
and the Speedwitch pubs are the equivalent of specialty stores. Most
STMFC'ers probably want to get straight to the RPM stuff and don't want
to have to walk past aisles of baby clothes, shoes and household goods
to reach the resin kits and superdetail parts!

One chapter ends, and another begins.

Tim O'Connor

No comment need be added. What a shock and a shame. Tony Thompson

Begin forwarded message:

From: Bill Schaumburg <bills@...>
Date: August 22, 2014 9:31:29 AM PDT
Subject: Lights out at the "Pub"

Colleagues,

It has been a great run and it is lights out at Carstens Pub by 5:00
p.m. I will close out my term here of nearly 38 years with the
following from Doug Adams, who wrote it around the time I came to RMC:

"So Long, and Thanks for all the fish."

Bill Schaumburg


Re: CAD library

Dave Nelson
 

That’s been The Problem with sharing in the Train Sim world.  People seem to have a highly inflated opinion of the value of their work and will get themselves twisted into knots of outrageous indignation that something of theirs might wind up in a payware product, somewhere in the world.  And so they write out silly EULA’s to preetn anybody from doing almost anything with their stuff… and 5 years later they leave the hobby.

 

I can understand pride and possessiveness over one’s own creations, having held that point of view myself at one time.

 

However, now that I am past 60 my attitude about such things has changed: I’d rather give it all away and see it put to use rather than hoard the source files and have the disc files trashed when I’m pushing up the daisies.  So now I’d much rather see my name in the credits as having contributed to  a fine product from someone else than to see my requested paypay payment of a couple  of bucks hardly ever used.

 

YMMV… but do think about it: Which is more important -- You getting a few bucks?  Or the hobby getting better?

 

Dave Nelson

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 20, 2014 9:38 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: CAD library

 

and of course, everyone who contributes would feel that the commercial guys were using their work without compensation, whether that was true or not.
.
This could get interesting.
.
Dennis Storzek

 


Re: CAD library

Dave Nelson
 

I’ve been doing 3D Cad for rail sims for almost 10 years now, starting from complete ignorance to being quite proficient in Sketchup.   I have a library of components that I often reach for so I think I might have something useful to contribute to this discussion:

 

First, You do need to know about manufacturing tolerances but don’t get hung up on how the components in the library will become physical objects in your hands.  Shapeways is here today but tomorrow there might be three other superior service companies, each of whom do things differently.   Given that, my recommendation is the 3D models should be done 12 inches to the foot and cataloged in your library as such.  When somebody wants a model, they get a copy and make any and all adjustments for scale and manufacturability then.  If that modified model goes back into the library it should do so as having been scaled and/or modified for manufacturability by XYZ Company.

 

Second, experience will show only a few things can be reused w/o further adjustments.  Consider your basic Z bar used on STMFC: It’s a standard profile but not a standard length.  Actual length and where the holes get drilled for those standard sized carriage bolts will vary from car to car and so it’s better for the master model to be a very short Z Bar and expect all individual modelers to stretch it out to and apply those bolts to be correct for the one car.  Really now, what’s the use of cataloging a 9ft, 10.5” Z bar w/ bolts when what you want is 9.25 inches shorter?  The same thing is true for car ends – you need the corner done right, the transition from the corner to the standard corrugation done right… but the length of the standard corrugation is specific to the width of the car, right?  So the end user should do that last step.  Ditto for door corrugations.  The same issue applies to car roofs only it is the slope that needs to be set by the final modeler as slope depends on the width of the car.

 

With that in mind you’ll find that having a library of period shape standards per the specs of various US Steel firms to be very useful – C channels, Z bars and so on.  Get a 10” C channel section and pull it out to the correct length for you side sill, and so on.

 

Crossbearers etc., are a tiny bit more problematic as you need to move more points to pull the length out to fit your car but that’s an issue to understand w/ your CAD tool and not an inherent problem with a library.

 

That said, there is still a great need for custom work… maybe not so much w/ STMFC but if things branch out into architectural models it’s a whole ‘nuther set of issues and components.

 

Castings almost always turn out to be a one-of tho I suppose you can fake it w/o great loss… one Miner Door Lock from the 40’s looks like most.  Striker castings are, in my experience, a royal PITA but again it might be that having one is good enough for everyone.

 

Pipes and bars are trivial to create so there really is little need to catalog those in a library.  OTOH an assembly of such items would be useful so grab irons, ladder steps and styles, and any number of side sill steps should go into a library.  Ditto for typical brake equipment.

 

Hope this is of some use.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 20, 2014 9:38 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: CAD library

 


Most useful to the modeler would be to have a library of shareware solid models in one of the common CAD interchange formats; DXF, IGES, or STEP. Most CAD software will import at least one of these formats, and the solid models become available for unlimited modification, with a new STL file exported only for printing. This could allow good parts to get better; multiple variations could become available because only the work to do the modification need be invested, rather than modeling the entire part all over again. On the other hand, good parts may become corrupted, as people make changes without checking their data, and of course, everyone who contributes would feel that the commercial guys were using their work without compensation, whether that was true or not.
.
This could get interesting.
.
Dennis Storzek

 


Re: Lights out at the "Pub"

ku0a@...
 

Carsten's demise is doubly troubling to me because I had a paid subscription through June 2017. I guess I've lost that money.

Nelson Moyer


Re: second sale of Hendrickson kits

Tony Thompson
 

      I've been asked to mention the range of bids on the first batch of kits. Successful bids ranged from $36 to $100, with most in the range of $50-55.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Lights out at the "Pub"

Thomas Baker
 

Very sad! I had hope that RMC could stage a comeback. I appreciated the series of articles by Ted Culotta and the tips on modeling structures. Now whither?

Tom Baker
Posted by: Tony Thompson <tony@...>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links




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Re: Lights out at the "Pub"

Bill Schneider
 

Absolutely. Bill called me not long ago with the news. However, at the risk of ending up in moderator jail, perhaps more of a shame than a shock…


Regardless, we have lost the one print publication that seemed to be really interested in freight cars and prototype modeling.

 

Bill Schneider

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, August 22, 2014 1:35 PM
To: STMFC; Espee List; resinfreightcars@...
Subject: [STMFC] Fwd: Lights out at the "Pub"

 

 

No comment need be added. What a shock and a shame. Tony Thompson

Begin forwarded message:

> From: Bill Schaumburg <bills@...>
> Date: August 22, 2014 9:31:29 AM PDT
> Subject: Lights out at the "Pub"
>
> Colleagues,
>
> It has been a great run and it is lights out at Carstens Pub by 5:00 p.m. I will close out my term here of nearly 38 years with the following from Doug Adams, who wrote it around the time I came to RMC:
>
> "So Long, and Thanks for all the fish."
>
> Bill Schaumburg


Re: HOPPER CAR BRAKE RIGGING

Schleigh Mike
 

Don't overlook the Tichy #3034 set.  It has both the KC and KD options.


On Friday, August 22, 2014 1:34 PM, "WILLIAM PARDIE PARDIEW001@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
This is very good information on the dimensions of the brake cylinders.  It
leads to the question of the diameter of the air reservoir on the K brake
systems.  I seem to have noticed different diameters but to my knowledge
only one size has been produced in HO.

Thanks again:

Bill Pardie

On Aug 21, 2014, at 1:38 PM, destorzek@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

---In STMFC@..., wrote :


 
"An 8x12" cylinder was standard in 1900, even for 50-ton cars. Shortly after, the more familiar 10x12" cylinder became standard for heavier cars including many 50-ton cars. Cars rebuilt in the 'teens often retained the older brake equipment. However, cars built before the 1911 act often had the older brake layout revised into compliance."
.
Grandt Line makes a KC set with the 8x12 cylinder for narrow gauge cars. This is a very nice set, that I used to pack with my Soo Line caboose kits, as the cabooses retained their 8x12 brake cylinders through the AB conversion and went to scrap with them in the sixties.
.
Dennis Storzek
 
 





Mike


Lights out at the "Pub"

Tony Thompson
 

No comment need be added. What a shock and a shame. Tony Thompson

Begin forwarded message:

From: Bill Schaumburg <bills@...>
Date: August 22, 2014 9:31:29 AM PDT
Subject: Lights out at the "Pub"

Colleagues,

It has been a great run and it is lights out at Carstens Pub by 5:00 p.m. I will close out my term here of nearly 38 years with the following from Doug Adams, who wrote it around the time I came to RMC:

"So Long, and Thanks for all the fish."

Bill Schaumburg


Re: CAD library

Dave Nelson
 

No way… almost none of the models you find in that Warehouse are suitable for rail simulators… or anything else, AFAIK.

 

Dave Nelson

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 21, 2014 11:23 AM
To: Steam Era Freight Cars
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: CAD library

 

Most of these seem to be drawings for virtual railroad programs.

 

Scott Haycock

 


Re: HOPPER CAR BRAKE RIGGING

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

This is very good information on the dimensions of the brake cylinders.  It
leads to the question of the diameter of the air reservoir on the K brake
systems.  I seem to have noticed different diameters but to my knowledge
only one size has been produced in HO.

Thanks again:

Bill Pardie

On Aug 21, 2014, at 1:38 PM, destorzek@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

---In STMFC@..., wrote :


 
"An 8x12" cylinder was standard in 1900, even for 50-ton cars. Shortly after, the more familiar 10x12" cylinder became standard for heavier cars including many 50-ton cars. Cars rebuilt in the 'teens often retained the older brake equipment. However, cars built before the 1911 act often had the older brake layout revised into compliance."
.
Grandt Line makes a KC set with the 8x12 cylinder for narrow gauge cars. This is a very nice set, that I used to pack with my Soo Line caboose kits, as the cabooses retained their 8x12 brake cylinders through the AB conversion and went to scrap with them in the sixties.
.
Dennis Storzek
 
 



Intermountain wheels and alt std AAR hopper kits

Andy Carlson
 

Hello STMFC-ers-

I have a few 12 packs of Intermountain semi-scale 33" code 88 wheel sets left. Offered at $39 for 4 12-packs (enough for 12 freight cars).

I have 2 Intermountain alternate standard AAR 2-bay coal hopper kits. $24/each.

All of the above prices include 1st class USPS shipping. I accept checks and money orders. for a small fee I accept PayPal, as well.

Please contact me OFF-LIST at
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



Re: Need some help on an 'O' Santa Fe reefer

John Barry
 

Santa Fe had 150 cars in series 1570-1719 built in 1902 initially owned by the Santa Fe Refrigerator Line.  These cars were gone by 1928, with only 19 remaining in 1925.  This series was assigned to class Rr-K in the 1902 renumbering and classification.


In July 1902, the refrigerator operations were consolidated into a new subsidiary, Santa Fe Refrigerator Despatch, reporting mark SFRD.  Existing refers in AT&SF and SFRL marks were relettered SFRD after this date.  That would not have been instantaneous, but barring photographic evidence, unusual after a couple of years to see a SFRL mark.  


 
John Barry


ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights


707-490-9696


3450 Palmer Drive, Suite 4224
Cameron Park, CA 95682


From: "Bob Colquitt wahsatch@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Cc: wahsatch@...
Sent: Friday, August 22, 2014 8:14 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Need some help on an 'O' Santa Fe reefer

 
Got this reefer off eBay - looks good but needs some help.

Think it's a Westbrook wood kit assembled; here goes:

Santa Fe Refrigerator Line SFRL # 1597, 40T, 40 ft, "2 over 7 then O2 -
class?", truss rods

1] Real deal or make believe? photo for adding decals appropriate for 1935?

2] What type of trucks?

3] Anyone make 'O' door hinges & latch? - just printed on - need to buy
PSC catalog

4] Tack board - proto size/thickness?

5] Underside detail - brake rigging, etc?

6] Hand brake &/or platform?

Thanks for any help!

-=- Bob Colquitt



Re: SP lumber trains in the Fraley frt conductor book

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi Jim and List Members,

Jim, your post is indeed a very interesting read!

Thanks

Claus Schlund



-------- Original message --------
From: "jcdworkingonthenp@... [STMFC]"
Date:08/22/2014 12:33 AM (GMT-05:00)
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: SP lumber trains in the Fraley frt conductor book

Mike after researching for the Northern Pacific’s lumber train, the J Manifest, my research closely matches both your post and Tony’s post 127431 also.  Per Tony, I also found that the shipper’s preference was as Tony relates, 50-ft DD XM cars. However in any case, boxcars, any ones boxcars seemed to take preference over flats for the reasons that follow.

    The NP always preferred that lumber be loaded into boxcars whenever possible as this prevented the possibility of the lumber shifting in a dangerous manner. NP records reference ICC records of wrecks being attributed to shifting lumber loads and the NP had several “load shifters”  to deal with these shifted loads between the west coast lumber areas and St. Paul where it handed off this traffic. Some loads were dealt with (resorted) up to nine times between the two prior mentioned areas.

      The NP’s J Manifest started after an investigation of a semaphore being knocked down and other subsequent notable events even after this manifest started include a shifted load shattering the windows of a car on a local and breaking the arm of a passenger aboard the same. Also a shifted timber on a flat nicking a switch at Coon Creek Junction, MN, which then threw the switch under the train and piling up the 40 or so following cars.

    The lumber shifting was thought to be caused by the dynamic augment of the piston thrusts of steam locomotives being transmitted through the drawbars. (If someone with a better grasp of physics can explain this better, go for it).

      I think many of the sheets regarding shifted loads I have, list car numbers and so I will search for these and scan some pages so we can see the variety of cars used. I may have a Conductors report of a J Manifest itself, and will try to get a scan to the files. XM’s predominate on that train report as you list on your finding Mike on the train report you found.

     One thing notable in these shifted loads on flats seems to be various sizes of lumber loaded on a car and even more so; larger timbers loaded on top of smaller sizes of lumber and this did not have to be great differences. One example had 4x10 inch under 6 x 12 inch, with 4x10s causing trouble.

   That would be my only (very minor) concern with the Owl Mountain kit. Different sizes of lumber.

    This kit alone or with various other sizes set on top does much to as Tony relates in his blog; saves time and saves strip wood for other projects.

    I do welcome the Owl Mountain kit and want to thank Tony for bringing this to the group’s attention.  

Jim Dick - St. Paul


Re: Need some help on an 'O' Santa Fe reefer

Benjamin Hom
 

Bob Colquitt asked:
"Got this reefer off eBay - looks good but needs some help."
 
Item number?  It'll help us to help you if we see the model.
 
 
Ben Hom


Need some help on an 'O' Santa Fe reefer

wahsatch
 

Got this reefer off eBay - looks good but needs some help.

Think it's a Westbrook wood kit assembled; here goes:


Santa Fe Refrigerator Line SFRL # 1597, 40T, 40 ft, "2 over 7 then O2 - class?", truss rods


1] Real deal or make believe? photo for adding decals appropriate for 1935?

2] What type of trucks?

3] Anyone make 'O' door hinges & latch? - just printed on - need to buy PSC catalog

4] Tack board - proto size/thickness?

5] Underside detail - brake rigging, etc?

6] Hand brake &/or platform?

Thanks for any help!

-=- Bob Colquitt


second sale of Hendrickson kits

Tony Thompson
 

I am announcing today a sale of another part of Richard Hendrickson's reserve of HO scale kits, mostly Sunshine in this batch. Few if any of these are still available, so this is an opportunity for many of you. The list is attached below, for the second group of kits.
I will conduct the sale in the following way. Anyone wishing to buy kits should submit a bid directly to me, one and only one bid per kit, though of course you might wish to bid on more than one kit. [PLEASE remember to submit bids OFF the list, directly to me.] The highest bid for each kit will win.
The deadline for bids will be noon, Pacific time, on Wednesday, August 27. I will notify winning bidders promptly with payment instructions. If you do not hear from me by 3 PM Pacific time on August 27, 2014, you were not the successful bidder. I greatly prefer PayPal and will notify winners how to proceed on that; if PayPal is impossible for you, a check or money order is possible (include that information in your bid), and again, I will notify you how to submit it.
Minimum bid on each kit is $25, plus a nominal $5 for shipping for the first kit, $1.75 for each additional kit. All net revenue goes to Richard's widow Sandra. Kits remaining unsold on August 27 will go on eBay later. I will then take a break for a few weeks, but expect to have additional batches of kits thereafter.

Tony Thompson
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 540-6538; e-mail: tony@...


List of kits, in order by kit number

Kit no. Description (per kit box)
_____________________________________________________
SUNSHINE
2.1 CNW 65000 series box car, USRA steel rebuild
2.5 Rock Island 134000 series rebuilt box car, panel roof
3.1 ACL USRA steel side rebuilt box car
5.9 ATSF Ga-49 48’ 6” gondola, side doors, 1940-1960s
5.10 ATSF Ga-53 48’ 6” gondola without side doors, 1941-1960s
9.2 Wabash rebuilt box car, 3/7/8 ends, prewar door
10.8 PRR X31F turtleback jeep/auto car
12.6 PRR G29 46’ gondola, wood floor
17.14 Pacific Electric B-50-14 SS box car, Murphy radial roof, composite ends
28.4 Santa Fe SFRD Rr-29 1940 steel reefer, Duryea u’frame, curved map
35.1 ACL ventilated box car, O-17, center groove siding, 1919-1950s serif logo
40.5 IC 36000 series 40’ double-door auto car, original lettering
45.1 ATSF Ft-G flat car, revenue service decals
49.1 CNW 1923-25 Pratt truss box car, Hutchins roof
49.4 CMO 1927 Pratt truss box car, Viking roof
62.1 UTLX X-3 10,000 gallon tank car
66.4 ATSF Ft-O, Ft-P 50’ flat car
66.5 ATSF Ft-O 50’ flat car, auto loader
67.17 T&P 40’ gondola, fixed dreadnaught ends
68.2 ATSF dry ice reefer, three hinged doors
74.1 SFRD Rr-35, 36, 39, 40 steel reefer, Super Chief
74.8 SFRD Rr-43 steel reefer, Super Chief
85.7 D&RGW 62000 series 36’ box car, Murphy roof and ends
89.4 SFRD Rr-18 rebuilt USRA reefer, Map/Chief
94.1 SFRD Rr-44 rebuilt 1946-47 reefer, Map/Chief
95.1 Linde 1939-44 Duryea (box) tank car, original serif lettering
99.6 UTLX GATC radial rivet tank car

WESTERFIELD
3858 Northwestern Pacific USRA DS box car, modernized
4801 Santa Fe Bx-13 box car
4751 Santa Fe Bx-11/12 raised roof box car
8102 USRA Mill gondola NYC Lot 377-G, PMcK&Y 385-G


Re: SP lumber trains in the Fraley frt conductor book

np328
 

Mike after researching for the Northern Pacific’s lumber train, the J Manifest, my research closely matches both your post and Tony’s post 127431 also.  Per Tony, I also found that the shipper’s preference was as Tony relates, 50-ft DD XM cars. However in any case, boxcars, any ones boxcars seemed to take preference over flats for the reasons that follow.

    The NP always preferred that lumber be loaded into boxcars whenever possible as this prevented the possibility of the lumber shifting in a dangerous manner. NP records reference ICC records of wrecks being attributed to shifting lumber loads and the NP had several “load shifters”  to deal with these shifted loads between the west coast lumber areas and St. Paul where it handed off this traffic. Some loads were dealt with (resorted) up to nine times between the two prior mentioned areas.

      The NP’s J Manifest started after an investigation of a semaphore being knocked down and other subsequent notable events even after this manifest started include a shifted load shattering the windows of a car on a local and breaking the arm of a passenger aboard the same. Also a shifted timber on a flat nicking a switch at Coon Creek Junction, MN, which then threw the switch under the train and piling up the 40 or so following cars.

    The lumber shifting was thought to be caused by the dynamic augment of the piston thrusts of steam locomotives being transmitted through the drawbars. (If someone with a better grasp of physics can explain this better, go for it).

      I think many of the sheets regarding shifted loads I have, list car numbers and so I will search for these and scan some pages so we can see the variety of cars used. I may have a Conductors report of a J Manifest itself, and will try to get a scan to the files. XM’s predominate on that train report as you list on your finding Mike on the train report you found.

     One thing notable in these shifted loads on flats seems to be various sizes of lumber loaded on a car and even more so; larger timbers loaded on top of smaller sizes of lumber and this did not have to be great differences. One example had 4x10 inch under 6 x 12 inch, with 4x10s causing trouble.

   That would be my only (very minor) concern with the Owl Mountain kit. Different sizes of lumber.

    This kit alone or with various other sizes set on top does much to as Tony relates in his blog; saves time and saves strip wood for other projects.

    I do welcome the Owl Mountain kit and want to thank Tony for bringing this to the group’s attention.  

Jim Dick - St. Paul


Re: new lumber load kit from Owl Mountain

Tim O'Connor
 

In the late 60's I watched a crew of young men (including a kid
from my high school) unloading a 40 foot NP box car that was loaded
with stick lumber that was amazingly tangled up inside the car --
Each stick had to be removed manually and stacked up on their flatbed
truck. The car was spotted at a team track.

Labor cost? Probably about $1.50 an hour back then... :-)

Tim O'

Doug,

Thanks for bringing out the intense labor aspect, which required larger crews on both ends of a shipment by box where a flat could be loaded/unloaded faster with fewer folks. Labor costs began to escalate and machinery came down in real terms, especially after the period of this list.

John Barry

68561 - 68580 of 195639