Date   

Re: Krylon clear flat v. Red Caboose silver paint

Tony Thompson
 

Schuyler Larrabee] wrote:

 
I will NEVER use Krylon on a model again.

Decades ago, I superdetailed an ABBA set of Athearn F7 units . . .

 I painted them with Floquil, and used Accucals and Accupaint for the yellow nose.  Lots of drying time between the two, and there wasn’t any reaction between the two paints or the decals and the Floquil black.  I overcoated them with Krylon, on the recommendation of a fellow club member.

 So after about two years or so, one day I took them out of the box and they felt a little “sticky.”  And then I noticed the fingerprints in the decals.  And the wrinkles in the stripes.  And then the fellow club member said “Oh, yeah, I’ve seen something like that on some of my models . . .”


   I'm happy to say I never had a tragedy like Schuyler describes, but I too have had problems in past years with Krylon. I too would recommend that it NOT be used for anything.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Krylon clear flat v. Red Caboose silver paint

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I will NEVER use Krylon on a model again.

 

Decades ago, I superdetailed an ABBA set of Athearn F7 units that I converted into the ERIE’s F5, 710 ABCD.  I really pulled out all the stops and they were really impressive, Protopowered, all four units and they could pull over 60 cars on the North Shore layout.  They have, of course, now been superseded by Genesis and other newer units.  I even got a large blue box that had foam in it, and they could be carried around in that box, just like a brass set.

 

I painted them with Floquil, and used Accucals and Accupaint for the yellow nose.  Lots of drying time between the two, and there wasn’t any reaction between the two paints or the decals and the Floquil black.  I overcoated them with Krylon, on the recommendation of a fellow club member.

 

So after about two years or so, one day I took them out of the box and they felt a little “sticky.”  And then I noticed the fingerprints in the decals.  And the wrinkles in the stripes.  And then the fellow club member said “Oh, yeah, I’ve seen something like that on some of my models . . .”

 

Hope someone can learn from my bitter experience.

 

Schuyler

 

 

I've been using Krylon clear flat finish in lieu of Testors Dull Coat
for awhile now with no problems. Saturday I prayed a Red Caboose 10,000
gallon tank car kit with it as part of the weathering process.

The Krylon reacted with the silver paint and "crinkled" it. The black
paint on the bottom of the tank and the frame along with the "Rustall" I
used on parts of the frame was fine.

I can't explain it, I had not had that trouble before, Just a heads up
to anyone looking to save a few bucks by using the Krylon.

Jeff White
Alma, IL


Re: Poultry Palace Car on film

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Doug,

You weren't kidding. I just rambled through the whole private owner section of my 1958 ORER, and found not one poultry car. Curiously, they were still listed among the descriptions of stock cars, and were classed by the AAR as "SP". I guess the AAR was slow to notice their disappearance. :~)

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 12/22/14 6:07 PM, 'Douglas Harding' doug.harding@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Brad here are some websites to check out. Poultry cars ran pretty much anywhere people raised or consumed poultry. Most of the cars were no longer in use by the 40’s.



Re: CN&L 2500 series s/s boxcar width

Benjamin Scanlon
 

I've been sent an ORER page indicating that the CN&L 2500-2524 and the later series 2525-2549 (which 2530 was part of) were 8'6" IH by 8'6" inner width ... so I'm assuming the outside width of the cars was probably more like 8'8 1/2" over the sheathing.  Same ORER gives a overall width over eaves of 9'3 1/2" which sounds sufficient for the bracing etc.   


Thanks to all


Ben Scanlon

London


Krylon clear flat v. Red Caboose silver paint

Jeffrey White
 

I've been using Krylon clear flat finish in lieu of Testors Dull Coat for awhile now with no problems. Saturday I prayed a Red Caboose 10,000 gallon tank car kit with it as part of the weathering process.

The Krylon reacted with the silver paint and "crinkled" it. The black paint on the bottom of the tank and the frame along with the "Rustall" I used on parts of the frame was fine.

I can't explain it, I had not had that trouble before, Just a heads up to anyone looking to save a few bucks by using the Krylon.

Jeff White
Alma, IL


Re: Red Caboose flat car weights

Bill Vaughn
 

Got lead shot in California recently for about the same price.

Bill Vaughn


On Monday, December 22, 2014 3:35 PM, "Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:


 


"lajrmdlr@..." wrote:
"Got #9 buckshot at a local gun shop about 15 years ago. Back then it cost $25.00 for 25 lb. Wonder if it can still be purchased given all the hoopla about lead these days."

You can get it from McMaster-Carr.
http://www.mcmaster.com/#lead-balls/=v51cyk

Ben Hom



Re: foreign road stock cars

SUVCWORR@...
 


In 1952 the PRR was carrying live poultry on train FW-8 in block 5 as it was reclassed at Enola destined for the Live Poultry Terminal in Long Island City.  Which specific cars I cannot verify.

FW-8 originated in Chicago added additional livestock in Fort Wayne and Crestline as well as deliver liverstock to both locations.  Another block of livestock was dropped at Canton Ohio.  Remaining livestock was fed and watered at Pittsburgh Joint Stock Yards.  Train was reclassed when leaving Pittsburgh and reclassed again in Enola where cars for the Reading and local locations were cut out.

Leaving Enola block 5 contained live poultry.  From the make-up of trains I cannot determine where the live poultry originated.  It is only specifically mentioned in the make-up leaving Enola.

The November 26, 1954 revision of the make-up of FW-8 shows the live poultry as part of block 9 leaving Herr's Island (Pittsburgh Joint Stock Yards) with a destination of the live poultry terminal in Long Island. Again the origin cannot be determined as cars in the train originate in several locations and there were connections with trains from Columbus and St Louis in Pittsburgh.

Rich Orr


Re: Red Caboose flat car weights

Benjamin Hom
 

"lajrmdlr@..." wrote:
"Got #9 buckshot at a local gun shop about 15 years ago. Back then it cost $25.00 for 25 lb. Wonder if it can still be purchased given all the hoopla about lead these days."

You can get it from McMaster-Carr.
http://www.mcmaster.com/#lead-balls/=v51cyk


Ben Hom


Re: Red Caboose flat car weights

Mark Drake <markstation01@...>
 

Is there any chance you can get the weights as s[are parts from Red Caboose? If not the sheet lead makes the most sense.
 
Mark L. Drake
eBay ID member1108


On Monday, December 22, 2014 4:56 PM, "lajrmdlr@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Got #9 buckshot at a local gun shop about 15 years ago. Back then it cost $25.00 for 25 lb. Wonder if it can still be purchased given all the hoopla about lead these days. Have foung all kinds f lead tire weights jus walking around town.. But Lead being so pliable, just about any shape can be pounded flat.



Re: Poultry Palace Car on film

Douglas Harding
 


Re: SR pulpwood car

water.kresse@...
 

The C&O later purchased some of them from SR.
Al Kresse


From: "dssa1051@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, December 22, 2014 4:43:47 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] SR pulpwood car

 

Thanks, for the very prompt answer.


Robert Oom



Re: GN 50' SS box cars

Staffan Ehnbom
 

The Howe truss cars were built in 1924-1926. Later cars built in 1926-1929 were Pratt truss.

Staffan Ehnbom

On Mon, Dec 22, 2014 at 9:29 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Several of these cars appear in an episode of the 1950s TV show "Highway Patrol". I noticed they have the less common Pratt trusses (diagonals are at the car bottom adjacent to the door{s}). I see the same thing on the models offered by Westerfield.


On page 193 of Ted Cullotta's plastic cover, spiral bound box car book it shows a similar car with the more common Howe trusses (diagonal braces at the top of the car adjacent to the door).


Were the diagonals changed?


Comments?


Ed Mines



Re: CN&L 2500 series s/s boxcar width

destorzek@...
 

Sounds too narrow to me for cars built that late.. USRA single sheathed cars were 8'-9" wide over the sills, and 9'-4" over the eaves. The double sheathed cars were onlt 8'-6" wide over the sills, but the wall system was thicker and were 9'-3 1/4" over the siding. Both were 8'-6" wide inside. Other cars of the era were similar.

Ben, you keep talking about designing patterns for cars in TT scale, but you don't have squat for reference material. At least buy the 1922 Car Builder'[s Cyclopedia reprint available on CD from Rail Driver.

RailDriver | Historic Cyclopedias

 


It will give you a lot of background if nothing else.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Red Caboose flat car weights

 

Got #9 buckshot at a local gun shop about 15 years ago. Back then it cost $25.00 for 25 lb. Wonder if it can still be purchased given all the hoopla about lead these days. Have foung all kinds f lead tire weights jus walking around town.. But Lead being so pliable, just about any shape can be pounded flat.


Re: SR pulpwood car

dssa1051
 

Thanks, for the very prompt answer.

Robert Oom


Re: foreign road stock cars

dssa1051
 

Looking at photos in various books it's easy to find NYC stock cars on the B&O on Sand Patch and ATSF stock cars on the PRR on Horseshoe Curve.  I think stock cars may have roamed nearly as much as boxcars did.

Robert Oom


Re: SR pulpwood car

O Fenton Wells
 

Robert,  In the February 1956 Model Railroader there is an O scale construction article for a Southern pulpwood car that appears to be a 10 stake pocket flat car with bulkhead ends and low wooden sides attached.  The number used on the model does not match any Southern flat cars or LP cars in the January 1952 ORER or January 1957 ORER. I can find no correlation between the MR article and an actual SR rack.  My guess is that this was based off the 116xxx and 117xxx cars that SR rebuilt from flat cars.

Is the car accurate and numbered incorrectly or actually a model of a car from another road?  The modeling is very nice even by today's standards but is the car freelanced? It is a nice model but it tells you how far we have come in prototype modeling.

Speaking of reversed dreadnaught ends the Southern made pulpwood cars from boxcars with reversed dreadnaught ends. Yes these were built in 1951 from the 148xxx series 40 foot double door boxcars from 1924 for the SR (Sunshine did the boxcar in HO a few years back).  WrighTrak does the pulpwood rack today in HO).
Fenton Wells

On Mon, Dec 22, 2014 at 4:25 PM, dssa1051@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

In the February 1956 Model Railroader there is an O scale construction article for a Southern pulpwood car that appears to be a 10 stake pocket flat car with bulkhead ends and low wooden sides attached.  The number used on the model does not match any Southern flat cars or LP cars in the January 1952 ORER or January 1957 ORER.

Is the car accurate and numbered incorrectly or actually a model of a car from another road?  The modeling is very nice even by today's standards but is the car freelanced?

Speaking of reversed dreadnaught ends the Southern made pulpwood cars from boxcars with reversed dreadnaught ends.

Robert Oom




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


SR pulpwood car

dssa1051
 

In the February 1956 Model Railroader there is an O scale construction article for a Southern pulpwood car that appears to be a 10 stake pocket flat car with bulkhead ends and low wooden sides attached.  The number used on the model does not match any Southern flat cars or LP cars in the January 1952 ORER or January 1957 ORER.

Is the car accurate and numbered incorrectly or actually a model of a car from another road?  The modeling is very nice even by today's standards but is the car freelanced?

Speaking of reversed dreadnaught ends the Southern made pulpwood cars from boxcars with reversed dreadnaught ends.

Robert Oom


Re: car end Sunday plus some other pictures of interest

destorzek@...
 




---In STMFC@..., <vasa0vasa@...> wrote :

Some interesting car ends:
 
Erie:
 
 
These ends are illustrated in the 1922 CBC on the Chicago-Cleveland pages as the "Indestructible Car End". It's not clear if they were marketed as replacements, or for new construction, probably both. While a pair of heavy structural steel Zees was a pretty common arrangement, the Chicago-Cleveland design included an extra heavy end top plate with diagonal tie bars under the roof in an attmept to provide a better anchorage for the top of these posts, and transfer the load further back along the car side. In reality, they were likely only marginally better than other vertical post designs, and were soon eclipsed by the various pressed steel ends.

Dennis Storzek


Ben Hom

Richard Townsend
 

Ben Hom please contact me off list.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon
 
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