Date   

interesting 1952 photo

Tim O'Connor
 

Here's a recent upload with lots going on -- (1) Mexico (2) a PRR X29 evidently in
a Mexican passenger train (3) a really cool D&RGW 50 foot double sheathed auto box car
and (4) an ex-SP mogul now owned by Ferrocarril del Pacifico!

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/16222828791/in/photostream/

Tim O'


Re: X29 articles

Benjamin Hom
 

George Walls asked:
"Where do I find the TKM articles you're referring to?"

The articles are available on the first two TKM CD volumes available from the PRRT&HS Company Store. Go to http://www.prrths.com/and click on "TKM" for ordering information. For the specific issues of TKM and Mainline Modeler, see my post from 16 January, 11:47 AM for more details.


Ben Hom


speaking of Merchandise Service X29's

Tim O'Connor
 

any idea of the date and/or location? a neat little scene.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15604835363/

Tim O'Connor


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: One Last X29 Question (I promise. Well, maybe...) (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Amen, Ben! Sometimes I think no one read any of those articles we wrote.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2015 1:11 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [STMFC] One Last X29 Question (I promise. Well, maybe...)



Arved Grass asked:
"Is the Walthers X29 closer to the 1924 or 1928 build?"

The 1924-1925 build.

"In the absence of Red Caboose RC-7000 models (of the 1928 car), I'm looking for an easier way to model a 1928 version car than to kitbash the 1924 ends onto the 1932/1934 body (same 1928 sides, but with Dreadnaught ends)."

You're better off keeping an eye out for the Red Caboose 1928 models with flat ends instead of cutting up Dreadnaught end cars. Besides, building cars from the 1924-1925 production group will keep you plenty busy.

Please do yourself (and me) a huge favor, get the TKM articles, and READ THEM. I'd like to think that all of the effort we put into them (including giving them away for free at the time) was worth it.

Ben Hom





Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: cooper black italic font on railroad cars

Tim O'Connor
 

I do not recommend Kadee decals, unless you want your white letters
to have that "washed out" look. Kadee makes wonderful models but their
lettering is strictly second-rate IMO. I got some of their decals to
make extra SP PS-2 hoppers, but I'll be using Microscale instead.

Tim O'

Kadee will also do small run decals:

http://www.kadee.com/htmbord/custom.htm

Microscale and Rail Graphics will do larger runs.

Arved Grass


X29 articles

ATSF1226
 

Ben,
Where do I find the TKM articles you're referring too.

Thanks
George Walls


Fw: Fwd: Thursday AM

paul.doggett2472 <paul.doggett2472@...>
 






Sent from Samsung mobile



-------- Original message --------
Subject: Fw: Fwd: Thursday AM
From: Martin Boyask <ed_nmra@...>
To:
CC:


Would be better with a more scenic background and less spectators, but a hugely impressive layout
 
(no particular road or era.)
 
MB
 
 
 
 
This is a cab view of a layout setup last weekend in Raleigh.


Re: Car Weights

Doug Pillow
 

I discovered for a lot of cars half inch nuts make close to ideal weight and very cheap fifty to a box


O&W caboose kit

Clark Propst
 

A friend asked me to ask on this list about an O&W laser wood caboose kit that was commissioned built by Branchline. He would like one if someone has an extra?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: One Last X29 Question (I promise. Well, maybe...)

Benjamin Hom
 

Arved Grass asked:
"Is the Walthers X29 closer to the 1924 or 1928 build?"

The 1924-1925 build.



"In the absence of Red Caboose RC-7000 models (of the 1928 car), I'm looking for an easier way to model a 1928 version car than to kitbash the 1924 ends onto the 1932/1934 body (same 1928 sides, but with Dreadnaught ends)."

You're better off keeping an eye out for the Red Caboose 1928 models with flat ends instead of cutting up Dreadnaught end cars. Besides, building cars from the 1924-1925 production group will keep you plenty busy.

Please do yourself (and me) a huge favor, get the TKM articles, and READ THEM. I'd like to think that all of the effort we put into them (including giving them away for free at the time) was worth it.


Ben Hom


One Last X29 Question (I promise. Well, maybe...)

arved_grass
 

Is the Walthers X29 closer to the 1924 or 1928 build? In the absence of Red Caboose RC-7000 models (of the 1928 car), I'm looking for an easier way to model a 1928 version car than to kitbash the 1924 ends onto the 1932/1934 body (same 1928 sides, but with Dreadnaught ends).

Photos of the Walthers cars on-line aren't detailed enough to see the difference. Although all I've seen (were I can read the build date) show a build date prior to 1928, my hope is it's usable, and I won't have to resort to kitbashing the 1928 cars (or avoiding them in my fleet).

Thanks,

Arved Grass
Arved_Grass@yahoo.com or Arved@I-Do-Photography.com
Fleming Island, Florida


Re: Bananas via Fruit Growers Express

Cyril Durrenberger
 

Do you know the years that are covered by these files?

Cyril Durrenberger
--------------------------------------------

On Thu, 1/22/15, george eichelberger geichelberger@bellsouth.net [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [STMFC] Re: Bananas via Fruit Growers Express
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, January 22, 2015, 9:03 AM

Yes, Charleston, SC was an important
banana importing point, particularly for loads going to the
midwest on the Southern through Asheville, Knoxville and
Cincinnati. The SRHA files at Kennesaw contain individual
files for many banana boat arrivals. The facility was
operated by the SR with only a small portion of the loads
going to the SAL and ACL. Outbound loads in express cars on
passenger trains was not common. Messages asking to send
empty refrigerator cars to Charleston to be loaded proceeded
every boat’s arrival. The boat files almost always include
the reporting mark and number of every outbound car,
if/where it was interchanged and its billed destination.
Many cars destined to the midwest were diverted en route at
Knoxville or Cincinnati so we do not know their actual end
points. Single cars would be billed to grocery distributors
in places like Asheville or Greensboro, NC.

Accumulating the cars to load appears to have been a mad
dash to collect any empty refrigerator cars, from any owner,
no matter if they were normally used for meat, fruit or
vegetable service. Empty cars to Charleston received the
highest priority with extra trains for them not unusual. Out
bound consists have a much higher proportion of non-Fruit
Growers cars than the peach or Fla citrus trains also
operated by the Southern. (Was this because the pier and
Charleston banana traffic was managed by the railroad?) A
typical outbound banana train was operated as an extra
movement, behind a 2-8-2, with 50-55 cars.

The files always include the names of the arriving ships.
Obviously, the same ships reappear at Charleston but until
someone does the research, we cannot say if there was a
pattern to their movements. Most (all?) were owned by the
United Fruit Co.

------------------------------------

------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links


    STMFC-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com


Re: cooper black italic font on railroad cars

arved_grass
 

Kadee will also do small run decals:

http://www.kadee.com/htmbord/custom.htm

Microscale and Rail Graphics will do larger runs.

Arved Grass
Arved_Grass@yahoo.com or Arved@I-Do-Photography.com
Fleming Island, Florida

--------------------------------------------

On Thu, 1/22/15, 'North Model Railroad Supplies' nmrs@optusnet.com.au [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [STMFC] Re: cooper black italic font on railroad cars
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, January 22, 2015, 4:23 AM


 









Hi Ben,I’m not aware of any
railroad using Cooper Black Italicized.But as Cooper Black is a
standard font in Word, and like all the Word fonts can be
italicized, why not make your own, or have someone do some
decals for you (depending on colour)?If you want black, Micro mark
sell paper that will allow you to print from your inkjet
printer.If you want
white or other colours, join the Yahoo Alpsdecal Group and
ask if anyone will make the decals for you.Alternatively, I have a mate
with a Roland printer who will do the same job.If you email my off group,
I’ll give you his email address.CheersDave North    









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Re: Bananas via Fruit Growers Express

George Eichelberger
 

Yes, Charleston, SC was an important banana importing point, particularly for loads going to the midwest on the Southern through Asheville, Knoxville and Cincinnati. The SRHA files at Kennesaw contain individual files for many banana boat arrivals. The facility was operated by the SR with only a small portion of the loads going to the SAL and ACL. Outbound loads in express cars on passenger trains was not common. Messages asking to send empty refrigerator cars to Charleston to be loaded proceeded every boat’s arrival. The boat files almost always include the reporting mark and number of every outbound car, if/where it was interchanged and its billed destination. Many cars destined to the midwest were diverted en route at Knoxville or Cincinnati so we do not know their actual end points. Single cars would be billed to grocery distributors in places like Asheville or Greensboro, NC.

Accumulating the cars to load appears to have been a mad dash to collect any empty refrigerator cars, from any owner, no matter if they were normally used for meat, fruit or vegetable service. Empty cars to Charleston received the highest priority with extra trains for them not unusual. Out bound consists have a much higher proportion of non-Fruit Growers cars than the peach or Fla citrus trains also operated by the Southern. (Was this because the pier and Charleston banana traffic was managed by the railroad?) A typical outbound banana train was operated as an extra movement, behind a 2-8-2, with 50-55 cars.

The files always include the names of the arriving ships. Obviously, the same ships reappear at Charleston but until someone does the research, we cannot say if there was a pattern to their movements. Most (all?) were owned by the United Fruit Co.


Re: cooper black italic font on railroad cars

tyesac@...
 

Ben,
 
The non italicized Cooper Black was found on some Santa Fe freight cars painted in the 70's & 80's.  It was first used on road deisels starting in 1959, so it's out of scope for this group for freight cars.  Typically, Santa Fe used Cooper Black in white for some box cars painted in mineral red, black or light blue (less common) for some airslide covered hoppers.  Being trackside in the 70's & 80's I can't recall seing anybody else using the Cooper Black, and not in italic.  As much as I hate to state in terms of "always or never", maybe some photo will then be pulled out of the shadows to prove me wrong about that.
 
Tom Ccasey


-----Original Message-----
From: 'North Model Railroad Supplies' nmrs@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Jan 22, 2015 3:56 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: cooper black italic font on railroad cars

 
Hi Ben,
I’m not aware of any railroad using Cooper Black Italicized.
But as Cooper Black is a standard font in Word, and like all the Word fonts can be italicized, why not make your own, or have someone do some decals for you (depending on colour)?
If you want black, Micro mark sell paper that will allow you to print from your inkjet printer.
If you want white or other colours, join the Yahoo Alpsdecal Group and ask if anyone will make the decals for you.
Alternatively, I have a mate with a Roland printer who will do the same job.
If you email my off group, I’ll give you his email address.
Cheers
Dave North
 
 


Re: cooper black italic font on railroad cars

North Model Railroad Supplies <nmrs@...>
 

Hi Ben,

I’m not aware of any railroad using Cooper Black Italicized.

But as Cooper Black is a standard font in Word, and like all the Word fonts can be italicized, why not make your own, or have someone do some decals for you (depending on colour)?

If you want black, Micro mark sell paper that will allow you to print from your inkjet printer.

If you want white or other colours, join the Yahoo Alpsdecal Group and ask if anyone will make the decals for you.

Alternatively, I have a mate with a Roland printer who will do the same job.

If you email my off group, I’ll give you his email address.

Cheers

Dave North

 

 


Re: cooper black italic font on railroad cars

Benjamin Scanlon
 

My hope is that a few such typists and fontists reside here. 


Cooper black italic typeface looks like a post-1960 thing, but it was created in the early 1920s, and was according to Wiki, hugely popular in Chicago and the Midwest in the 1920s, not sure if that popularity made it to any railroad ... but if there was any decal that used it, it would  be handy to know.


Ben Scanlon

London


Re: cooper black italic font on railroad cars

Tony Thompson
 

Brother William Bryk wrote:

 
It is a somewhat cheeky answer.  Moreover, I don't have the correct one.  But I think overlooking the issue of font v. stencil and simply addressing whether any railroad used lettering in the style of Cooper black italic on their rolling stock would have been more helpful and, perhaps, even fraternal, as this hobby is something of a brotherhood.

   Say, brother, the type geeks and font snobs are a brotherhood too.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: cooper black italic font on railroad cars

William Bryk <wmbryk@...>
 

It is a somewhat cheeky answer.  Moreover, I don't have the correct one.  But I think overlooking the issue of font v. stencil and simply addressing whether any railroad used lettering in the style of Cooper black italic on their rolling stock would have been more helpful and, perhaps, even fraternal, as this hobby is something of a brotherhood.

Regards,
William Bryk

On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 11:59 PM, 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Ben,

The simple, somewhat cheeky answer is that no, no railroads used Cooper Black italic font on their rolling stock... because as we have noted a number of time, rolling stock was not lettered with "fonts" but rather with stencils.  Fonts are the province of typesetters and the like.

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2015 7:48 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] cooper black italic font on railroad cars



Hi


Kind of an odd question, but I am wondering if any railroad used Cooper black italic font on their rolling stock.  Sounds obscure but 'Cooper black' was what the ATSF used on their diesels, but the italic version seems to be somewhat rarer, and I'm trying to find a decal or transfer with lettering in that font. 


Regards,


Ben Scanlon

London, UK






--
William Bryk
Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law
578 74th Street
Brooklyn, New York 11209-2614
Tel/Fax: (347) 497-5972


Re: cooper black italic font on railroad cars

Bruce Smith
 

Ben,

The simple, somewhat cheeky answer is that no, no railroads used Cooper Black italic font on their rolling stock... because as we have noted a number of time, rolling stock was not lettered with "fonts" but rather with stencils.  Fonts are the province of typesetters and the like.

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2015 7:48 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] cooper black italic font on railroad cars



Hi


Kind of an odd question, but I am wondering if any railroad used Cooper black italic font on their rolling stock.  Sounds obscure but 'Cooper black' was what the ATSF used on their diesels, but the italic version seems to be somewhat rarer, and I'm trying to find a decal or transfer with lettering in that font. 


Regards,


Ben Scanlon

London, UK



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