Date   

Re: Car Weights

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I use wheel weights, from auto shops, though I bought mine on Amazon. They
are rectangular in cross section, about 3/32” thick by ½” x 5/8” for ¼ oz.,
and are presented on double-sticky foam tape. The sticky is REALLY sticky.
Get it on in the right place the first time.



Cheap thrills. I got enough to last me a LONG time.



Schuyler



Subject: [STMFC] Car Weights

I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided
cars? I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this. I’ve used
5/8” nuts as weights but those aren’t cheap. If this has been discussed in
the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.



Todd Horton













[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Car Weights

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Todd,



I use tire weights for house cars except stock cars. They come in strips of
0.25 oz. self-adhesive lead weights, and they're readily available at auto
parts stores. You break off the number of weights you need for a car, peel
off the backing and stick them to the floor. I've never had one come loose.
For stock cars, I use sheet lead, cut to fit the car, and glued to the floor
with a liberal amount of medium viscosity cyanoacrylate. Sheet lead is
available in various thicknesses by the foot, and I buy the minimum web
order amount, usually 3 or 4 sq. ft. at a time from Rotometals. The cost of
sheet lead is about 35 cents per car, depending upon the thickness you use
(1/16, 3/32, or 1/8 in.). Sheet lead is also useful for hoppers and
gondolas. I use lead shot in the center sill space for flat cars.



Nelson Moyer







From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, January 16, 2015 9:21 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Car Weights





I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided
cars? I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this. I've used
5/8" nuts as weights but those aren't cheap. If this has been discussed in
the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.



Todd Horton


Re: Car Weights

NHJJ4@...
 

  Todd,
 
 I use the stick on wheel wt. Can buy a big box from the likes of Pep Boys. I use the 1/4 oz section. Each stick is 3 oz and there are 48 in a box. That is a lot less than the name brand hi priced spread.
 Last box I got I think was $10.00 maybe a bit more.
 
 Jim Evans
 

In a message dated 1/16/2015 7:22:26 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided cars?  I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this.  I’ve used 5/8” nuts as weights but those aren’t cheap. If this has been discussed in the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.

Todd Horton


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: Ye Old X29 and the X29 Challenge Car (UNCLASSIFIED)

Scott H. Haycock
 

Martin Lofton Wrote an article on the X29b in the Dec. 1992 issue of M.M. It has side views of 3 different paint jobs; a small circle keystone, a large shadow keystone, and a merchandise service paint scheme.  

Scott Haycock


 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Arved;

The challenge is not the build, it is in the paint and lettering. Are you game?

Elden Gatwood



Re: Car Weights

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Sheet lead from chimney flashing is one I use. Cut to size with scissors or shears (if you have them). Try not to sand it or letting kids play with it as lead accumulates in the body and can lead to developmental problems for kids if absorbed/ingested in sufficient quantities by them. But it should be safe in most weighting applications. Tire balancing weights are harder to find, but another option.

A final option I have used is pennies, although newer ones are getting lighter and not as cost effective.

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad

On Jan 16, 2015, at 10:21 PM, 'Todd Horton' toddchorton@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided cars?  I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this.  I’ve used 5/8” nuts as weights but those aren’t cheap. If this has been discussed in the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.

 

Todd Horton

 

 

 

 


Re: New Broadway Limited UP 4-12-2

Tony Thompson
 

Arved Grass wrote:

 

Marty (last name?) had his O-scale 4-12-2s on display at Cocoa beach. He was especially proud (rightfully so) of his model with the triple Walshearts valve gear. I noticed the timing issue as well, and asked him about it . . .


      Arved, the whole point of three-cylinder power was to provide three piston thrusts per driver revolution, rather than just two, evening out the loading on the entire running gear. Obviously these thrusts were made to be as close as possible to being equally spaced. But arrangements like the Gresley, with an inclined cylinder, the angle of inclination of the crank had be added to one side and subtracted from the other, to get equally spaced thrusts in time. This was not necessary with the triple Walschaerts gear, and cranks on those engines were indeed at 120 degrees. Bot Church explains this very clearly in his book.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Car Weights

Dennis Williams
 

16 pennies weight about the same as the two nuts do. 
Dennis Williams/Owner


On Friday, January 16, 2015 10:22 PM, "'Todd Horton' toddchorton@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided cars?  I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this.  I’ve used 5/8” nuts as weights but those aren’t cheap. If this has been discussed in the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.
 
Todd Horton
 
 
 
 



Car Weights

Todd Horton
 

I was wondering what other modelers are using for car weights on close sided cars?  I am looking at the most cost effective for doing this.  I’ve used 5/8” nuts as weights but those aren’t cheap. If this has been discussed in the past, I missed it, I apologize for the replay.

 

Todd Horton

 

 

 

 


Re: New Broadway Limited UP 4-12-2

arved_grass
 

Marty (last name?) had his O-scale 4-12-2s on display at Cocoa beach. He was especially proud (rightfully so) of his model with the triple Walshearts valve gear. I noticed the timing issue as well, and asked him about it. He pulled out drawings. The outboard cylinders were, indeed, 90 degrees out of phase with each other, as a conventional locomotive would be. The inner and engineer side valve motion were off only by the angle that the middle cylinder was tilted up so that the connecting rod to the #2 driver could clear the #1 driver.

I believe the Gresley valve gear as used on most 3 cylinder locomotives requires a nominal 120 degree offset. I say nomiinal, because with the center cylinder tipped up for the connecting rod to clear the #1 cylinder, there has to be a similar phase differential. This accounted for the SP's 4-10-2s to be called "Stuttering Dec's." See Robert Chruch's recent book, "Southern Pacific Ten-Coupled Locomotives" published by Signature Press. If it weren't for the tipped-up center cylinder, the pistons could all be perfectly 120 degrees out of phase, and the locomotive would have an even exhaust note (just like, say, vintage 1970s 3 cylinder motorcycles, like the Triumph Trident, Yamaha XS 750, and various Kawasaki and Suzuki 2-stroke triples).

I was very impressed by Marty's work. The two Walshearts valve gears working side by side on the engineer's side was a mechanical tour de force! It was difficult to pull off in O-scale, and discussing it with him, if it could be done in HO, it would require a master watchmaker. to do it as well.

I'll leave it to those who know more about these UP locomotives, but I'm also puzzled by the inner and engineers side pistons being so close in phase with each other, and the dynamic augment that must have resulted. They must have pounded the heck out of the trackage!

Arved Grass
Arved_Grass@yahoo.com or Arved@I-Do-Photography.com
Fleming Island, Florida


Re: Des Plaines Hobby exclusive run of Intermountain NWX reefers

Walter Cox
 

Recently there were 2 of the above HO reefer kits listed on ebay which sold for rather high prices. My bid was not high enough and I was wondering if there is any chance they will be offered again by Des Plaines Hobby or if there was a period of exclusivity which has expired. If the later, could someone let me know which of the stock Intermountain cars would make the best starting point and the extent of any mods necessary to arrive at an accurate model.


Re: Ye Old X29

arved_grass
 

Again, I think list will clear up what Red Caboose produced, and what models they may or may not be accurate for:

http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/modeling/proto%20kits/x2923aramain.html

If that spreadsheet needs to be corrected, then let's get it corrected. Nearly 13 years after that list was produced, can we settle the ???? in the list?

Lastly (wrell, for this message at least), it looks to me like the Red Caboose/Intermountain models render the Train Miniature/Walthers X29 pretty much obsolete. Is that a fair assumption? (There I go with another of my now infamous assumptions!)

Arved Grass
Arved_Grass@yahoo.com or Arved@I-Do-Photography.com
Fleming Island, Florida

--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 1/16/15, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@comcast.net [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


RE: [STMFC] Ye Old X29
Friday, January 16, 2015 8:25 PM
Mark as Unread Flag this message

From:
"Tim O'Connor timboconnor@comcast.net [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
To:
STMFC@yahoogroups.com

Full Headers Printable View

David Thompson wrote

> '23 was the original proposal that was voted down. B&O's original class M26 (no suffix)
> was built to that spec, but everything else was derived from the revised '24 specs.
> As for the RC kits, 7002 is the original X29 from 1924 (also B&O M26B).
> 7001 is the revised rivet pattern for the side sheets, plus the Dreadnaught ends used on
> the X29s built in the early 1930s. Kitbashing the plate ends from 7002 onto 7001 will get
> you a late '20s X29.
> 7003 is the ARA 1924 design (B&O M26A, C, D, etc. and not the same as the early X29).


I'm not sure you got all those facts straight David. But perhaps it's just the way you
worded the message. Here are two reposts from Chris Barkan from long ago and far away,
i.e. from the old and forgotten Freight Car List

Bottom line, I'm pretty sure Red Caboose only did the 1923 ARA, 1924 X29 & 1928 X29 designs.
And they also did the 1928 X29 with dreadnaught ends.


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Re: Ace Hardware's "Two-Ton Epoxy"

Richard Dermody <ddermody@...>
 

Andy,

The white Devcon epoxy, number 31345,  has apparently been replaced with the clear Devcon 2 Ton Epoxy, product number 35345. I just bought some a few weeks ago at a Tru-Value hardware store and according to the Devcon web site, it's also available at Tru-Value (and some other stores) in California. They also list other sizes, including a 9 oz package.

So, if the color wasn't critical, it appears you can still get the product you liked.

Dick

On Jan 16, 2015, at 6:11 PM, Andy Carlson midcentury@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Bill mentions a really great product. Like a lot of things we have become fond of over the years, sometimes they just fall off the market. I have never found a glass cleaner product for washing auto windshields even close to Glass Wax. Glass Wax, formerly a Johnson Co. product was sold and the new company let it expire. I found a close substitute, ironically an Ace Hardware glass cleaner/polish.

The ceramic filled Devcon white 2-ton epoxy remains a nearly perfect product. It has strength, smoothness, little to zero shrinkage and bonds well to many materials. I use it to fill in flush windows on cabooses without any sanding by following a basic cool technique utilizing scotch tape. It sands well, and I use it for filling both resin and plastic models imperfections. I cringe when thinking about using Squadren green or 3M puttys because of how much poorer these products are for surface filling.

Like a lot of missing items, I have been unable to find Devcon white 2-ton for over 5 years now. Fortunately, Ace has a "2-ton epoxy" which is very similar, if not exactly the same as Devcon. But that is now getting harder to find. I now use Ace "waterproof epoxy" which is also really good and still broadly available. If this gets hard to find, J-B Weld epoxy works well and is found at any auto parts store. It is a dark gray.

All  of the above mentioned products requires hours to cure, but as Bill mentions, the working time is quite generous.

For casting model parts I have found 2-ton epoxy to be a great material. It takes the detail as well as the polyurethanes, down to replicating the MEK shine from the original patterns. I have some N scale F-unit open cavity molds which I can cast thin shell bodies from without an inner mold. The paste thickness allows casting a side laying the mold on its side. Rotate the mold 90 degrees and pour the roof. Stand the mold up on end and do the nose.

If a less viscous epoxy is needed, the epoxy thins really well with isopropy alcohol with no observable weakening of the cured part. Epoxy can also make small parts from a single-use mold such as modeling clay pressed over a detail. If carefully removed from the pattern a small mixture of epoxy can make great parts. This is a fine way to get into owner-casting of hobby parts. You could go to Michael's craft stores to buy a product called "Amazing Mold Putty". This is a 50-50 mix of 2 components which is slightly less viscous than silly putty. It is stiff enough to often avoiding making a mold box. I have the Rock Island 16100 Shake N Take Athearn donor car providing the replicated shape mold non-destructively.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


From: "fgexbill@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, January 16, 2015 2:45 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Ace Hardware's "Two-Ton Epoxy"

 
Over the years after several frustrating attempts to use Epoxy to attach vulnerable parts, Andy Carlson alerted me to Ace Hardware's "Two-Ton Epoxy." Over the past several years I have never has a problem with this product and used it today to attach a "Triple Valve Protective Plate" to a VGN SS boxcar and fill in the Coupler Screw holes on an underframe that I miss-drilled. Great stuff, never fails to harden, it is slow working allowing plenty of time to work. I don't use anything labeled "Fast" or "Quick" except for CA.

I highly recommend this product! Thank you Andy!

Bill Welch.



Re: Ye Old X29

Tim O'Connor
 

David Thompson wrote

  > '23 was the original proposal that was voted down. B&O's original class M26 (no suffix)
  > was built to that spec, but everything else was derived from the revised '24 specs.
  > As for the RC kits, 7002 is the original X29 from 1924 (also B&O M26B).
  > 7001 is the revised rivet pattern for the side sheets, plus the Dreadnaught ends used on
  > the X29s built in the early 1930s. Kitbashing the plate ends from 7002 onto 7001 will get
  > you a late '20s X29.
  > 7003 is the ARA 1924 design (B&O M26A, C, D, etc. and not the same as the early X29).


I'm not sure you got all those facts straight David. But perhaps it's just the way you
worded the message. Here are two reposts from Chris Barkan from long ago and far away,
i.e. from the old and forgotten Freight Car List

Bottom line, I'm pretty sure Red Caboose only did the 1923 ARA, 1924 X29 & 1928 X29 designs.
And they also did the 1928 X29 with dreadnaught ends.

====================================================================================
Repost #1 from Chris Barkan
====================================================================================

ARA 1923 Steel Boxcar Students,

Last fall when the RC ARA design boxcar question was emerging I tried to
sort things out with Richard and Byron using the following diagrams.
They may be helpful to modelers interested in the cars currently being
released.

At the end of this post I have a table that summarizes my understanding
of which railroads had which.  This listing may be incomplete, but
remember, RDG's, and I think N&W's cars were taller than the ARA height.
I don't remember the ERIE cars but I think they were somehow different
too. The SAL cars definitely were different as someone else stated.
I would welcome any corrections to the table.

Following are some simple diagrams of the different rivet/seam patterns
for the ARA 1923 steel boxcar design, AKA X-29 below.  The ">" notation
below indicates which panel overlaps the adjacent panel with 5 being
the inner-most panel (adjacent to the door) and 1 being the panel at the
end of the car.

The vertical column of ":" indicates the panel seam rivets,

the vertical column of "|" indicates the seam,
 
the vertical column of "." indicates the second row of rivets attaching
 the panel to the vertical structural member.

                   Panel Number
          5       4        3        2        1
       ____    ___      ____     ___      ____
           : |.     : |.     : |.    . : |     |
           : |.     : |.     : |.    . : |     |  
           : |.     : |.     : |.    . : |     |
       ____: |.___  : |.____ : |.___ . : |____ |

#1) Early PRR "In Style"  Red Caboose 1924

Panel 5>4>3>2>1
       ____    ____     ____    _____     ____
           |: .     |: .     |: .    . : |     |
           |: .     |: .     |: .    . : |     | 
           |: .     |: .     |: .    . : |     |
       ____|:  ____ |:  ____ |  _____    |____ |
 
 #2) Late PRR "Out Style"  Red Caboose 1928

Panel 5<4<3<2>1
       ____    _____     ___     ____    ____
           : |.      : |.    : |.    : |.     |
           : |.      : |.    : |.    : |.     |   
           : |.      : |.    : |.    : |.     |
       ____: |._____ : |.___ : |.____: |. ___ |

#3) ARA 1923 design, used by B&O, & others (see below)

Panel 5>4>3>2>1

Even without a discussion of which panels overlap which, the main thing
that distinguishes the two PRR styles (#1 & #2 above) from the ARA style
(#3 above) is that neither of the PRR styles have the second row of
rivets (non-seam row) in panel 1.  In fact I think this rivet pattern
is all that distinguishes the PRR 1924 style (#1 above) from the "ARA"
style (#3 above). I believe these two have the same seam overlap pattern,
the only difference is in the placement of the second (non-seam) row
of rivets on panel 2 on the PRR 1924 design, whereas the second row
is on panel 1 on the ARA  style.

Based on a quick survey of Byron's photos I think that we concluded
the following RRs had cars of the 3 side designs as follows (ignoring
roof, end and UF designs).

Side Design Type

#1) PRR 1924: PRR, B&O (M-26B), W&LE > NKP

#2) PRR 1928: PRR (w/both flat & Dreadnaught ends)

#3) ARA 1923: B&O, (M-26, M-26A, M-26C, M-26D, M-26E), B&M, CNJ, Ga. Northern, LNE, MEC

====================================================================================
Repost #2 from Chris Barkan
====================================================================================

Red Caboose is manufacturing its X-29/ARA 1923 boxcars with two different
underframes.  One with a 5' kingpin to striker spacing and another with the
5'6" spacing.  The 5' spacing is what is included with the M-26A kits
currently on the market and is correct for these cars.  Later, they plan to
produce these cars with a UF with the 5'6" spacing which will be correct for
the B&O M-26C subclass.

RC had to make one compromise on the current ARA boxcar models.  The body
casting has the 4  rivets that attach each body bolster to the sides located
at the 5'6" spacing, but as I said above, the UF for the B&O M-26A cars has
the 5' spacing.  Consequently, when viewed in profile, these 4 rivets are 6"
out alignment with the body bolster.  Again, most modelers will probably not
care about this discrepancy, and for those that do, it is probably not a hard
fix  Preserving the lettering and restoring the paint in that area will be a
small challenge, but there is always weathering to hide sins!


New Broadway Limited UP 4-12-2

benjamin
 

I just saw Broadway's video showing their new UP 4-12-2 model.  It looks beautiful and I hope they sell a lot of them.  They also say they have it set up for three cylinder sound.  The video does show the locomotive in slow enough motion that you can count 6 exhaust beats per revolution.

However, and there is always a however, the six chuffs per revolution in the part where you can count them are equally spaced as if the drivers and the center cylinder are equally "hexed"  when all of the UP 4-10-2's and 4-12-2's and the SP 4-10-2's were actually quartered like their 2 cylinder cousins with the third cylinder timed at an angle in between two quartered power strokes.  Check a copy of "Three Barrels of Steam" for drawings indicating the proper angle. 

Old timers that operated these engines said they sounded like they were stuttering as they went down the track and the ride took a little getting used to because the power strokes were not at an even pace.

I hope I'm wrong about this, but getting the chuffs synced correctly is very important to me.  I hope someone can view these models in persons and report back about this, especially if I am wrong.

Ben Heinley
Denver, Colorado


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Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: (was Athearn) container gondolas (UNCLAS

RICH CHAPIN
 

Tables of Containers from LCL Corp







Rich Chapin

27 Quincy Rd

Basking Ridge, NJ 07920-2222


Re: Ace Hardware's "Two-Ton Epoxy"

Andy Carlson
 

Bill mentions a really great product. Like a lot of things we have become fond of over the years, sometimes they just fall off the market. I have never found a glass cleaner product for washing auto windshields even close to Glass Wax. Glass Wax, formerly a Johnson Co. product was sold and the new company let it expire. I found a close substitute, ironically an Ace Hardware glass cleaner/polish.

The ceramic filled Devcon white 2-ton epoxy remains a nearly perfect product. It has strength, smoothness, little to zero shrinkage and bonds well to many materials. I use it to fill in flush windows on cabooses without any sanding by following a basic cool technique utilizing scotch tape. It sands well, and I use it for filling both resin and plastic models imperfections. I cringe when thinking about using Squadren green or 3M puttys because of how much poorer these products are for surface filling.

Like a lot of missing items, I have been unable to find Devcon white 2-ton for over 5 years now. Fortunately, Ace has a "2-ton epoxy" which is very similar, if not exactly the same as Devcon. But that is now getting harder to find. I now use Ace "waterproof epoxy" which is also really good and still broadly available. If this gets hard to find, J-B Weld epoxy works well and is found at any auto parts store. It is a dark gray.

All  of the above mentioned products requires hours to cure, but as Bill mentions, the working time is quite generous.

For casting model parts I have found 2-ton epoxy to be a great material. It takes the detail as well as the polyurethanes, down to replicating the MEK shine from the original patterns. I have some N scale F-unit open cavity molds which I can cast thin shell bodies from without an inner mold. The paste thickness allows casting a side laying the mold on its side. Rotate the mold 90 degrees and pour the roof. Stand the mold up on end and do the nose.

If a less viscous epoxy is needed, the epoxy thins really well with isopropy alcohol with no observable weakening of the cured part. Epoxy can also make small parts from a single-use mold such as modeling clay pressed over a detail. If carefully removed from the pattern a small mixture of epoxy can make great parts. This is a fine way to get into owner-casting of hobby parts. You could go to Michael's craft stores to buy a product called "Amazing Mold Putty". This is a 50-50 mix of 2 components which is slightly less viscous than silly putty. It is stiff enough to often avoiding making a mold box. I have the Rock Island 16100 Shake N Take Athearn donor car providing the replicated shape mold non-destructively.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


From: "fgexbill@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, January 16, 2015 2:45 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Ace Hardware's "Two-Ton Epoxy"

 
Over the years after several frustrating attempts to use Epoxy to attach vulnerable parts, Andy Carlson alerted me to Ace Hardware's "Two-Ton Epoxy." Over the past several years I have never has a problem with this product and used it today to attach a "Triple Valve Protective Plate" to a VGN SS boxcar and fill in the Coupler Screw holes on an underframe that I miss-drilled. Great stuff, never fails to harden, it is slow working allowing plenty of time to work. I don't use anything labeled "Fast" or "Quick" except for CA.

I highly recommend this product! Thank you Andy!

Bill Welch
 



Re: Container gons from NKP (UNCLASSIFIED)

william darnaby
 

The NKP cars were used to carry dolomite from Basic Refractories at Narlo, Ohio to the mills in the Pittsburgh area.



Bill Darnaby



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, January 16, 2015 11:13 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Container gons from NKP (UNCLASSIFIED)








https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/12297246976/sizes/k/in/photostream/

This beauty of a photo from the Barriger collection shows two NKP container gons at PG tower at the junction of the Port Perry Branch and Monongahela Division of the PRR. Note the gons carry eleven, not twelve containers: 4 over each truck and three placed oddly in the center (one has them crosswise, one front-to-back)

. I suspect they are carrying either powdered limestone or powdered dolomite, as this yard served several steel mills, including USS's Duquesne Works, off photo to right (east). Tremendous photo.

Elden Gatwood

That's a great photo Eldon. Unless there is some serious foreshortening from the camera, the containers in the car on the right are not all the same size. The containers middle (cross wise) appeare to be about 2/3rds the capacity of the others. I would support this guess by asking why the crane operators would have loaded them sideways--unless there they are a different commodity.

Montford Switzer did an article to freelance container cars in RMC in the early 90's and had prototype photos, including a car from the Missouri and Illinois (Missouri Pacific.

Michael Seitz
Missoula MT







____________________________________________________________
NetZero now offers 4G mobile broadband. Sign up now. <http://www.netzero.net/?refcd=NZINTISP0512T4GOUT1>


Ace Hardware's "Two-Ton Epoxy"

Bill Welch
 

Over the years after several frustrating attempts to use Epoxy to attach vulnerable parts, Andy Carlson alerted me to Ace Hardware's "Two-Ton Epoxy." Over the past several years I have never has a problem with this product and used it today to attach a "Triple Valve Protective Plate" to a VGN SS boxcar and fill in the Coupler Screw holes on an underframe that I miss-drilled. Great stuff, never fails to harden, it is slow working allowing plenty of time to work. I don't use anything labeled "Fast" or "Quick" except for CA.


I highly recommend this product! Thank you Andy!


Bill Welch

 

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