Date   

Re: e bay chuckle

Bruce Smith
 

The Q1 2015 edition of the NYC Modeler has an article by Seth Larkin on building some AMB kits and he converted one to a plywood sided car with Squadron white putty to fill in the grooves.  It seemed to work fairly nicely.  I suppose that you could also contact AMB to see if they would cut plywood sides for you...

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 10:35 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Andy the sides in the AMB kit may not be reversible, depending upon window placement, etc. It they are exact duplicates you could swap the two sides and have the smooth side out. But more they are not exact duplicates, in which case you would be better off using the sides as patterns to cut smooth sides out of styrene. Then you have the task of attaching styrene to wood.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org




Re: e bay chuckle

Douglas Harding
 

Andy the sides in the AMB kit may not be reversible, depending upon window placement, etc. It they are exact duplicates you could swap the two sides and have the smooth side out. But more they are not exact duplicates, in which case you would be better off using the sides as patterns to cut smooth sides out of styrene. Then you have the task of attaching styrene to wood.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: e bay chuckle

Andy Harman
 

I just remembered... I have an AMB Laserkit of an N&W CF caboose.  This is one I have attempted three times to build from a QC kit- twice in HO scale and once in O scale.  All failed.

Thing is, I will be modeling a CF as rebuilt with plywood sides.  Not sure if I can reverse the sides so the smooth side is out, or just make them from styrene.

I also have a brass CF... NJI I think, never painted it.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 29, 2015, at 6:04 PM, "Jeff Pellas jppellas@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

All I can say is, even though they're interesting, you do have to be choosy when tackling one of those old wood kits --- and be ready to improvise. That's why I'm a member of this forum. I need the prototype knowledge to be able to discern which of those kits is worth trying and which to pass over. I determine this by how accurate a model I can get given the limitations of the kit.  
      I've put a lot of work, recently, into a kit that dates from the late 1930s by a company called Comet. The prototype is a Wabash 40' SS, double door auto car with 3-3-3 Dreadnaught ends. The original kit consisted of a wood body, a single piece of wood for the underframe, I single turned piece if wood for the K brake cylinder/reservoir, a wooden peaked roof, stamped copper roof ribs, and several very thin flat pieces of wood that I was required to cut into various lengths to make the roof walk details. The sides and ends were of embossed card stock. Ladder was brass ladder stock and brake wheel was, I think, cast metal.
     There were some structural accuracy problems and many detail deficiencies with this kit --on top of it being very primitive-- but the one thing about it that made me decide to build it was that I was able to determine that the embossed sides were accurately lettered and numbered. I've made massive changes to the kit and I'm about 90% finished with it now but I'm satisfied enough with how this has turned out that I'm going to build another Comet kit of a similar car by Grand Trunk Western. 



-----Original Message-----
From: ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 2:57 pm
Subject: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic kits of similar cars.

The screen roof walks look just like screens (not like roof walks) and are always bent.

Getting rid of the wood grain is always troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 

How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows on that end look like windows in an armored car.

Ed Mines



Re: e bay chuckle

Andy Harman
 

In the 1970s Quality Craft made a PRR 50' auto box car with end doors.  A local guy built one up and had it on display at the LHS.  It did the job, I bought the kit and some scalecoat sanding sealer.  I really gave it the old college try, but I was never satisfied with the prepping of the wood.  It had cast ends so I did'nt have to worry about that.

I never got any farther with it... Today I would use the cast parts and build the rest with styrene shapes.  How do you surface sand a piece of spaghetti wood?  My answer is... I don't.  Fortunately I didn't mangle the kit to where I Couldn't sell it.  

Also attempted a QC well flat car that had cast end beams and you had to shape the sides around them... And to represent a welded stiffener they gave you a piece of cardstock.  I got farther with that one but eventually parked and ebayed it 25 years later.

Wood is like shooting film when you've got a nice digital camera.  Except I will still shoot film for fun.  I will work with wood if it's for furniture, benchwork, or other 1:1 utility.  But for models plastic is king.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 29, 2015, at 6:04 PM, "Jeff Pellas jppellas@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

All I can say is, even though they're interesting, you do have to be choosy when tackling one of those old wood kits --- and be ready to improvise. That's why I'm a member of this forum. I need the prototype knowledge to be able to discern which of those kits is worth trying and which to pass over. I determine this by how accurate a model I can get given the limitations of the kit.  
      I've put a lot of work, recently, into a kit that dates from the late 1930s by a company called Comet. The prototype is a Wabash 40' SS, double door auto car with 3-3-3 Dreadnaught ends. The original kit consisted of a wood body, a single piece of wood for the underframe, I single turned piece if wood for the K brake cylinder/reservoir, a wooden peaked roof, stamped copper roof ribs, and several very thin flat pieces of wood that I was required to cut into various lengths to make the roof walk details. The sides and ends were of embossed card stock. Ladder was brass ladder stock and brake wheel was, I think, cast metal.
     There were some structural accuracy problems and many detail deficiencies with this kit --on top of it being very primitive-- but the one thing about it that made me decide to build it was that I was able to determine that the embossed sides were accurately lettered and numbered. I've made massive changes to the kit and I'm about 90% finished with it now but I'm satisfied enough with how this has turned out that I'm going to build another Comet kit of a similar car by Grand Trunk Western. 



-----Original Message-----
From: ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 2:57 pm
Subject: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic kits of similar cars.

The screen roof walks look just like screens (not like roof walks) and are always bent.

Getting rid of the wood grain is always troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 

How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows on that end look like windows in an armored car.

Ed Mines



Re: e bay chuckle

Mikebrock
 

Bill Welch writes:

"I think it would be very interesting to have an Album dedicated to photos of wood models as a part of this Yahoo discussion group."

I have to say that one of the best wood models that I have seen is the Quality Craft UP CA-1 caboose. UP modelers have been blessed with quite a few nice renditions of CA-1 cabooses and the old Quality Craft hangs in pretty well with its various brass competitors.

I have to also say that I have a soft spot [ in my brain? ] for the old Silver Streak DS box car [ USRA?], particularly the Frisco version with Frisco Fast Freight emblazoned on its side...although I believe I determined that such a logo never appeared on the car.

Mike Brock...what hapened? Is it 1953 again?


Re: e bay chuckle

Bill Welch
 

FYI the Wabash DD SS cars had Radial roofs.

I think it would be very interesting to have an Album dedicated to photos of wood models as a part of this Yahoo discussion group.

Bill Welch


Re: e bay chuckle

Jeff Pellas <jppellas@...>
 

All I can say is, even though they're interesting, you do have to be choosy when tackling one of those old wood kits --- and be ready to improvise. That's why I'm a member of this forum. I need the prototype knowledge to be able to discern which of those kits is worth trying and which to pass over. I determine this by how accurate a model I can get given the limitations of the kit.  
      I've put a lot of work, recently, into a kit that dates from the late 1930s by a company called Comet. The prototype is a Wabash 40' SS, double door auto car with 3-3-3 Dreadnaught ends. The original kit consisted of a wood body, a single piece of wood for the underframe, I single turned piece if wood for the K brake cylinder/reservoir, a wooden peaked roof, stamped copper roof ribs, and several very thin flat pieces of wood that I was required to cut into various lengths to make the roof walk details. The sides and ends were of embossed card stock. Ladder was brass ladder stock and brake wheel was, I think, cast metal.
     There were some structural accuracy problems and many detail deficiencies with this kit --on top of it being very primitive-- but the one thing about it that made me decide to build it was that I was able to determine that the embossed sides were accurately lettered and numbered. I've made massive changes to the kit and I'm about 90% finished with it now but I'm satisfied enough with how this has turned out that I'm going to build another Comet kit of a similar car by Grand Trunk Western. 

Jeff
jppellas@...


-----Original Message-----
From: ed_mines@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 2:57 pm
Subject: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic kits of similar cars.

The screen roof walks look just like screens (not like roof walks) and are always bent.

Getting rid of the wood grain is always troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 

How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows on that end look like windows in an armored car.

Ed Mines



Custom Decal Maker

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

Recently we were moaning about how many decal makers had folded their tents for good. Today on page 42 in the Jan/Feb 2015 NG&SLG I saw an add for one I've never heard of: Cedarleaf Custom Decals at scedarleaf@... (yes, the "s" is part of their address). As I have no current need for custom decals, I will let someone else be the first to order from them, if they are indeed a new player. Otherwise, does anybody have any experience with them?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


e bay chuckle

ed_mines
 

Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic kits of similar cars.


The screen roof walks look just like screens (not like roof walks) and are always bent.


Getting rid of the wood grain is always troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 


How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows on that end look like windows in an armored car.


Ed Mines


Re: Ex-Model Die Casting ARA Cast Steel truck w/Spring Plank

Bill Welch
 

Thank you Scott, I found them on the Athearn website.

Bill Welch


Re: Book: Freight Car Distribution & Car Handling In The United States

Scott H. Haycock
 

Another option is to "Bookmark" the site on your browser. This way you can read it without downloading it to your hard drive and taking up space that may have better uses.

Scott Haycock


 

Rupert Gamlen wrote:

 

Unless you are a "member" you can only download single pages. The flip side - when compared with Archive - is that the electronic search facility is very good.


  The book can still be readily found on the Internet from used book sellers for reasonable prices. I personally like the ability to use the physical features of a book for reading and looking up details.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Book: Freight Car Distribution & Car Handling In The United States

Tony Thompson
 

Rupert Gamlen wrote:

 

Unless you are a "member" you can only download single pages. The flip side - when compared with Archive - is that the electronic search facility is very good.


  The book can still be readily found on the Internet from used book sellers for reasonable prices. I personally like the ability to use the physical features of a book for reading and looking up details.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Broadway Limited Imports Stock Car

Brian Termunde
 


1a. Re: Broadway Limited Imports Stock Car
    Posted by: "Douglas Harding" doug.harding@... hardingdouglas
    Date: Wed Jan 28, 2015 4:20 am ((PST))

I live in a rural area, with a very active sale barn in town and numerous
farmers raising cattle and hogs. If desired I could bring a bucket of the
appropriate organic material, enough to fill thousands of stockcars, to
Naperville next fall.

**************************

Thanks for the offer Doug, but I work at a hotel, I get PLENTY of not only 'appropriate' organic material, but also more then enough **inappropriate** organic material!  ; <

Take Care,
 
Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, UT
 
"My Train of Thought left the station without me!"


Re: Book: Freight Car Distribution & Car Handling In The United States

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

Tim

Unless you are a "member" you can only download single pages. The flip side
- when compared with Archive - is that the electronic search facility is
very good.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: 29 January 2015 09:55
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Book: Freight Car Distribution & Car Handling In The
United States


Bob I was not able to download the Google book from the link you provided.
It said I had to belong to a "member institution".

Tim O'Connor


Re: Ex-Model Die Casting ARA Cast Steel truck w/Spring Plank

Scott H. Haycock
 

Bill,

#90394. The Sheet shows this as a Bettendorf truck. It also lists #90390-70Ton, #90384-Timken, and #90392, Allied Full Cusion. Apparently there are different trucks with some of the models, maybe by Roadname?



Scott Haycock


 


I notice that the truck included on the Athearn DD steel cars distributed for the "Shake 'n Take" project at CCB includes the Ex-Model Die Casting ARA Cast Steel truck w/Spring Plank as so classified in Richard Hendrickson's "HO Freight Car Trucks" guide. Since the kit itself is ex-MDC, this makes sense. Richard noted that the truck was not in production but that appears to have changed, or more likely, they are using up stock molded by MDC. Anyway, to my way of thinking it would be good to have a few extra pair of these incase something comes up that they match, BUT oops, I lost the exploded view that might have had the part # for the Truck. Can anyone help me out with a Part Number please?


Bill Welch

 




Ex-Model Die Casting ARA Cast Steel truck w/Spring Plank

Bill Welch
 

I notice that the truck included on the Athearn DD steel cars distributed for the "Shake 'n Take" project at CCB includes the Ex-Model Die Casting ARA Cast Steel truck w/Spring Plank as so classified in Richard Hendrickson's "HO Freight Car Trucks" guide. Since the kit itself is ex-MDC, this makes sense. Richard noted that the truck was not in production but that appears to have changed, or more likely, they are using up stock molded by MDC. Anyway, to my way of thinking it would be good to have a few extra pair of these incase something comes up that they match, BUT oops, I lost the exploded view that might have had the part # for the Truck. Can anyone help me out with a Part Number please?


Bill Welch

 


Re: e bay chuckle

Jeff Pellas <jppellas@...>
 

It is mostly a generational thing but some of us just like 'em. Hard to explain. If I can build a wood kit car that is the proper dimensions, is detailed, weighted, painted and lettered correctly, has the right trucks and is weathered properly, that is actually enough for me. If it doesn't hold up under a magnifying lens, so be it. Not saying I don't have some resin models, because I do, but, at the risk of snickers and guffaws, I love the ol' match stick kits!

--Jeff
   

-----Original Message-----
From: Andy Harman gsgondola@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Wed, Jan 28, 2015 5:34 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] e bay chuckle

At 02:26 PM 1/28/2015 -0800, you wrote:
>Why anyone would pay a premium for wood kits representing steel cars is 
>beyond me, particularly the ACF covered hopper. Remember that screen 
>representing the roof walk? Ugh.

I was never much of a whittler.  Wrong generation I guess.  The only reason 
I'd buy a wood kit - if the price is very reasonable - would be for the 
plans and shapes, so I could duplicate it in styrene... and possibly use 
any metal castings.  The fact that I have not successfully done this yet 
speaks volumes.

Andy



------------------------------------
Posted by: Andy Harman <gsgondola@...>
------------------------------------


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Re: e bay chuckle

Andy Harman
 

At 02:26 PM 1/28/2015 -0800, you wrote:
Why anyone would pay a premium for wood kits representing steel cars is beyond me, particularly the ACF covered hopper. Remember that screen representing the roof walk? Ugh.
I was never much of a whittler. Wrong generation I guess. The only reason I'd buy a wood kit - if the price is very reasonable - would be for the plans and shapes, so I could duplicate it in styrene... and possibly use any metal castings. The fact that I have not successfully done this yet speaks volumes.

Andy


e bay chuckle

ed_mines
 

I regularly buy old kits on e bay; Some of the listings are funny.


There are a lot of expensive Sunshine kits. The seller should realize that the some the cars are available from as easy to build plastc kits like the 52 ft gons from K2K and Tangent.


Why anyone would pay a premium for wood kits representing steel cars is beyond me, particularly the ACF covered hopper. Remember that screen representing the roof walk? Ugh.


My real reason for this post is a recent "unassembled" Ambroid D&H caboose kit. Look at the ends in the picture. Builder must have had a few drinks.


Ed Mines


Re: Book: Freight Car Distribution & Car Handling In The United States

Tim O'Connor
 

Bob I was not able to download the Google book from the link you provided.
It said I had to belong to a "member institution".

Tim O'Connor

Courtesy of Charles Hostetler�s blog (Modeling the CNW in Milwaukee, 1957) here is a link to a very interesting industry text by Eugene W. Coughlin. The author was the Manager, Railroad Relations, Car Service Division, Association Of American Railroads. The book was published in 1956.

61981 - 62000 of 193414