Date   

Re: Kadee roofwalks

Rob & Bev Manley
 

I have used Aileens flexible craft glue for all my roofwalks, Kadee, and etched. I also use it on my metal weights.

 

Sincerely,

Rob Manley

Midwest Mod-U-Trak

"Better modeling through personal embarassment"

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, January 18, 2015 9:13 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Kadee roofwalks

 

 

Cheers 

           

              Chuck i have canopy cement will give it a go.

 

Paul Doggett UK

 

 

 

 

Sent from Samsung mobile


"RUTLANDRS@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Paul,

 

    In the past, barge cement and canopy glue have been suggested.

 

Chuck Hladik

 

In a message dated 1/18/2015 9:56:09 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:

 

Apart from drilling holes in the car roof has anyone any suggestions for fixing Kadee roof walks to a plastic car roof.

Thanks in advance.

Paul Doggett UK

 

 

 

 

Sent from Samsung mobile


Re: Prototype Rails - Cocoa Beach Photos Posted

Rhbale@...
 

Thanks for posting Dave.
 
Richard Bale
 
 


Re: [Shake_N_Take] drop run ladders - a better way?

Craig Zeni
 

I'm ornery. I want them all drilled for robustness...so I drilled them all. What I ended up using was the foil off the top of a bottle of scotch whiskey; I think it was Glenmorangie...cut to width, drilled using the jig that comes in the Tichy box car kits. The foil is more like a thin lead sheet so it's not too delicate but is more malleable than Greg's beloved pie tin material :)

Craig Zeni
Cary NC

On Jan 18, 2015, at 9:17 PM, TGREGMRTN@AOL.COM [Shake_N_Take] wrote:



Rob,

I will give you my solution and Craig Zeni has another and Schuyler Larrabee has another.

I used a jig to create the holes as they need to be the same on the sides as the ends. For the styles I used a thicker Aluminum foil. This left me with a nice thin style. The real secret is to NOT drill holes for both sides of the drop grabs, dill only one and clip the run shot to match the opposing side. This eliminates the possibility of the grabs from becoming crooked.

I am sure there are other solutions and Schuyler did use styrene.


Greg Martin

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean

In a message dated 1/18/2015 4:43:59 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, STMFC@yahoogroups.com writes:

I’m slowly working through the 2014 Shake and Take project and have come up against the end ladders. I’m looking for suggestions others have tried to improve the looks of the finished product. Mine come out looking like the years have service included a couple of collisions.

The approach I’ve tried is to mark the ladder styles on a sheet of .015” thick styrene, including both vertical and horizontal centre lines for each hole to be drilled. Then use a pin to create a dimple at each +, and drill through with an #80 bit. I find it hard to create a dimple in the material at the exact correct spot, so my drilled holes are imperfect. The pin is thick enough and creates enough shadow that it looks like it is on the +, but it is imprecise.

Is there a better idea? Maybe a jig that is practical?


Re: drop run ladders - a better way?

Greg Martin
 

Rob,
 
I will give you my solution and Craig Zeni has another and Schuyler Larrabee has another.
 
I used a jig to create the holes as they need to be the same on the sides as the ends. For the styles I used a thicker Aluminum foil. This left me with a nice thin style. The real secret is to NOT drill holes for both sides of the drop grabs, dill only one and clip the run shot to match the opposing side. This eliminates the possibility of the grabs from becoming crooked.
 
I am sure there are other solutions and Schuyler did use styrene.
 
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 1/18/2015 4:43:59 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

I’m slowly working through the 2014 Shake and Take project and have come up against the end ladders.   I’m looking for suggestions others have tried to improve the looks of the finished product.  Mine come out looking like the years have service included a couple of collisions.
 
The approach I’ve tried is to mark the ladder styles on a sheet of .015” thick styrene, including both vertical and horizontal centre lines for each hole to be drilled.  Then use a pin to create a dimple at each +, and drill through with an #80 bit.  I find it hard to create a dimple in the material at the exact correct spot,  so my drilled holes are imperfect.  The pin is thick enough and creates enough shadow that it looks like it is on the +, but it is imprecise.
 
Is there a better idea?  Maybe a jig that is practical?
 
Rob Kirkham
 
 
 
 


Re: drop rung ladders - a better way?

Robert kirkham
 

sorry – drop rung, not run.
 
Rob
 

Sent: Sunday, January 18, 2015 4:43 PM
Subject: [STMFC] drop run ladders - a better way?
 


I’m slowly working through the 2014 Shake and Take project and have come up against the end ladders.   I’m looking for suggestions others have tried to improve the looks of the finished product.  Mine come out looking like the years have service included a couple of collisions.
 
The approach I’ve tried is to mark the ladder styles on a sheet of .015” thick styrene, including both vertical and horizontal centre lines for each hole to be drilled.  Then use a pin to create a dimple at each +, and drill through with an #80 bit.  I find it hard to create a dimple in the material at the exact correct spot,  so my drilled holes are imperfect.  The pin is thick enough and creates enough shadow that it looks like it is on the +, but it is imprecise.
 
Is there a better idea?  Maybe a jig that is practical?
 
Rob Kirkham
 
 
 
 


drop run ladders - a better way?

Robert kirkham
 

I’m slowly working through the 2014 Shake and Take project and have come up against the end ladders.   I’m looking for suggestions others have tried to improve the looks of the finished product.  Mine come out looking like the years have service included a couple of collisions.
 
The approach I’ve tried is to mark the ladder styles on a sheet of .015” thick styrene, including both vertical and horizontal centre lines for each hole to be drilled.  Then use a pin to create a dimple at each +, and drill through with an #80 bit.  I find it hard to create a dimple in the material at the exact correct spot,  so my drilled holes are imperfect.  The pin is thick enough and creates enough shadow that it looks like it is on the +, but it is imprecise.
 
Is there a better idea?  Maybe a jig that is practical?
 
Rob Kirkham
 
 
 
 


Prototype Rails - Cocoa Beach Photos Posted

dh30973
 

I finally got my images processed from this years meet

 

http://www.pbase.com/dh30973/cocoa2015&page=all

 

Dave Hussey


Re: SS 50' box - looking for prototype

Eric Lombard
 

Rich, do the posts and braces form a Howe or Pratt truss?
Eric Lombard
Homewood, IL


On Sunday, January 18, 2015, richgibson89@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

All,


I have an HO model that I assembled from a wood kit a number of years ago but never lettered because the decals disintegrated. Looking at it now, it's a nice car but it is clear from the 1955 ORER that the lettering diagrams provided with the kit do not correspond to prototype examples of this car. The kit was manufactured by Quality Craft Models and distributed by Bev-Bel. Unfortunately, I cannot find a picture of this model online to provide a link to, so I will try to describe the car below:

- External dimensions: length 51', height rails to top of roofwalk 15', width 10'

- Single sheathed with 'z' braces; 2 diagonals left of doors, 3 to right; 45 degree corner braces at the top and bottom of the end side panels

- 1 1/2 doors (6.5' and 4.5' width); staggered; wood doors with a horizontal brace approx! imately mid-height

- composite ends with braces in a 'V' configuration

- Hutchins Dry lading roof

- straight center sill underframe

- K-style brakes with brake wheel mounted on a vertical shaft.

Overall, the car looks very much like a 50' version of the of the MILW 40' auto boxes (592025-593024) shown on pg. 99 of the Steam Era Freight Cars Reference Manual, Vol. 1.


I'd appreciate any suggestions on a reasonable prototype for this car along with any pointers to photos and/or decal sources. The obvious first question is whether or not the MILW had 50' auto boxes of this style. Thanks in advance for any help.


Rich Gibson

Tulsa, OK



Re: Kadee roofwalks

Chad Boas
 

I have used short pieces of Evergreen 3/32 tube and press fit them onto the tab. I don't glue them so there wont be any bleed thru.

Chad Boas


Re: New Broadway Limited UP 4-12-2

Anspach Denny <danspachmd@...>
 

I do not have a dog in this particular hunt re: Gresley valve gear motion.  However, In his recent pretty definitive book on the SP’s five coupled steam locomotives, Bob Church has elegantly laid out his findings on 3-cylinder valve gearing, citing a host of both primary and secondary sources, not excluding personal interviews with those who worked on such steam motive power. I personally know of any other sources of such credibility on this subject.  In this regard, I feel that those that would -with standing- like to challenge Bob’s views and findings in this matter had better have their own data and sources at the ready. 

IMHO, this same book (Signature Press) is one of the most important books published in long time on steam locomotives, and steam locomotive development culture during the standard era. The value lies in the book  being so much more than just the narrow focus  on several fairly uncommon classes of locomotives of a single railroad; In the telling the stories, and the overview, Bob really covers in fascinating detail how railroad management made motive power decisions; how the needs and abilities of maintenance facilities tilted their sails to accommodate these new locomotives, or in turn, how the new locomotives had to be altered to meet the requirements of existing facilities; and just how changing requirements, technology, and traffic, and assignments over a lifetime caused a railroad to significantly alter or modify a locomotive so that we learn how photos of “as delivered” may have little in common with photos “in use”, etc. 

The value is that the reader in his mind can just substitute any other class of locomotive from railroads A, B, or C to get a good picture about how things probably really would have been on any other railroad besides the SP.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento





Re: Borden's Produce Company reefer

ROGER HINMAN
 

Glad we got to an answer.   Do you have a time frame when these cars were on the roster???




On Jan 17, 2015, at 3:00 AM, jack.f.mullen@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Roger, Thanks.


 If the car number definitely begins 844, that confirms that it's one of the North Western Refrigerator Line cars in the BPDX 84370 - 84478 series.

 You may be right about the end mark being an overpaint.  I can't find an example at hand, but I recall seeing at least one photo of an NWX billboard reefer which appeared to have newly painted sides and noticeably weathered ends. Evidently the car had just received a repaint of the billboard sides only.  However, most of the official photos of newly repainted billboard cars seem to show a full repaint. I doubt we can know whether that was really done for most, or just for the one being photographed.

Jack Mullen



Re: Common MILW trucks

brianleppert@att.net
 

Tahoe Model Works' newest truck, the TMW-115/215 "40-Ton ARA truck", is a very close match.  If anyone would like a flyer for this truck please contact me OFF-LIST at

brianleppert@... (brianleppert at att dot net)

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV 


Re: Common MILW trucks

Tim O'Connor
 

I don't have the book, but I thought that the Tahoe 013 Barber S-2 with
spring plank was the best choice for Milwaukee rib side cars. The Milwaukee
sure seemed to prefer Barber design sideframes over any other. I can't find
a scan of a Milwaukee 40 foot box car with an ASF sideframe. (Having said that
I'm sure someone else will.)

Tim O'Connor

On pages 21 and 22 of the latest book from Speedwitch, "Freight Cars in Context" there are photos of MILW boxcars. I am an idiot when it comes to recognizing trucks. Can someone tell me please what trucks these cars ride on and is there a HO product available?

Bill Welch


Common MILW trucks

Bill Welch
 

On pages 21 and 22 of the latest book from Speedwitch, "Freight Cars in Context" there are photos of MILW boxcars. I am an idiot when it comes to recognizing trucks. Can someone tell me please what trucks these cars ride on and is there a HO product available?


Bill Welch


Re: Car Weights

Edward
 

Using lead is not a problem nor an extreme health hazard provided one is reasonable in using it.

 When working with lead (and other potentially harmful hobby and craft materials) in any form, its important to always wash one's hands clean afterward!   It's as simple as that.

Ed Bommer


Re: New Broadway Limited UP 4-12-2

Clark Propst
 

I hate to add common sense logic here, but this 12 driver thing will require a lot of square footage to operate realistically. Freight cars can be like other static models and be just fun to build, thus having ‘play value’ to recoup some of the cost. But, a locomotive’s only use is to move freight cars around. If you don’t have a layout, what good are they? I understand the archaic brass collecting game. But, I don’t see how you can recoup any value from collecting these newer production locos. Might as well buy resin kits to hide in a closet  ;  ))
Clark BUILD’em and RUN’em Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Kadee roofwalks

paul.doggett2472 <paul.doggett2472@...>
 

Cheers 
           
              Chuck i have canopy cement will give it a go.

Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile

"RUTLANDRS@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Paul,
 
    In the past, barge cement and canopy glue have been suggested.
 
Chuck Hladik
 

In a message dated 1/18/2015 9:56:09 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

Apart from drilling holes in the car roof has anyone any suggestions for fixing Kadee roof walks to a plastic car roof.
Thanks in advance.
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile


Re: Kadee roofwalks

Charles Hladik
 

Paul,
 
    In the past, barge cement and canopy glue have been suggested.
 
Chuck Hladik
 

In a message dated 1/18/2015 9:56:09 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

Apart from drilling holes in the car roof has anyone any suggestions for fixing Kadee roof walks to a plastic car roof.
Thanks in advance.
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile


Kadee roofwalks

paul.doggett2472 <paul.doggett2472@...>
 

Apart from drilling holes in the car roof has anyone any suggestions for fixing Kadee roof walks to a plastic car roof.
Thanks in advance.
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile


SS 50' box - looking for prototype

Rich Gibson
 

All,


I have an HO model that I assembled from a wood kit a number of years ago but never lettered because the decals disintegrated. Looking at it now, it's a nice car but it is clear from the 1955 ORER that the lettering diagrams provided with the kit do not correspond to prototype examples of this car. The kit was manufactured by Quality Craft Models and distributed by Bev-Bel. Unfortunately, I cannot find a picture of this model online to provide a link to, so I will try to describe the car below:

- External dimensions: length 51', height rails to top of roofwalk 15', width 10'

- Single sheathed with 'z' braces; 2 diagonals left of doors, 3 to right; 45 degree corner braces at the top and bottom of the end side panels

- 1 1/2 doors (6.5' and 4.5' width); staggered; wood doors with a horizontal brace approximately mid-height

- composite ends with braces in a 'V' configuration

- Hutchins Dry lading roof

- straight center sill underframe

- K-style brakes with brake wheel mounted on a vertical shaft.

Overall, the car looks very much like a 50' version of the of the MILW 40' auto boxes (592025-593024) shown on pg. 99 of the Steam Era Freight Cars Reference Manual, Vol. 1.


I'd appreciate any suggestions on a reasonable prototype for this car along with any pointers to photos and/or decal sources. The obvious first question is whether or not the MILW had 50' auto boxes of this style. Thanks in advance for any help.


Rich Gibson

Tulsa, OK

53121 - 53140 of 184234