Date   

Re: Essential freight Car Series

Walter Cox
 

The educational value of Ted's Essential Freight Car series cannot be understated. It has taken me approximately ten years to collect the necessary information to assemble a representative roster of my home road, the CNR as it was in 1959. Were I to attempt to do the same for every railroad whose cars will appear on my layout I would be long gone before being able to complete the project. Thanks to Ted's articles, and his box car handbook, my boxcar roster is now complete. As far as modeling with kits that are no longer on the market is concerned that is not an issue, I do not have even one Sunshine kit but the information contained in the articles has allowed me to assemble kits to represent cars that existed in significant numbers on the roads that had them. I did not need to know all the car series on all the roads.
 
Walt Cox  
 
:
 



 


Re: The Ephemeral Nature of Modeling

Bill Welch
 

I guess age is making me less effectively acidic.
Bill Welch


Re: details (was Lights out at the "Pub")

Benjamin Hom
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"And seriousness is not a function of time. It's a choice."
True, but for a lot of the student members, it takes some time to make that choice, and education plays a huge role.


Ben Hom


Re: The Ephemeral Nature of Modeling

Richard Brennan <brennan8@...>
 

At 03:34 PM 8/23/2014, Bill Welsh [STMFC] wrote:
<<snip>> Further since the Group has said authoritatively
To re-state: "A small, vocal minority of the Group has said...."

For the rest of us:
PLEASE! DO keep publishing your excellent articles... in whatever form you feel works best:
Bound publication, printed magazine, e-zine, blog... or even as a PDF to those interested...

I suspect I am NOT alone in valuing the useful mix of prototype information and modeling.
Thanks for all your efforts...


--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------


Re: The Ephemeral Nature of Modeling

Tom Madden
 

Bill doesn't do sarcasm particularly well, but his point is well taken. I've been covering the expense of my 3D printing and CAD work very nicely by marketing replacement parts for Branchline heavyweight Pullman kits, which haven't been produced for several years. But there are thousands of them still out there. Sunshine kits are also out there, by the hundreds. It's also unwise to dismiss the possibility of some of Sunshine's kits reappearing, as Bill says, remastered and/or under a different brand.

About half way through RMC's publication of Ted's articles, I decided to scan each one, save them as PDFs, and compile an index in Excel. I refer to them often, and being able to call up any of his articles on my laptop with one click makes them extremely useful. There is so much "technique" embedded in each article that I don't see them becoming obsolete any time soon. Paul Larson and Jack Work have been gone for many moons, but their articles from over half a century ago still contain much of value. I suspect Ted's will, too, 50 years from now.


Tom Madden


Re: KCS PS-1 boxcars

proto48er
 

Guys - Well, I may have answered my own question!  There is a great builders photo of KCS #18746 on the Fallen Flags website!  The paint scheme is very plain on the car, so I would suspect that cars in the earlier (KCS #18150-18549) series would also have been painted without any heralds or such!

Does anyone have a photo of a car from the KCS #18150-18549 series? 

I want to "backdate" an "O" scale brass model of a PS-1 imported by PSC in 1988.  My cutoff date is March of 1948, so I would prefer a photo of the earlier number series (blt 12/1947).  Fortunately, the PSC model has the early roof on it, but unfortunately has the 6 rectangles on each end.  Fixing that will require a bit of sheet metal work...

Thanks again!!

A.T. Kott


The Ephemeral Nature of Modeling

Bill Welch
 

Given the "Ephemeral Nature of Modeling" I am going to email Ted and ask him to withdraw my article using the MDC 50-foot single sheathed car to model SL-SF and T&P prototype for Volume Three of Prototype Railroad Modeling. Further since the Group has said authoritatively that the prototypes represented by Sunshine's array of kits will never again be seen under another label or remastered (or words/meanings to that effect), I am not going to finish writing the captions for the article I am working on for Volume Four about modeling the T&NO's Allen Door equipped SS cars or Part II Modeling... of the Article I started in Volume Two where I wrote about the FGE/WFE/BRE System's truss rod refrigerator cars since no one has any of them in their stash of kits.

Bill Welch


Re: Was - Re: Lights out at the "Pub"

Jim Betz
 

Creeping out of the dark corners again ...

So here's the other side of the "dark secret" ...

What I will miss about not having Prototype Modeler,
Mainline Modeler, RMC, and so many others is the

- articles -

because they were/are a great resource for modeling
techniques, tools, and products.
And the yahoo groups (and other such 'lists') don't
quite have the same level of detail in them that the
magazine articles had ... or the topic drags out over
several days and it is difficult to separate the wheat
from the chaff.
MRH does have 'in depth articles' ... in fact their
articles are often more complete than many/most
of the articles in the mags. But MRH also is "the
new kid on the block" and so it doesn't have the
long history of articles.
Said another way - if I want to look up a topic
(especially a 'how to') then I often get better/more
complete info from a 10-year old magazine article
than I do from other sources.

The other nice thing about the magazines is that
they tended to 'spark interest in some topic or
other' ... on a monthly basis they "prodded us to
think about and work on stuff we might not have
worked on if it hadn't been for some article". I
have fond memories of "going out to the club on
a Friday night and spending the majority of the time
there just "talking about modeling" ... inspired by the
just arrived RMC/MR/whatever issue and the articles
in it.

... Maybe what we need in this age of "everything
is online" are web sites devoted to "articles" about
model railroading where we share our 'clinics' on
any and all things model railroading?
And not just another yahoo group where we
discuss/debate/argue about this and that and
where everything seems to go "off topic" and
threads get so derailed that the useable content
ends up getting tossed rather than put in
another box car for delivery?
- Jim


KCS PS-1 boxcars

proto48er
 

Guys -I hate to see RMC go, too! 

However, I have a freight car question: Does anyone have a prototype photo of one of the KCS PS-1 40' boxcars in series KCS #18150-18548 in original (December, 1947) paint?  These cars reportedly had 6' 7-panel Superior doors.  Did they have any slogan on them, or were they just plainly painted?  (A related question concerning KCS #18550-18949 built in March, 1948, is were they painted differently?)


Thanks!!


A.T. Kott


Re: Lights out at the "Pub"

Armand Premo
 

Weathering is pretty much to personal taste.Overly weathered cars stand out as much as a shiny new car.I  feel subtle weathering is better.Armand Premo----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, August 23, 2014 4:50 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Fwd: Lights out at the "Pub"

 

Tony,

I haven't "forgotten" anything. I don't model yards before 1950 -- Why should
I care what they look like? From 1950 to 1960 railroads and private owners bought
about 700,000 new freight cars and probably repainted a similar number of cars.
If there were ever an era on American railroads where you could find a lot of
very clean freight cars, it was the 1955 to 1965 era, which happens to be my
main era of interest.

I'm not advocating lots of shiny cars. I'm just saying they were not an unusual
sight at the end of the steam era. I'm looking at my favorite shot of SP's Bullring
yard now -- dozens of fairly new (less than 5 yrs old) freight cars -- and there
on one of the tracks, a spanking shiny new SP box car.

Tim


Tim, you forget how dirty freight cars often were in the steam era. Look at photos from before 1950 to refresh your memory. And I have possession of photos taken in those days within a month or two of the manufacture of a particular freight car, and there is a definite haze of dirt and dust already. I would say any transition era layout had better NOT have more than one SHINY NEW car.

Tony Thompson

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Re: details (was Lights out at the "Pub")

A&Y Dave in MD
 

True, but some take time to appreciate that they have the choice. One modeler I knew in the 70's invited first time visitors to run a train on his layout. He didn't offer any guidance or announce it was a test, but he noted how you approached the offer and how you performed and after a circuit around the layout he would tell you if you looked like a passenger engineer, freight hogger, or simply a brakeman. That designation, he told you, would determine what jobs and what trust level you could earn. Some visitors took a while but worked their way to higher trust, others got high trust by their obvious care and willingness to run at scale speeds naturally, and some never got it, and eventually weren't invited back. Time allows for some growth, and still allows for basket cases to be "designated for assignment."

Since he was my best friend's neighbor, I appreciated his willingness to let this brakeman learn over time :-)

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Aug 23, 2014, at 5:00 PM, "Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

And seriousness is not a function of time. It's a
choice.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Lights out at the "Pub"

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony, what I said was in the context of referring to the current practice
of heavily weathered models --

http://www.mellowmike.com/Macro/MILW86_EB1.jpg
http://i192.photobucket.com/albums/z86/88_Fiero_2M4/ADMHopper.jpg
http://www.hubhobbyshop.com/hint49d.JPG

That level of rust and filth obviously existed prior to 1990, but it was
not the majority of freight cars.

After 1990 (a ballpark figure) it's not hard to find incredibly dirty cars,
to say nothing of graffiti.
http://www.prestoimages.net/store30/rd6049/6049_page73222.jpg

Whatever. YMMV.



I haven't "forgotten" anything. I don't model yards before 1950 -- Why should
I care what they look like? From 1950 to 1960 railroads and private owners bought
about 700,000 new freight cars and probably repainted a similar number of cars . . .

      Ah, yes, but you specifically said "before 1990." I was just responding to that, in that not EVERYTHING before 1990 was the 1950-60 stuff.

Tony Thompson


Re: details (was Lights out at the "Pub")

Tim O'Connor
 

Repairing broken cars goes with the territory Ben. I'm just saying that the
bad order ratio at the RPI club is much less than the 50% ratio found at the
clubs I've belonged to. And seriousness is not a function of time. It's a
choice.

Tim O'Connor

"On the other hand, when I operate on the RPI club, there are literally hundreds of
finely detailed, undamaged freight cars. So maybe there's a lesson here -- If you
operate with yahoos and bozos, you have to expect the consequences. But if your
operators are serious modelers and respectful of equipment, then detail to your
heart's content!"

That's because most of the damaged ones have been pulled off the layout. I've got quite
of few of them on my rip track. New members don't become serious members overnight.

Ben Hom


Re: Weathering was Fwd: Lights out at the "Pub"

genegreen1942@...
 

I wonder (idly) how many of us model an idealized version of reality. Is our weathering lighter than reality would have it, our buildings in a little better repair or – in my case, growing up in northern Iowa – are our automobiles a lot less rusty than they really were. Perhaps we are recreating a revisionist version of an idealized time gone by less as we remember it and more as we wish it had been.

That said, right now my model railroad is suffering under a nationwide strike of all workers; nothing is moving, no work is being done.


Gene Green



Re: Lights out at the "Pub"

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:

I haven't "forgotten" anything. I don't model yards before 1950 -- Why should
I care what they look like? From 1950 to 1960 railroads and private owners bought
about 700,000 new freight cars and probably repainted a similar number of cars . . .


      Ah, yes, but you specifically said "before 1990." I was just responding to that, in that not EVERYTHING before 1990 was the 1950-60 stuff.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Lights out at the "Pub"

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony,

I haven't "forgotten" anything. I don't model yards before 1950 -- Why should
I care what they look like? From 1950 to 1960 railroads and private owners bought
about 700,000 new freight cars and probably repainted a similar number of cars.
If there were ever an era on American railroads where you could find a lot of
very clean freight cars, it was the 1955 to 1965 era, which happens to be my
main era of interest.

I'm not advocating lots of shiny cars. I'm just saying they were not an unusual
sight at the end of the steam era. I'm looking at my favorite shot of SP's Bullring
yard now -- dozens of fairly new (less than 5 yrs old) freight cars -- and there
on one of the tracks, a spanking shiny new SP box car.

Tim


Tim, you forget how dirty freight cars often were in the steam era. Look at photos from before 1950 to refresh your memory. And I have possession of photos taken in those days within a month or two of the manufacture of a particular freight car, and there is a definite haze of dirt and dust already. I would say any transition era layout had better NOT have more than one SHINY NEW car.

Tony Thompson


Weathering was Fwd: Lights out at the "Pub"

Craig Zeni
 

On Aug 23, 2014, at 1:21 PM, STMFC@yahoogroups.com wrote:

1.9. Re: Fwd: Lights out at the "Pub"
Posted by: "Tony Thompson" tony@signaturepress.com sigpress
Date: Sat Aug 23, 2014 10:21 am ((PDT))

Tim O'Connor wrote:

lol -- yeah, "weathering" these days seems to be synomymous with "incredibly
rusted and filthy". If you model any era before the year 1990, you might want
to lighten up on the filth! :-)

It's funny how rarely people model SHINY BRAND NEW freight cars . . .

Tim, you forget how dirty freight cars often were in the steam era. Look at photos from before 1950 to refresh your memory. And I have possession of photos taken in those days within a month or two of the manufacture of a particular freight car, and there is a definite haze of dirt and dust already. I would say any transition era layout had better NOT have more than one SHINY NEW car.
Tony, that dirtiness was an appreciation that I took away from the clinics that you and Richard did at Cocoa. And from that I adopted your acrylic wash methods and added to them with Bragdon powders and Prismacolor pencils and create grimy dirty cars. Three years ago at Cocoa people were asking why I didn't weather my models - I didn't know how or rather couldn't do it as I could not get past my fear of ruining a model. I went to your clinic; two years ago one of the same guys who asked my why I didn't weather was asking me how I did it :) So thanks!

But what I've noted is that while steam era cars were filthy, they weren't necessarily rusted crusty scabby messes on wheels the way modern weathered cars seem to be with sheets of paint replaced by rust and sides covered in graffito. At the St Louis RPM meet were the guys who do the modern cars and do a superb job of replicating that on models. But that look I don't think is appropriate for steam era equipment; not the giant scabs of rust and certainly not the graffito.

Craig Zeni
Sent from my soup can with the string pulled really tight.


Schaumburg's E Mail address

Mikebrock
 

Guys,
I need Bill Schaumburg's E Mail address. The previous one that I have:

editorbill@tellurian.com

apparently is no longer working.

Please send it to me at:

brockm@cfl.rr.com

Thanks,

Mike Brock


Re: Lights out at the "Pub"

caboose9792@...
 

Reportedly they are selling RMC and R&R magazines to another publisher. If they honor the old subscriptions is to be seen.
 
Mark Rickert
 

In a message dated 8/23/2014 2:06:56 P.M. Central Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

I should have known.  Subscribed for the first time in many years as the local Hobbytown USA decided to drop Model Railroad Magazines.   Well, at least I got one issue out of 12.   Also subscribed to Railfan &Railroad.   Wonder if they will do anything for the subscriptions….

Charlie Vlk


Re: Lights out at the "Pub"

caboose9792@...
 

Strangely they had no problem with renewal notices in my snail mailbox or sending me ads in my email box, last ad was in my email was the end of June. Last reply I got from them was mid-July about an order. On the plus side they did have money to go to the NMRA nationals, which is not a cheep event.
 
Mark Rickert

In a message dated 8/23/2014 12:03:15 A.M. Central Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
Although I have received vibes of Carstens financial difficulty for now several years (authors not being paid), I smelled a rat when inadvertently my subscription ran out last Fall, and despite eMails, etc. I received no interest at all in effecting a renewal- none.

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