Date   

Re: interesting gondola load

O Fenton Wells
 

Guilty, I didn't zoom!  My bad
Fenton

On Tue, Jan 20, 2015 at 9:29 AM, 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Fenton,


I’m not sure why untreated ties would be individually wrapped in cardboard.   ;)  

dIf you zoom in on the figure, the items appear to be about the size of ties, but seem to have cardboard wrapping held on with multiple metal straps, wood end plugs and appear to contain square tubing (perhaps galvanized metal?).  There appears to have been scrap wood blocking beneath the load, but not between the pieces and it appears that it only just filled the gondola.


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jan 20, 2015, at 8:20 AM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



Looks like untreated ties,
Fenton Wells

On Mon, Jan 19, 2015 at 11:46 AM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 


Anys idea what this gondola load might have been?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/371236096724

That B&O gondola 352409 is nearly brand new in this 1958 photo.

Tim O'Connor




-- 
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...






--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: interesting gondola load

Tim O'Connor
 


I'm convinced they are metal shapes of some kind. The boxes all appear to
be 8 feet or slightly longer -- This corresponds quite well with interior
non-load bearing walls such as used in modern office buildings. I've seen
them put up offices in buildings were I work and it's all metal posts and
beams. They would be wrapped to keep them clean but they're not particularly
vulnerable to moisture or temperature so shipping in a gondola seems ok. I
suppose they could also be duct work pipes.

Tim O'


If you zoom in on the figure, the items appear to be about the size of ties, but seem to have cardboard wrapping held on with multiple metal straps, wood end plugs and appear to contain square tubing (perhaps galvanized metal?).  There appears to have been scrap wood blocking beneath the load, but not between the pieces and it appears that it only just filled the gondola.

Bruce F. Smith           

Anys idea what this gondola load might have been?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/371236096724

That B&O gondola 352409 is nearly brand new in this 1958 photo.

Tim O'Connor


Re: interesting gondola load

Bruce Smith
 

Fenton,

I’m not sure why untreated ties would be individually wrapped in cardboard.   ;)  

dIf you zoom in on the figure, the items appear to be about the size of ties, but seem to have cardboard wrapping held on with multiple metal straps, wood end plugs and appear to contain square tubing (perhaps galvanized metal?).  There appears to have been scrap wood blocking beneath the load, but not between the pieces and it appears that it only just filled the gondola.


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jan 20, 2015, at 8:20 AM, O Fenton Wells srrfan1401@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



Looks like untreated ties,
Fenton Wells

On Mon, Jan 19, 2015 at 11:46 AM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 


Anys idea what this gondola load might have been?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/371236096724

That B&O gondola 352409 is nearly brand new in this 1958 photo.

Tim O'Connor




-- 
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...




Re: interesting gondola load

Benjamin Hom
 

Fenton Wells wrote:


"Looks like untreated ties."
http://www.ebay.com/itm/371236096724

Look again, Fenton. Why would untreated ties be wrapped and banded?


Ben Hom


Re: interesting gondola load

O Fenton Wells
 

Looks like untreated ties,
Fenton Wells

On Mon, Jan 19, 2015 at 11:46 AM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 


Anys idea what this gondola load might have been?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/371236096724

That B&O gondola 352409 is nearly brand new in this 1958 photo.

Tim O'Connor




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...


Re: History of Bev-Bel

 

I have 4 Bev-Bel decorated Robins Rails kits.

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Date: Tuesday, January 20, 2015 at 3:31 AM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] History of Bev-Bel








Dave, good summary. :-)

Bev-Bel also decorated Walthers, Train-Miniature and Model Die Casting cars,
and offered custom decorated locomotives and passenger cars as well. I
always
thought they were loosely connected to Bill Glass (Robin's Rails) too, but
perhaps not. At one time (1970's to 1990's) there were quite a few different
vendors offering custom painted cars. I think the only ones left (like 5th
Ave)
are using Accurail kits.

Tim O'Connor



Bev-Bel was a hobby distributor in Cresskill, N.J. that was best known for its
custom decorating of Athearn and other rolling stock. They did a really nice
job.

Beverly Belkin and her husband Irv were the owners. Bev's name provided the
Bev-Bel.

I met them back in the 1990s and the business was being phased out as Bev and
the others were way past retirement age.

I believe Athearn's sale and decision to stop producing blue box kits, leaving
them nothing to decorate, helped bring about the end as well.

This is from the Walther's website:

Bev-Bel Corp., located in Cresskill, New Jersey, was founded in 1956 by Irvin
& Beverly Belkin. Bev-Bel produces limited runs of roadnames and schemes not
generally produced by major manufacturers, along with special-appeal rolling
stock such as Christmas, 4th of July, Americana and Mexicana Models® series.
Each run has its own distinct cab and car numbers.

Dave Owens
West Hartford, Conn.







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: History of Bev-Bel

 

The also produced a variety of wood and metal craftsman kitsŠ..

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

From: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Date: Monday, January 19, 2015 at 6:48 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] History of Bev-Bel







Bev-Bel was a hobby distributor in Cresskill, N.J. that was best known for
its custom decorating of Athearn and other rolling stock. They did a really
nice job.

Beverly Belkin and her husband Irv were the owners. Bev's name provided the
Bev-Bel.

I met them back in the 1990s and the business was being phased out as Bev
and the others were way past retirement age.

I believe Athearn's sale and decision to stop producing blue box kits,
leaving them nothing to decorate, helped bring about the end as well.

This is from the Walther's website:

Bev-Bel Corp., located in Cresskill, New Jersey, was founded in 1956 by
Irvin & Beverly Belkin. Bev-Bel produces limited runs of roadnames and
schemes not generally produced by major manufacturers, along with
special-appeal rolling stock such as Christmas, 4th of July, Americana and
Mexicana Models® series. Each run has its own distinct cab and car numbers.

Dave Owens
West Hartford, Conn.

On Mon, Jan 19, 2015 at 7:30 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC]
<STMFC@...> wrote:




I have a whole box of Athearn Blue Box 40-ft steel boxcars painted very nicely
by Bev-Bel. Curious about this company as it sounds like they put their name
on some kits. I am wondering if someone could provide a short history of this
company please?



Bill Welch



--
2015 New England/Northeast Prototype Modelers Meet
May 29-30, 2015 (Always the weekend after Memorial Day)
Collinsville, Connecticut
www.neprototypemeet.com <http://www.neprototypemeet.com>
www.facebook.com/NERPM <http://www.facebook.com/NERPM>








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: How late is still considered applicable

Tim O'Connor
 

Mike

I suppose this question arose because of a rather lengthy recent discussion
of 3-cylinder steam locomotives that would seem to be more appropriate on a
list dedicated to such discussions, ahem, like steamloco?

I have seen pictures of steam locomotives ON freight cars as loads. That does
seem more appropriate to me, but I'm not the sheriff, not even a deputy.. Just
a concerned citizen. :-)

Tim O'Connor


Re: History of Bev-Bel

Tim O'Connor
 


Dave, good summary. :-)

Bev-Bel also decorated Walthers, Train-Miniature and Model Die Casting cars,
and offered custom decorated locomotives and passenger cars as well. I always
thought they were loosely connected to Bill Glass (Robin's Rails) too, but
perhaps not. At one time (1970's to 1990's) there were quite a few different
vendors offering custom painted cars. I think the only ones left (like 5th Ave)
are using Accurail kits.

Tim O'Connor



Bev-Bel was a hobby distributor in Cresskill, N.J. that was best known for its custom decorating of Athearn and other rolling stock. They did a really nice job.

Beverly Belkin and her husband Irv were the owners. Bev's name provided the Bev-Bel.

I met them back in the 1990s and the business was being phased out as Bev and the others were way past retirement age.

I believe Athearn's sale and decision to stop producing blue box kits, leaving them nothing to decorate, helped bring about the end as well.

This is from the Walther's website:

Bev-Bel Corp., located in Cresskill, New Jersey, was founded in 1956 by Irvin & Beverly Belkin. Bev-Bel produces limited runs of roadnames and schemes not generally produced by major manufacturers, along with special-appeal rolling stock such as Christmas, 4th of July, Americana and Mexicana Models� series. Each run has its own distinct cab and car numbers.

Dave Owens
West Hartford, Conn.


Re: Car Weights

rob.mclear3@...
 

Agreed but another option is the weights that are used on allow rims as balance weights, the come with their own adhesive, meant to stay on outdoors in all climates and they are zinc coated lead so safe to handle.  Reasonably cheap here as well, $10 gets me enough for about 30 cars.

Rob McLear
Australia.


---In STMFC@..., <asperandeo@...> wrote :

Just to make a couple of observations, sheet lead is not magnetic, and screws make an instant attachment with no solvent vapors or danger of shrinkage. So long – Andy 


Re: UTLX Tank Car Designations

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Dave,

 

I have never been able to figure out a code for the use of Z’s on the end of UTLX tank car.  Class Z cars were, in a 1952 UTLX car listing, were those built to Car Builder’s design, rather than the UTLX designs, such as V, X and X-3. 

 

In photos that I have looked at, some have just Z, another has ZX, yet another says ZX02.  I have a copy of the photo that shows Z20, it is apparently taken at some time before the 1950’s as the car appears to have the split version of the K brake systems.  But cars in this series are still listed as Class Z cars in the 1952 UTLX car listing.  On the other hand, I have a photo of a car built by GAT in 1920 for UTLX’s Products Tank Line (PX.)  In the end view, only the Z is marked on the end.

 

Sorry that I can’t provide anything more definitive.

 

Regards,

Steve Hile

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, January 12, 2015 6:38 PM
To: 'Steve and Barb Hile' shile@... [STMFC]
Subject: [STMFC] UTLX Tank Car Designations

 

 

Steve: 

 

Back in November, you straightened me out on UTLX's use of the "Z" designation for tank cars not of their design (i.e., not X-3s).  I am looking at another LifeLike P2k kit for an AC&F Type 21, this one 8000 gallons.  It has "Z20" stenciled on the end. The build date is 1920.

 

Do you know was the UTLX practice to stencil the Z followed by the build year, or is there another explanation here?

 

Thanks for any advice you can provide.

 

Dave Parker

Riverside, CA


Re: Athearn container gondolas

caboose9792@aol.com <caboose9792@...>
 

I guess you havent been readint the thread ben. If you were you would know that we have been dicussing ALL the lcl contaners including the coke and lcl. if you want a flame war please take it to another group.

mark rickert
Sent with Verizon Mobile Email

---Original Message---
From: STMFC@...
Sent: 1/19/2015 1:05 pm
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Athearn container gondolas

Mark Rickert wrote:"I don't think anyone mentioned the RP Cyc #10 on the NYC cars and the the[i]r containers."Because in this case it doesn't answer the mail. The cars covered are containers for handling LCL carried on cars specifically built for them, NOT the cement containers and converted gons in question. Read the article next time before referencing it.Ben Hom


Re: [Shake_N_Take] RE: drop rung ladders - a better way?

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks for the added insights Schuyler.  You described some of my own fun.  Yes, stiles, not styles. 
 
Thought I’d comment on the “maybe these could be printed parts” thought.  I have printed full ladders in HO scale.   They were gorgeous – Canadian style with .008” diameter rungs and built in steps at the bottom that looked thin .  In fact, the rungs and steps were so thin that Shapeways refused to print them a second time.  So I went to another vendor and printed more.  Trouble is, I have found the frosted ultra detail material is so brittle, the ladders won’t take any normal handling.   I think pie plate is far more stable.
 
Better yet, maybe some of Pierre’s etched metal ladders could be trimmed short and made to work?  Hmm, where is my stash . . . .
 
Rob Kirkham     
 
 
 

Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 8:50 AM
Subject: [Shake_N_Take] RE: [STMFC] drop rung ladders - a better way?
 


Greg says I have a better way . . .

 

Well, he had to put up with my whining while I did them, so at least he’s heard me about this challenge.  By the way, the side parts of ladders are stiles, not styles.

 

For the cars side ladders, I drew a line down the side at the “right location” for the left side of the ladder.  Then, after calculating the distance between the rungs (several times until I got the same answer . . . 8^/ ) I also used a divider to mark off the locations.  The dividers I used have a VERY sharp point on one side, and I made a tiny dimple at that point.  Then I used a straight pin to make that a bit deeper, then the No. 80 drill.  I did the Greg Martin trick of cutting off (in my case) the right hand leg of the rung by putting it through a hole in a piece of .030” styrene, and then pressing the styrene down so the legs were extended as far through the styrene as possible ( for uniformity).  Flush cut nippers did the trick.

 

After putting the grabs in, I used thick ACC on the inside of the car.  NEXT time, I will do something more: I’ll bend the grabs inside the car, and use 5 minute epoxy inside so as to gain a mechanical advantage that will increase the likelihood that the grabs will not rotate.  You can guess why I thought about this . . .

 

The ends . . . (sigh) . . . this was not easy.  I had braced the bulkhead inside with some .040” square styrene, so to drill through for even one side was a challenge, but I did, mostly, dill through for them.  A few, I just drilled in far enough to be able to have one leg IN the end, and used ACC to glue it in.  I glued the 1x2 styrene strip for the corner stile on, then allowed the rungs to tell me where the stile closer to the centerline should be.  The true pisser was when I managed to break a drill bit in the corner stile, close enough to the surface that there was NFW I could get it out.  That one got it’s right leg drilled in and the left one cut off.

 

All in all, these are just miserable things to have to make, IMHO.  BTW, I managed to run out of commercial drop grabs, so had to make about half the grabs on the model from wire.  Which reminds me I should order some more.

 

The end ladders have me thinking that maybe these could be printed parts, especially after seeing Jack Burgess’ superb clinic at Cocoa.  I should look into this on my other list (of interest to this audience) the 3DSTFC list.  I may be the owner, but I am NOT an expert at it, not at all, but still . . .

 

Schuyler

 

 

From: TGREGMRTN

Subject: Re: [STMFC] drop run ladders - a better way?

 

Rob,

 

I will give you my solution and Craig Zeni has another and Schuyler Larrabee has another.

 

I used a jig to create the holes as they need to be the same on the sides as the ends. For the styles I used a thicker Aluminum foil. This left me with a nice thin style. The real secret is to NOT drill holes for both sides of the drop grabs, dill only one and clip the run shot to match the opposing side. This eliminates the possibility of the grabs from becoming crooked.

 

I am sure there are other solutions and Schuyler did use styrene.

 

 

Greg Martin

 

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean

 

In a message dated 1/18/2015 4:43:59 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:

 

I’m slowly working through the 2014 Shake and Take project and have come up against the end ladders.   I’m looking for suggestions others have tried to improve the looks of the finished product.  Mine come out looking like the years have service included a couple of collisions.

 

The approach I’ve tried is to mark the ladder styles on a sheet of .015” thick styrene, including both vertical and horizontal centre lines for each hole to be drilled.  Then use a pin to create a dimple at each +, and drill through with an #80 bit.  I find it hard to create a dimple in the material at the exact correct spot,  so my drilled holes are imperfect.  The pin is thick enough and creates enough shadow that it looks like it is on the +, but it is imprecise.

 

Is there a better idea?  Maybe a jig that is practical?

 

Rob Kirkham

 

 

 

 


Re: How late is still considered applicable

Mikebrock
 

Tim Mulina writes:

"That was one timeframe I was thinking but this is freight cars not just motive power right?"

Actually, it is freight cars including discussion of stuff the cars pulled and including the locomotives that pulled them...given that those discussions are dependent on freight cars as the primary driver..

"I have pics of derailments in the late 1960’s-early 1970’s that have late 1930’s era 40’ NYC PS boxcars."

Well, this might get a bit tricky which is why Jeff Aley and I get paid so much to manage the group...$0 + $0 = $0.

"For that matter there were recent pics online showing a steam loco from the Strasberg RR pulling modern freight cars in the past 3-4 months."

I assume you mean that there was an address to a location where this was shown. The STMFC does not allow photos in attachments. Further, uploaded photos have to be approved by STMFC mgt [ uh...Jeff and I ].

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: How late is still considered applicable

Tim Mulina BHI <bhipubs@...>
 

Jeff,

 

Somewhat yes. I will send you a note offlist.

 

Tim

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 7:05 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] How late is still considered applicable

 

 

Tim,

 

               As others have noted, the cutoff date is 1960.  But I think your question is more detailed than that.  Obviously, anything rolling on the rails prior to 1960 is fine.  We’re also tolerant of post-1960 photos and info that illustrate a car from the pre-1960 era.  However, post-1960 paint schemes or car modifications are not discussed here.

 

               Does that help?

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff Aley

Deputy Moderator, STMFC

 

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 4:13 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] How late is still considered applicable

 

 

In seeing some of the discussions on the list it got me thinking.

 

What are the dates that is the final cut off for freight cars for this list? When they are finally retired per ICC rules or when?

 

Tim


Re: How late is still considered applicable

Tim Mulina BHI <bhipubs@...>
 

Bill,

 

That was one timeframe I was thinking but this is freight cars not just motive power right? I have pics of derailments in the late 1960’s-early 1970’s that have late 1930’s era 40’ NYC PS boxcars.

 

For that matter there were recent pics online showing a steam loco from the Strasberg RR pulling modern freight cars in the past 3-4 months.

 

Tim

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 6:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: How late is still considered applicable

 

 

1960, I assume because that was the year the N&W went from Steam to Diesel this ending the mainline steam.

 

Bill Welch


Re: How late is still considered applicable

Aley, Jeff A
 

Tim,

 

               As others have noted, the cutoff date is 1960.  But I think your question is more detailed than that.  Obviously, anything rolling on the rails prior to 1960 is fine.  We’re also tolerant of post-1960 photos and info that illustrate a car from the pre-1960 era.  However, post-1960 paint schemes or car modifications are not discussed here.

 

               Does that help?

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff Aley

Deputy Moderator, STMFC

 

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, January 19, 2015 4:13 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] How late is still considered applicable

 

 

In seeing some of the discussions on the list it got me thinking.

 

What are the dates that is the final cut off for freight cars for this list? When they are finally retired per ICC rules or when?

 

Tim


Re: How late is still considered applicable

Mikebrock
 


 Tim Mulina [ I think ] writes:
 

"What are the dates that is the final cut off for freight cars for this list? When they are finally retired per ICC rules or when?"

The "window" for discussion about any freight car is from 1900-1960 inclusive regardless of when constructed or retired. Also...standard gauge.

Bill Welch adds:

"1960, I assume because that was the year the N&W went from Steam to Diesel this ending the mainline steam."

Pretty much correct...although, of course, UP's 844 was never retired.

Mike Brock

 

Mike Brock

STMFC Owner

 
 
 
 


Re: History of Bev-Bel

Dave Owens
 

Bev-Bel was a hobby distributor in Cresskill, N.J. that was best known for its custom decorating of Athearn and other rolling stock. They did a really nice job.

Beverly Belkin and her husband Irv were the owners. Bev's name provided the Bev-Bel.

I met them back in the 1990s and the business was being phased out as Bev and the others were way past retirement age.

I believe Athearn's sale and decision to stop producing blue box kits, leaving them nothing to decorate, helped bring about the end as well.

This is from the Walther's website:

Bev-Bel Corp., located in Cresskill, New Jersey, was founded in 1956 by Irvin & Beverly Belkin. Bev-Bel produces limited runs of roadnames and schemes not generally produced by major manufacturers, along with special-appeal rolling stock such as Christmas, 4th of July, Americana and Mexicana Models® series. Each run has its own distinct cab and car numbers.

Dave Owens
West Hartford, Conn.

On Mon, Jan 19, 2015 at 7:30 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


I have a whole box of Athearn Blue Box 40-ft steel boxcars painted very nicely by Bev-Bel. Curious about this company as it sounds like they put their name on some kits. I am wondering if someone could provide a short history of this company please?


Bill Welch






--
2015 New England/Northeast Prototype Modelers Meet
May 29-30, 2015 (Always the weekend after Memorial Day)
Collinsville, Connecticut
www.neprototypemeet.com
www.facebook.com/NERPM


Re: How late is still considered applicable

Bill Welch
 

1960, I assume because that was the year the N&W went from Steam to Diesel this ending the mainline steam.

Bill Welch

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