Date   

Re: Chartrand's Hollywood Tank Cars

O Fenton Wells
 

The Tam O'Shanter, I have eaten there many times.  I used to go to LA on business and my distributor usually took us there for lunch. Good memories.

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: Car Weights

Todd Horton
 

Wow, I was wondering if there were any bad side effects from using lead.  There has been some great responses to this thread.   Todd Horton

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, January 18, 2015 3:55 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Car Weights

 

 

On Sat Jan 17, 2015 12:12 am (PST), Jim Betz wrote

 

I've used lead sheet, lead shot, car weights (lead), nuts (steel), pennies ... just about anything that is 'heavy'. If I have to shape or cut the weight - I use lead because it is fast and easy. If what I'm using fits the space ... then I'll use just about anything that is heavy. If you use depleted uranium it can recharge the luminescence of the numbers on your watch.

If I need 'cut to fit' I use sheet lead. When doing the underside of a flat car I put a layer of lead shot 'where ever it will fit'. When
adding weight to a leading/trailing truck I cut small pieces of sheet lead and glue it to the underside. When doing hoppers
that have a load I add the weight before the load.

 

Lead also has the advantage that it can be drilled, cut with scissors or a hobby knife, etc. I don't ever file it (fills up the file immediately) ... but you can scrape it with the back side of your hobby knife and 'wear it down' as needed.

My most common adhesive for all weight jobs is "some form of white glue" (Elmers, Elmers Carpenter, Krystal Klear). I
wouldn't use CA/acc for this work ... ever. First its too expensive and second I hate it and avoid it at all costs. (Yes, there are some jobs where CA is required.)

 

One of the great advantages of the white glues is that they can be softened with a few drops of water - just in case you need to rework.

 

Be careful using white glue with lead if you live in a damp climate. It's an acetate and will react with water vapour to form acetic acid (vinegar) which reacts with lead to form lead acetate which has a larger volume than lead oxide or metallic lead. Consequently your weight will increase in volume with potentially disastrous results. I live in Botswana which has a very dry climate and have never had any problem although I have used white glue to stick lead shot etc into cars for years. However modellers in Britain, which has a notoriously damp climate, have had serious problems and seen valuable brass locomotives destroyed due to this cause. 

 

I would suggest that if you choose to use white glue to add weight to freight cars (it has all the advantages Jim cites) then glue it in a position where it has plenty of space to expand or swell and avoid using it in seriously valuable cars or in brass locomotives. Glueing lead shot or lead sheet underneath the car is the safest bet.

 

Richard White

 


Re: Car Weights

Richard White
 

On Sat Jan 17, 2015 12:12 am (PST), Jim Betz wrote
 
I've used lead sheet, lead shot, car weights (lead), nuts (steel), pennies ... just about anything that is 'heavy'. If I have to shape or cut the weight - I use lead because it is fast and easy. If what I'm using fits the space ... then I'll use just about anything that is heavy. If you use depleted uranium it can recharge the luminescence of the numbers on your watch.

If I need 'cut to fit' I use sheet lead. When doing the underside of a flat car I put a layer of lead shot 'where ever it will fit'. When
adding weight to a leading/trailing truck I cut small pieces of sheet lead and glue it to the underside. When doing hoppers
that have a load I add the weight before the load.
 
Lead also has the advantage that it can be drilled, cut with scissors or a hobby knife, etc. I don't ever file it (fills up the file immediately) ... but you can scrape it with the back side of your hobby knife and 'wear it down' as needed.

My most common adhesive for all weight jobs is "some form of white glue" (Elmers, Elmers Carpenter, Krystal Klear). I
wouldn't use CA/acc for this work ... ever. First its too expensive and second I hate it and avoid it at all costs. (Yes, there are some jobs where CA is required.)
 
One of the great advantages of the white glues is that they can be softened with a few drops of water - just in case you need to rework.
 
Be careful using white glue with lead if you live in a damp climate. It's an acetate and will react with water vapour to form acetic acid (vinegar) which reacts with lead to form lead acetate which has a larger volume than lead oxide or metallic lead. Consequently your weight will increase in volume with potentially disastrous results. I live in Botswana which has a very dry climate and have never had any problem although I have used white glue to stick lead shot etc into cars for years. However modellers in Britain, which has a notoriously damp climate, have had serious problems and seen valuable brass locomotives destroyed due to this cause. 
 
I would suggest that if you choose to use white glue to add weight to freight cars (it has all the advantages Jim cites) then glue it in a position where it has plenty of space to expand or swell and avoid using it in seriously valuable cars or in brass locomotives. Glueing lead shot or lead sheet underneath the car is the safest bet.
 
Richard White
 


Re: Chartrand’s Hollywood Tank Cars

Richard Townsend
 

About ten years ago Ted Culotta was talking about doing decals for Chartrand tank cars, but I don't know if anything came of it.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sat, Jan 17, 2015 6:33 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Chartrand’s Hollywood Tank Cars

 
A fellow modeler shared some freight car photos with me that included single- and two-dome tank cars bearing the name “Chartrand’s Hollywood” and carrying the reporting marks CHAX. Apparently this was a leasing company that also used CFPX reporting marks.
 
Does anyone know more about this company?
 
Thanks.
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Re: Chartrand's Hollywood Tank Cars

Paul Koehler
 

Bob:

 

Further on Tony’s reply.  Chartrand’s office was located on Los Feliz Blvd. just down the street from the Tam O’Shanter restaurant.  If I recall from my calls there it was a two or three person operation.  They just leased the cars and did not control any routings so not a lot of sales calls were made to their offices.

 

Paul C. Koehler

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, January 17, 2015 9:48 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Chartrand’s Hollywood Tank Cars

 

 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

 

A fellow modeler shared some freight car photos with me that included single- and two-dome tank cars bearing the name “Chartrand’s Hollywood” and carrying the reporting marks CHAX. Apparently this was a leasing company that also used CFPX reporting marks.

Does anyone know more about this company?

 

    Chartrand Traffic Service purchased tank cars second hand or third hand, and leased them at bargain rates. Their fleet was quite miscellaneous, and often photographed in relatively late times, since they kept some real antiques running for years.

     Model Railroad Hobbyist (the free on-line magazine) has an upcoming article by the late Richard Hendrickson about multi-compartment tank cars, and I know it includes at least one photo of a CHAX car.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...

Publishers of books on railroad history

 

 

 


Re: Car Weights

Andy Harman
 

At 08:32 AM 1/17/2015 -0500, you wrote:
Being the eternal skeptic on this, I try to build my cars with removable floors.
Most of the Branchline, RC, and Intermountain box cars have removable roofs but the floors are part of the body.

As far as using goo on styrene, I won't do it. I have used Barge to hold down etched walkway tread on diesels and roof hatches, but thinned with MEK and just enough to stick it down. I've got Rivarossi cars I gooed weights into decades ago that have developed floor sags years later.

Andy


Re: Chartrand’s Hollywood Tank Cars

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

A fellow modeler shared some freight car photos with me that included single- and two-dome tank cars bearing the name “Chartrand’s Hollywood” and carrying the reporting marks CHAX. Apparently this was a leasing company that also used CFPX reporting marks.
Does anyone know more about this company?

    Chartrand Traffic Service purchased tank cars second hand or third hand, and leased them at bargain rates. Their fleet was quite miscellaneous, and often photographed in relatively late times, since they kept some real antiques running for years.
     Model Railroad Hobbyist (the free on-line magazine) has an upcoming article by the late Richard Hendrickson about multi-compartment tank cars, and I know it includes at least one photo of a CHAX car.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Car Weights

asychis@...
 

Stuck then into the cars with lots of Goo.
 
Bet that is the main reason people have had bad experiences with GOO!  Jerry Michels
 


Re: Car Weights

asychis@...
 

Mike, since none of my models approach 2 tons, I have just passed this adhesive by.  Jerry Michels


Re: New Broadway Limited UP 4-12-2

MDelvec952
 


The 4-12-2s used a Gresley motion to move the valves in the middle cylinder, and a Walschearts motion on the outside cylinders, which were quartered. Gresley connected the piston valves on the outside with a horizontal rod that was fixed about a third of the way across. On the other third was attached a rod that moved the piston-valve on the middle cylinder. As the outside valves were hooked up at speed, that reduction in stroke was automatically transferred to the middle cylinder. Your drawings that show the drivers were quartered makes sense as the recordings I've heard don't suggest and even exhaust beat. The best imitation of the sound from the old timers I've met from that era said that the sound was similar to: "a-washin'-a-sewin'-a-washin'-a-sewin'-a-washin'-a-sewin'-a-washin'-a-sewin'-a-washin'-a-sewin," and universally the ear-witnesses recalled that three-cylinder engines sounded like they were going faster than they were. That cadence agrees with your middle-cylinder fatter exhaust finding. There was an era when designers added the third cylinder as a way to increase tractive effort and horsepower on a given weight-on-drivers, which reduced the need to add locomotives and crews for a given-tonnage train.

 In the United States, the three-cylinder era was for the most part short lived, and many railroads removed the middle cylinder. UP's 4-12-2s were an exception, as were Alton & Southern three-cylinder 0-8-0s.

As for running prototypes, there are three-cylinder Gresley engines alive and well in England, and the brand new A4 4-6-2 locomotive the Brits built from drawings is a three-cylinder Gresley engine. In the 1970s one of the Gesley 4-6-2s, The Flying Scotsman, toured the U.S. fitted with an American Janney coupler and other devices to meet the FRA requirements. These fantripping 4-6-2s won't put on a freight-hauling performance for the purpose of recording, but they do give a sense of the personality of a Gresley motion.

Of the three-cylinder survivors in the U.S., the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia has Baldwin 60,000, a three-cylinder 4-10-2 that uses a double-walschearts, and that locomotive rolls back and forth within the museum. What's unfortunate is that the side with the two cranks is against the wall so it can't be easily seen by the public.

Those UP 4-12-2s were ponderous machines, and in the talks I've had with some of the veteran steam shooters in the East, they all regreted driving past the UP 9000s on trips west to catch the narrow gauge and short line steam that was about to end any day. They all lamented that the narrow gauge they were trying to preserve on film survived, and the main line stuff they ignored is what disappeared first. I've asked them all why did they didn't shoot more freight cars in the steam era.

I can't wait to hear the models.

                 ....Mike Del Vecchio



-----Original Message-----
From: orthsj@... [STMFC]
To: Classic UP
Cc: STMFC
Sent: Sat, Jan 17, 2015 2:38 am
Subject: Re: [Classic_UP] RE: [STMFC] New Broadway Limited UP 4-12-2

 
Gents....

This will be argued far beyond any of our lifetimes, and no matter what sound was picked, *someone* will complain and say its not correct.  There are no running prototypes, so we all have to go on what someone said, what we can analyze from drawings, or analyze from existing recordings.  There is no winning this debate.

The outside cylinder main rods are quartered 90 degrees apart.  I have the drawing for the main drivers, 954CA28251, and the axle keyways are 90 degrees apart.  The center cylinder is aligned with the axle keyway, making it 45 degrees off one of the outside main rods (not sure if it was right or left).  I have the #2 axle and crank drawing, and the #2 driver drawing, which I just looked at again to make sure.  In "The Union Pacific Type, Vol 1", Kratville & Bush, an Alco graph is presented in the first chapter showing evenly spaced power pulses to the drivers, which points to Alco designing the locomotives to have 6 evenly spaced power pulses per revolution.  Between the unevenly spaced crank pins, tilted up center cylinder, shorter stroke, larger bore, and Gresley valve gear they somehow made that happen.  The evenly spaced power pulses was one of Alco's big selling points, which are quoted in Kratville & Bush.  When the valve gear and crank pins and rods got worn, the timing suffered badly.  That is also discussed in the book noted above.  Anyway....

I recommended that the chuffs be timed evenly on the model.  This was based on an time-amplitude analysis that I did on all of the recordings we could get.  The Fogg, Ragsdale and Whyte recordings have been digitized, so doing an analysis was as simple as installing a spectrum analyzer on my computer and analyzing the files.  When I looked at the time-amplitude of the sound, the chuffs were very clearly evenly spaced.  I analyzed multiple 10 second segments (limit of the analysis program) on multiple recordings with the locomotives running at different speeds.

What I did find was that every 3rd chuff had its energy spread across a wider time period.  Probably 1.5 times as wide as the other two chuffs.  Its peak amplitude was also higher.  I suspect that is what makes that chuff sound "out of time", ie, it starts sooner and ends later.  But, it is very clear that the center of the sound is evenly spaced with the other two chuffs.

I, along with several other people (John Bush, Sandy, and others) suspect the difference in sound is due to the differing exhaust path lengths between the cylinders.  The left cylinder has a normal, straight shot to the nozzle.  The center cylinder has a very short path to the nozzle.  The right cylinder exhaust path has to go up and over the center cylinder's valve, so its path is longer and curved.

The BLI sound developer made every 3rd chuff longer and louder, with all chuffs evenly spaced, like the digitized recordings.  Those recordings are the best evidence available, and they are what was used for a reference.

The whistle came from the ex-UP 2-8-0 running in Alamosa, CO.  That whistle is a Star Brass Co 5-chime from a UP 2-10-2, which is what was used on the 4-12-2.  The bell was kind of taken from the Fogg recording, but if you listen to the recording, there's a ton of warble due to the tape recorder having some tape speed issues.  So, it was just a basis for the bell.

So, if you don't like the sound, blame me.  I expected to get plenty of criticism on this.  But, please be aware that BLI wanted to get it right.  They were very genuine in their desire to have it correct.

Steve Orth





Hi Ben,
 
               BLI had their 4-12-2 on display at Prototype Rails in Cocoa Beach, FL.  Since I have been eagerly awaiting these (I have 3 on order), I was very pleased to see it.
 
               The model looked excellent to my eyes (and without any handy photos, etc. to compare it against).
 
               Unfortunately, BLI did not have a test track.  However, the next table to their left was Intermountain Railway Company, and on their right was Atlas, both of whom had tracks.  I decided NOT to ask IMRC if we could use their test track, since IMRC also makes steam engines in HO.  The Atlas rep was happy to allow us to use theirs.  I threatened to post a photo of the 4-12-2 on the Atlas display, so as to start a rumor…
 
               In any case, the engine sounded very good.  It definitely has an off-beat chuff.  My ears are not calibrated, but for my little demo, we also had Steve Orth (who did much of the research for this model), Sandy McCullough, Mike Brock, Marty Magregian, Terry Kolenc, and Frank Peacock.  These esteemed UP experts deemed the sound “very good” and that’s sufficient endorsement for me!  At slow speed, the sound was very well synchronized to the driver rotation.   I also grabbed ahold of the engine, and it seems to have some pulling power.
 
               As I mentioned, I’ve been waiting quite a while for this model to be released.  BLI said that the “soldering was finished” [it’s a brass boiler], and they expect to have them in the spring of 2015.
 
Regards,
 
-Jeff
 
 
 
 
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, January 16, 2015 4:18 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] New Broadway Limited UP 4-12-2
 
 
I just saw Broadway's video showing their new UP 4-12-2 model.  It looks beautiful and I hope they sell a lot of them.  They also say they have it set up for three cylinder sound.  The video does show the locomotive in slow enough motion that you can count 6 exhaust beats per revolution.

However, and there is always a however, the six chuffs per revolution in the part where you can count them are equally spaced as if the drivers and the center cylinder are equally "hexed"  when all of the UP 4-10-2's and 4-12-2's and the SP 4-10-2's were actually quartered like their 2 cylinder cousins with the third cylinder timed at an angle in between two quartered power strokes.  Check a copy of "Three Barrels of Steam" for drawings indicating the proper angle. 

Old timers that operated these engines said they sounded like they were stuttering as they went down the track and the ride took a little getting used to because the power strokes were not at an even pace.

I hope I'm wrong about this, but getting the chuffs synced correctly is very important to me.  I hope someone can view these models in persons and report back about this, especially if I am wrong.

Ben Heinley
Denver, Colorado




Chartrand’s Hollywood Tank Cars

thecitrusbelt@...
 

A fellow modeler shared some freight car photos with me that included single- and two-dome tank cars bearing the name “Chartrand’s Hollywood” and carrying the reporting marks CHAX. Apparently this was a leasing company that also used CFPX reporting marks.

 

Does anyone know more about this company?

 

Thanks.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: [Classic_UP] RE: New Broadway Limited UP 4-12-2

Tony Thompson
 

Tom Hayden wrote:

 

Not all 3 cyl locos used a 120 deg "quartering".   The Baldwin 60000 loco, displayed in the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia used 90 deg for the crank on the driver wheels and put the middle crank evenly between them


But the UP #9000 used 120 deg (or maybe not quite exactly 120 due to the angle of the middle cylinder). I have found  a link to photographic proof that the the UP#9000 is "quartered" around 120. Scroll down about 3/4 of the page until you see about 2 dozen pics of the #9000 at the Rail Giants Museum. The 4th picture is an engineer side view that shows the crank at just past the 9:00 O'clock position, about 15 deg past 9:00 O'clock, i.e. about 15 deg PAST the horizontal position, assuming the loco were moving forward. The ninth picture is from the Fireman side and shows the crank about 15 deg BEFORE vertical, again assuming the loco were moving fwd. This clearly shows the cranks are about 120 deg apart. 

       The Baldwin loco, and other three-cylinder engines which did NOT have Gresley valve gear, could indeed have 90-deg. cranks and a 135-degree crank. But Gresley valve gear permitted the 120-degree arrangement (plus and minus the center cylinder inclination angle). This is all in Bob Church's book, no need to figure it out all over again or to try and interpret photos.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: [Classic_UP] RE: New Broadway Limited UP 4-12-2

hayden_tom@...
 

Not all 3 cyl locos used a 120 deg "quartering".   The Baldwin 60000 loco, displayed in the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia used 90 deg for the crank on the driver wheels and put the middle crank evenly between them

But the UP #9000 used 120 deg (or maybe not quite exactly 120 due to the angle of the middle cylinder). I have found  a link to photographic proof that the the UP#9000 is "quartered" around 120. Scroll down about 3/4 of the page until you see about 2 dozen pics of the #9000 at the Rail Giants Museum. The 4th picture is an engineer side view that shows the crank at just past the 9:00 O'clock position, about 15 deg past 9:00 O'clock, i.e. about 15 deg PAST the horizontal position, assuming the loco were moving forward. The ninth picture is from the Fireman side and shows the crank about 15 deg BEFORE vertical, again assuming the loco were moving fwd. This clearly shows the cranks are about 120 deg apart. 

Union Pacific 9000

 


Tom Hayden


Re: Car Weights

Walter Cox
 

Wow ! Thanks for all the comments guys. I'd say the verdict is unanimous in favor of not risking it. About 50 years ago I discovered what can happen when I attempted to attach a Kemtron all weather brass cab to a filed down plastic cab of a Mantua  Mikado with Goo. It wasn't a pretty sight. I subsequently learned the importance of wicking off the solvent and wondered if it might work if properly wicked. I salvaged some weights recently from some Athearn blue box cars and was impressed with the strength of the joints after many years with no distortion to the styrene. But Athearn weights aren't enclosed within the car body.
 
I won't be using Goo this time. Walt
 
 

In a message dated 1/17/2015 3:19:12 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:
      I strongly recommend keeping Goo well away from ANY styrene material. Even as  a contact cement, the solvent continues to outgas over time and will distort your model. Just do NOT go there. And as full disclosure, no, don't ask me now I know.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.s ignaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: New Broadway Limited UP 4-12-2

Tony Thompson
 

Steve Orth wrote:

 
\This will be argued far beyond any of our lifetimes, and no matter what sound was picked, *someone* will complain and say its not correct.  There are no running prototypes, so we all have to go on what someone said, what we can analyze from drawings, or analyze from existing recordings.  There is no winning this debate.

      I beg to disagree. In fact, Bob Church has researched this in considerable detail (unlike the estimable Mr. Kratville), including time spent at the National Railway Museum in York, where they most certainly DO have operating three-cylinder prototypes, and he spent time learning from the mechanical people there at the museum. All of Bob's findings are in his recent book about SP’s Gresley-gear engines (entitled "SP Ten-coupled Locomotives"). I have forwarded Steve's email to Bob, who likely will reply to Steve.

What I did find was that every 3rd chuff had its energy spread across a wider time period.  Probably 1.5 times as wide as the other two chuffs.  Its peak amplitude was also higher.  I suspect that is what makes that chuff sound "out of time", ie, it starts sooner and ends later.  But, it is very clear that the center of the sound is evenly spaced with the other two chuffs.

      Sorry, Steve, this is not correct, as Bob probably will explain to you, and as he lays out in the book.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: [Classic_UP] RE: New Broadway Limited UP 4-12-2

Bud Rindfleisch
 

The British modelers seem to have gotten the three cylinder sounds down right as a lot of their 1:1 steam used three cylinders. I'm not sure of the manufacturers of their OO models and I don't have any links to share at the moment, but I think there are some vids on You Tube.
   Bud Rindfleisch


Re: Car Weights

asychis@...
 

Pierre,  that is my source of weights too.  Many years ago a gun shop went out of business in Amarillo and I bought boxes and boxes of black powder "bullets" of various sizes for pennies on the dollar.  They work great, I can easily add a specific amount of weight, and probably have a good 25 pounds left after 20 years. 
 
As to a favorite adhesive, I have used gap-filling CA for many years without problems. The key to me seems to use what the manufacturer recommends, a very small amount.
 
Jerry Michels.


Re: Car Weights

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 1/17/2015 3:55 PM, Lester Breuer frograbbit602@... [STMFC] wrote:
metal punch outs from metal electrical boxes 
Problem is they are steel!
   

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Car Weights

Dennis Williams
 

The best thing to mount the weights for me is GE Clear Silicone II.  I use a gun and tube.   
Dennis Williams/Owner


On Saturday, January 17, 2015 7:20 PM, "ron.merrick@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Mee too.  CB&T cars, built the year they were first produced, or perhaps the year after.  Fabulous stainless weight.

Stuck then into the cars with lots of Goo.

Five years later they all bowed in the middle.  But by that time I had figured out how hard it was to make a CB&T car look good, so I didn't care that much.

Yes, I harvested all the stainless weights that were in the inventory of cars I had.  The rest of the contents of those boxes went into the recycle bin.  The weights are now used to hold down the roofwalks of Branchline cars while the cement dries.  Sort of like the three former Fairbanks-Morse locomotives which have been  turned into flatcars to carry ingots at the former Cameron forge shop in Houston.

Ron Merrick



Re: Car Weights

mopacfirst
 

Mee too.  CB&T cars, built the year they were first produced, or perhaps the year after.  Fabulous stainless weight.

Stuck then into the cars with lots of Goo.

Five years later they all bowed in the middle.  But by that time I had figured out how hard it was to make a CB&T car look good, so I didn't care that much.

Yes, I harvested all the stainless weights that were in the inventory of cars I had.  The rest of the contents of those boxes went into the recycle bin.  The weights are now used to hold down the roofwalks of Branchline cars while the cement dries.  Sort of like the three former Fairbanks-Morse locomotives which have been  turned into flatcars to carry ingots at the former Cameron forge shop in Houston.

Ron Merrick

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