Date   
Re: NH 62884

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :Except the mid-height one, where the bolt apparently is through bolted to the car side.  Or is that a lag screw?  We’ll never know now .... .


Can't be a lag screw, as the MCB/ARA standards required bolts.

Dennis


Re: Dale Edwards owner of Kadee Passes away

Justin Crom
 

I am very sorry to hear of Dale's passing.  I have a fondness for Dale and Keith even though I never met them.  When I was 12 yrs old and had my first HO layout, I discovered the KD couplers (the old, non-magnetic style) at All Nations Hobby Shop in Chicago.  They looked so great!  A neighbor, a tool and die guy, used them on some of the cars he scratch-built, and I was immediately hooked.  Now at age 65 I use the #58s and kin, and enjoy looking at the many Kadee freight cars on my layout.  What a difference those guys, and the companies they spawned, have made to my enjoyment of model railroading. 

My condolences to all of you on this loss,
                 Justin Crom





On 09/23/2014 04:57 PM, mail@... [STMFC] wrote:

With a sadness in our hearts, Dale Edwards, owner and co-founder of Kadee Quality Products, passed away on Friday the 19th, 2014.

Dale was 93 and remained active in the operations and management of Kadee into his last days. Model railroading was his life from his childhood through his adulthood and he never retired or stopped working.

Dale and his twin brother Keith, who passed away in July 2012, founded Kadee Quality Products in the mid 1940s.

 

Dale will be sorely missed and his memory will always live on here at Kadee.

 

Sam Clarke

Kadee Quality Products


Re: BJs is now selling 3D printers- printer wars soon?

Jack Burgess
 

Tim said:

<

<These "draft quality" printers may be extremely useful for development

<of new models, because of their low cost to produce test shots.

Not really in my opinion. While working on a 3D project, I continually upload it to Shapeways to test my work. When I first started working in 3D a year ago, I was just anxious to see if the file actually looked like what I was working on without errors (sometimes it did and sometimes it didn't for unknown reasons). Now with more experience, I continually test models for minimum thickness issues since I want to get right to the limit. Test models can be printed in much cheaper materials than Frosted Ultra Detail to confirm general issues but, as you get more comfortable with the software, you also get more assured that the final "print" will be want you are expecting...

Jack Burgess

 

Re: NH 62884

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Happy to do that Don.  Did you note that the back side of the stile for the side ladder is coped so as to allow the rungs to be bolted just to the stile, and not to the car side?  Except the mid-height one, where the bolt apparently is through bolted to the car side.  Or is that a lag screw?  We’ll never know now . . .

 


Schuyler

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, September 23, 2014 7:31 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: NH 62884

 

 

     Interesting photo, Schuyler. Look at the number of cracks in the wood fascia boards especially. Also the differing shapes of the stiles for the ladders. That on the side looks to be about a 3 x 4, rather than a 2 x4,

with the narrow side out. Then, too, look at the attachment of the grab irons, some with square nuts and some with hex nuts. Whatever floats your boat I guess. Below the "2" in the car number we see what must be

a really cobbled repair with two butt joints side by side. Not something done at Readville I'll wager. And look at the way the corner shaped grab

irons are woven together were they meet at the lower right. Makes me

wonder how often this method might have been used on lateral roof walks as well. Lastly we come to the cast iron "wells" for the nuts of the four

stay rods in the end sill. Thats a neat way to do things that I have not

seen before. Great photo! I'm glad you posted it.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine

Re: Fork Lifts

Tim O'Connor
 


Around 1970, railroad box car doors will begin to be equipped with castings
that are designed for the fork lifts to push against, to open and close
the doors. On some railroads these will be painted a contrasting color so
that even the genius operating the fork lift will notice them. :-) Some may
even apply special stencils, in the off chance the operator is literate.

I know that date is well into the future so it's just offered up here as
a tidbit gleaned from my crystal ball...

Tim O'Connor



It happened after our era of interest, but one other solution to the problem of forklift damage on doors was the Slidewell device, IIRC made by Henesey (?) Products. These were a gearbox and hand wheel attached to the door which slid along a toothed track mounted horizontally about the middle height of the car side. These had their own problems, as workers would spin the wheel hard and when the gearbox hit the end of the track, the quick stop would strip the gears inside. Later models where equipped with a sort of clutch and lever system that moved the gears apart when the lever hit the end block. A lot of GM auto parts pool cars had Slidewells, and N&W bought them for their MoW storage cars. I even photographed a double-door car that had them on both sides. I scratchbuilt a couple of Slidewells on Athearn boxcars many years ago and wrote an article for MR. They paid me for the article, but never used it. (Sigh!)

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff

Re: BJs is now selling 3D printers- printer wars soon?

Tim O'Connor
 

Jack

These "draft quality" printers may be extremely useful for development of
new models, because of their low cost to produce test shots.

I wonder if someone with a degree in higher math can use "fractal" geometry
to develop randomized CAD images for sugar beet loads? People have tried just
about every kind of seed/grain out there but none of them are quite right for
the job -- Not to mention that mice like to eat them!

Tim O'Connor

I recall reading several months ago that the original 3D printer patents have run out. So these are low-resolution printers using existing technology. What we need are higher resolution printers in the $100,000 range that Shapeways will purchase to print higher resolution items.

Jack Burgess

Not what I'm looking for yet for N scale detail but is this the start of 3D p rinter wars? Will we see price drops, new features and better resolution? Will we one day see the computer sales (unless everybody goes to tablets) one day offering a 3D printer free or for a few dollars more on an order?

Gordon

Dale Edwards owner of Kadee Passes away

x702samc
 

With a sadness in our hearts, Dale Edwards, owner and co-founder of Kadee Quality Products, passed away on Friday the 19th, 2014.

Dale was 93 and remained active in the operations and management of Kadee into his last days. Model railroading was his life from his childhood through his adulthood and he never retired or stopped working.

Dale and his twin brother Keith, who passed away in July 2012, founded Kadee Quality Products in the mid 1940s.

 

Dale will be sorely missed and his memory will always live on here at Kadee.

 

Sam Clarke

Kadee Quality Products

3D printers and price wars

Fran Giacoma
 

Dave Owens said:


Some public libraries have purchased 3D printers for patron's use. You
might check around your area before plunking down your money. Here in
Connecticut the Westport library has a 3D printer for public use.

I agree. According to the librarian, over half the libraries in the Delaware system have them. They have been making small (1") parts and animals (to demonstrate its capability) and the detail is good. This will give me a chance to try out this new technology with minimal investment - the library charges are very low.


Fran Giacoma



Re: BJs is now selling 3D printers- printer wars soon?

Jack Burgess
 

I recall reading several months ago that the original 3D printer patents have run out. So these are low-resolution printers using existing technology. What we need are higher resolution printers in the $100,000 range that Shapeways will purchase to print higher resolution items.

 

Jack Burgess

 

Not what I'm looking for yet for N scale detail but is this the start of 3D p rinter wars? Will we see price drops, new features and better resolution? Will we one day see the computer sales (unless everybody goes to tablets) one day offering a 3D printer free or for a few dollars more on an order?

Gordon

Re: BJs is now selling 3D printers- printer wars soon?

Dave Owens
 

Some public libraries have purchased 3D printers for patron's use. You
might check around your area before plunking down your money. Here in
Connecticut the Westport library has a 3D printer for public use.

Dave Owens
West Hartford, Conn.

On Tue, Sep 23, 2014 at 5:03 PM, BRIAN PAUL EHNI bpehni@...
[STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
Looks the same as the $300 cheaper Dremel.
http://www.amazon.com/Dremel-3D20-01-Idea-Builder-Printer/dp/B00NA00MWS


Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Date: Tuesday, September 23, 2014 at 2:30 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] BJs is now selling 3D printers- printer wars soon?







BJs is now selling 3D printers.

FlashForge Dreamer 3D Printer - BJ's Wholesale Club
<http://www.bjs.com/flashforge-dreamer-3d-printer.product.277760>





<http://www.bjs.com/flashforge-dreamer-3d-printer.product.277760>

FlashForge Dreamer 3D Printer - BJ's Wholesale Club
<http://www.bjs.com/flashforge-dreamer-3d-printer.product.277760> Home >
Computers > Printers and Office Machines > 3D Printers & Accessories Close




View on www.bjs.com
<http://www.bjs.com/flashforge-dreamer-3d-printer.product.277760>
Preview by Yahoo




Not what I'm looking for yet for N scale detail but is this the start of 3D
printer wars? Will we see price drops, new features and better resolution?
Will we one day see the computer sales (unless everybody goes to tablets)
one day offering a 3D printer free or for a few dollars more on an order?

Gordon















------------------------------------
Posted by: BRIAN PAUL EHNI <bpehni@...>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links




--
2015 New England/Northeast Prototype Modelers Meet
May 29-30, 2015 (Always the weekend after Memorial Day)
Collinsville, Connecticut
www.neprototypemeet.com
www.facebook.com/NERPM

Re: BJs is now selling 3D printers- printer wars soon?

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

Looks the same as the $300 cheaper Dremel.
http://www.amazon.com/Dremel-3D20-01-Idea-Builder-Printer/dp/B00NA00MWS


Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Date: Tuesday, September 23, 2014 at 2:30 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] BJs is now selling 3D printers- printer wars soon?







BJs is now selling 3D printers.

FlashForge Dreamer 3D Printer - BJ's Wholesale Club
<http://www.bjs.com/flashforge-dreamer-3d-printer.product.277760>





<http://www.bjs.com/flashforge-dreamer-3d-printer.product.277760>

FlashForge Dreamer 3D Printer - BJ's Wholesale Club
<http://www.bjs.com/flashforge-dreamer-3d-printer.product.277760> Home >
Computers > Printers and Office Machines > 3D Printers & Accessories Close




View on www.bjs.com
<http://www.bjs.com/flashforge-dreamer-3d-printer.product.277760>
Preview by Yahoo




Not what I'm looking for yet for N scale detail but is this the start of 3D
printer wars? Will we see price drops, new features and better resolution?
Will we one day see the computer sales (unless everybody goes to tablets)
one day offering a 3D printer free or for a few dollars more on an order?

Gordon











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

BJs is now selling 3D printers- printer wars soon?

Bushnell.mp77 Account
 

BJs is now selling 3D printers.

FlashForge Dreamer 3D Printer - BJ's Wholesale Club

 

Not what I'm looking for yet for N scale detail but is this the start of 3D printer wars? Will we see price drops, new features and better resolution? Will we one day see the computer sales (unless everybody goes to tablets) one day offering a 3D printer free or for a few dollars more on an order?

Gordon


Re: Simulating "Polished" Steel Surfaces

Michael Watnoski
 

Hi William,

    Try a graphite pencil over a dark and varied rust color.

Michael


On 9/23/2014 10:29 AM, 'William Botkin' webotkin@... [STMFC] wrote:

Hi,

 

I seem to recall some discussions and/or articles about simulating “polished” steel surfaces, such as you might see on a hopper slope sheet or a bulldozer blade.  Any suggestions would be appreciated.

 

Thanks.

 

William E. Botkin

Centennial, CO

 


Re: Simulating "Polished" Steel Surfaces

al_brown03
 

Lately I've weathered a few hopper car interiors by Eric Hansmann's method. Google "weathering hopper interiors", either within the group or generally: he's described it on his blog, in much more detail than I can here. Using a combination of acrylics, the idea is to simulate metal "polished clean" of paint but with a little fresh rust. Reading the blog will suggest variants, both to make the metal more polished and to make it rustier.

 

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

Re: Simulating "Polished" Steel Surfaces

Benjamin Hom
 

William Botkin asked:
"I seem to recall some discussions and/or articles about simulating “polished” steel surfaces, such as you might see on a hopper slope sheet or a bulldozer blade. Any suggestions would be appreciated."

Discussions on the list were pretty extensive - did you do a search of the group archives?


Ben Hom

Simulating "Polished" Steel Surfaces

webotkin
 

Hi,

 

I seem to recall some discussions and/or articles about simulating “polished” steel surfaces, such as you might see on a hopper slope sheet or a bulldozer blade.  Any suggestions would be appreciated.

 

Thanks.

 

William E. Botkin

Centennial, CO

 

Re: NH 62884

Donald B. Valentine
 

     Interesting photo, Schuyler. Look at the number of cracks in the wood fascia boards especially. Also the differing shapes of the stiles for the ladders. That on the side looks to be about a 3 x 4, rather than a 2 x4,

with the narrow side out. Then, too, look at the attachment of the grab irons, some with square nuts and some with hex nuts. Whatever floats your boat I guess. Below the "2" in the car number we see what must be

a really cobbled repair with two butt joints side by side. Not something done at Readville I'll wager. And look at the way the corner shaped grab

irons are woven together were they meet at the lower right. Makes me

wonder how often this method might have been used on lateral roof walks as well. Lastly we come to the cast iron "wells" for the nuts of the four

stay rods in the end sill. Thats a neat way to do things that I have not

seen before. Great photo! I'm glad you posted it.

 

Cordially, Don Valentine

Re: Fork Lifts

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

It happened after our era of interest, but one other solution to the problem of forklift damage on doors was the Slidewell device, IIRC made by Henesey (?) Products. These were a gearbox and hand wheel attached to the door which slid along a toothed track mounted horizontally about the middle height of the car side. These had their own problems, as workers would spin the wheel hard and when the gearbox hit the end of the track, the quick stop would strip the gears inside. Later models where equipped with a sort of clutch and lever system that moved the gears apart when the lever hit the end block. A lot of GM auto parts pool cars had Slidewells, and N&W bought them for their MoW storage cars. I even photographed a double-door car that had them on both sides. I scratchbuilt a couple of Slidewells on Athearn boxcars many years ago and wrote an article for MR. They paid me for the article, but never used it. (Sigh!)

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 9/22/14 11:40 PM, cinderandeight@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Tim,
    This would involve both era, and size of an operation.  I drove fork trucks for nearly forty years at various jobs, and small operations often had gasoline trucks with stick shifts to load and unload box cars, and at times move the cars along the track although that was usually done with a big bar that wedged under the freight car wheel to lever it along the rails (if you had a level loading site).  Propane fork trucks are probably too modern for this list for the most part, but I could be wrong (not that old yet!).  Big shops (GM, Ford, etc.) with dozens or even hundreds of trucks used battery trucks, with a large charging/battery changing stations.  The battery not only provided power but also weight to stabilized the trucks when lifting loads.
    A previous post(s) commented on damage to the sides of cars due to fork truck abuse.  This was certainly a problem.  I saw whole car doors ripped off cars, and in one case a drunk fork truck driver driving a 9' 2" parts rack into a 9' 2" interior car with side rails.  It sort of fit after he pounded it into place with many hard attacks.  It was on old PRR X47 if I recall right, and I am sure it was the death of that car.  Newer auto parts box cars (X51 for example) were 9'4" inside width, and auto industry racks had been long since built to about 9' 2" wide because they would fit into the new cars.  The X47 should have never been assigned to an auto plant, it was asking for trouble.
    Eventually the railroads also wised up and started providing welded pushing pockets on car doors to give the fork truck drivers a place to push the door open safely, but I think for the most part this came along at about the time this group's time period ends.
    One other aside.  I recall at times unloading 40' box cars with a fork truck and the brakes of the car were so worn that you couldn't secure it in place, so you'd have the car move back and forth on the loading track, only secured by the dock plate, which on a long dock did nothing at all.  You'd drive into the car and head toward the load and actually be standing still relative to the building.  Then reverse and still be standing still relative to the building.  The car rolling back and forth the distance rather than you actually moving.  Then exit with your load and if you were good you hopefully could unload the whole car and still be sort of lined up with the building's doorway.  Sure we could have went out and placed timbers on the rails to hold the car still, but it was a fun game when you were 18 to play.  Now and then we had to go out near the end of a load and lever the car back closer to the door.
    Rich Burg

Re: Fork Lifts

altuna1122
 

Tim,
    This would involve both era, and size of an operation.  I drove fork trucks for nearly forty years at various jobs, and small operations often had gasoline trucks with stick shifts to load and unload box cars, and at times move the cars along the track although that was usually done with a big bar that wedged under the freight car wheel to lever it along the rails (if you had a level loading site).  Propane fork trucks are probably too modern for this list for the most part, but I could be wrong (not that old yet!).  Big shops (GM, Ford, etc.) with dozens or even hundreds of trucks used battery trucks, with a large charging/battery changing stations.  The battery not only provided power but also weight to stabilized the trucks when lifting loads.
    A previous post(s) commented on damage to the sides of cars due to fork truck abuse.  This was certainly a problem.  I saw whole car doors ripped off cars, and in one case a drunk fork truck driver driving a 9' 2" parts rack into a 9' 2" interior car with side rails.  It sort of fit after he pounded it into place with many hard attacks.  It was on old PRR X47 if I recall right, and I am sure it was the death of that car.  Newer auto parts box cars (X51 for example) were 9'4" inside width, and auto industry racks had been long since built to about 9' 2" wide because they would fit into the new cars.  The X47 should have never been assigned to an auto plant, it was asking for trouble.
    Eventually the railroads also wised up and started providing welded pushing pockets on car doors to give the fork truck drivers a place to push the door open safely, but I think for the most part this came along at about the time this group's time period ends.
    One other aside.  I recall at times unloading 40' box cars with a fork truck and the brakes of the car were so worn that you couldn't secure it in place, so you'd have the car move back and forth on the loading track, only secured by the dock plate, which on a long dock did nothing at all.  You'd drive into the car and head toward the load and actually be standing still relative to the building.  Then reverse and still be standing still relative to the building.  The car rolling back and forth the distance rather than you actually moving.  Then exit with your load and if you were good you hopefully could unload the whole car and still be sort of lined up with the building's doorway.  Sure we could have went out and placed timbers on the rails to hold the car still, but it was a fun game when you were 18 to play.  Now and then we had to go out near the end of a load and lever the car back closer to the door.
    Rich Burg

NH 62884

Schuyler Larrabee
 

From the Steamtown series of DL&W photos, ca 1918.

 

 

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-09-22-14/C5130.jpg

 

The B end.  It says so.

 

Schuyler