Date   

Re: MTH Paint Remover

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

Would acetone/lacquer thinner/fingernail polish remover be safe? I use this to strip paint from fiberglass (on archery bows), but I'm not sure of its effect on styrene.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 1/30/15 11:39 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:
 


Evidently not, since it's a major component of Accupaint, TruColor etc.
I didn't soak the Front Range bodies for long -- just a few seconds in
the bath and the paint sloughed off. Because it's so volatile it will
evaporate almost immediately from the car when the car is removed from
the bath. I think that if you allow them to soak or leave a puddle on the
car, that could damage the plastic. Also I only stripped the car body,
not fine ladders, etc.


At 1/30/2015 11:30 PM Friday, you wrote:


Won't MEK dissolve the car? I use it as my solvent for plastic kits.
 
__________________________________________________
J. Stephen Sandifer
Minister Emeritus, Southwest Central Church of Christ
Webmaster, Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society
 
From: STMFC@... [ mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, January 30, 2015 10:19 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] MTH Paint Remover
 
 

Chuck

Tried acetone or MEK? I mention this because the old Front Range cars
were extremely hard to strip, except with Accupaint thinner, which is
around 75% acetone + MEK. (Fred Becker is the person who found the paint
in the first place, and told George Bishop who quickly switched his AP
brand to that type of paint. AP was originally a complete different paint.)

Tim O'



At 1/30/2015 10:12 PM Friday, you wrote:
Has anyone found a paint remover successful in removing the paint and lettering from MTH freight cars?  I’ve tried 91% alcohol, Scalecoat Paint Remover and  brake fluid.  Was able to remove the paint and most of the lettering, but not the lettering outline which remained.
 
Chuck Davis
Norfolk VA





Re: MTH Paint Remover

Tim O'Connor
 


Evidently not, since it's a major component of Accupaint, TruColor etc.
I didn't soak the Front Range bodies for long -- just a few seconds in
the bath and the paint sloughed off. Because it's so volatile it will
evaporate almost immediately from the car when the car is removed from
the bath. I think that if you allow them to soak or leave a puddle on the
car, that could damage the plastic. Also I only stripped the car body,
not fine ladders, etc.


At 1/30/2015 11:30 PM Friday, you wrote:


Won't MEK dissolve the car? I use it as my solvent for plastic kits.
 
__________________________________________________
J. Stephen Sandifer
Minister Emeritus, Southwest Central Church of Christ
Webmaster, Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society
 
From: STMFC@... [ mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, January 30, 2015 10:19 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] MTH Paint Remover
 
 

Chuck

Tried acetone or MEK? I mention this because the old Front Range cars
were extremely hard to strip, except with Accupaint thinner, which is
around 75% acetone + MEK. (Fred Becker is the person who found the paint
in the first place, and told George Bishop who quickly switched his AP
brand to that type of paint. AP was originally a complete different paint.)

Tim O'



At 1/30/2015 10:12 PM Friday, you wrote:
Has anyone found a paint remover successful in removing the paint and lettering from MTH freight cars?  I�ve tried 91% alcohol, Scalecoat Paint Remover and  brake fluid.  Was able to remove the paint and most of the lettering, but not the lettering outline which remained.
 
Chuck Davis
Norfolk VA




Re: MTH Paint Remover

Steve SANDIFER
 

Won't MEK dissolve the car? I use it as my solvent for plastic kits.

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

Minister Emeritus, Southwest Central Church of Christ

Webmaster, Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, January 30, 2015 10:19 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] MTH Paint Remover

 

 

Chuck

Tried acetone or MEK? I mention this because the old Front Range cars
were extremely hard to strip, except with Accupaint thinner, which is
around 75% acetone + MEK. (Fred Becker is the person who found the paint
in the first place, and told George Bishop who quickly switched his AP
brand to that type of paint. AP was originally a complete different paint.)

Tim O'



At 1/30/2015 10:12 PM Friday, you wrote:

Has anyone found a paint remover successful in removing the paint and lettering from MTH freight cars?  I’ve tried 91% alcohol, Scalecoat Paint Remover and  brake fluid.  Was able to remove the paint and most of the lettering, but not the lettering outline which remained.
 
Chuck Davis
Norfolk VA


Re: MTH Paint Remover

Tim O'Connor
 

Chuck

Tried acetone or MEK? I mention this because the old Front Range cars
were extremely hard to strip, except with Accupaint thinner, which is
around 75% acetone + MEK. (Fred Becker is the person who found the paint
in the first place, and told George Bishop who quickly switched his AP
brand to that type of paint. AP was originally a complete different paint.)

Tim O'



At 1/30/2015 10:12 PM Friday, you wrote:

Has anyone found a paint remover successful in removing the paint and lettering from MTH freight cars?  I�ve tried 91% alcohol, Scalecoat Paint Remover and  brake fluid.  Was able to remove the paint and most of the lettering, but not the lettering outline which remained.
 
Chuck Davis
Norfolk VA


MTH Paint Remover

Layout Tour
 

Has anyone found a paint remover successful in removing the paint and lettering from MTH freight cars?  I’ve tried 91% alcohol, Scalecoat Paint Remover and  brake fluid.  Was able to remove the paint and most of the lettering, but not the lettering outline which remained.

 

Chuck Davis

Norfolk VA


Re: Custom Decal Maker

Charles Hladik
 

Garth, et al,.
 
    Don Tichy of Tichy Train Group passed the word at Springfield that he will now be doing custom decals, including white.
 
Chuck Hladik
 

In a message dated 1/29/2015 3:30:14 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

Friends,

Recently we were moaning about how many decal makers had folded their
tents for good. Today on page 42 in the Jan/Feb 2015 NG&SLG I saw an add
for one I've never heard of: Cedarleaf Custom Decals at
scedarleaf@... (yes, the "s" is part of their address). As I have no
current need for custom decals, I will let someone else be the first to
order from them, if they are indeed a new player. Otherwise, does
anybody have any experience with them?

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff


New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.


File : /1905 common design hopper.txt
Uploaded by : jaydeet2001 <jaydeet2001@yahoo.com>
Description : A list of hoppers built to the general design of the "1905 Common Design", along with others that may or may not be of that design.


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/1905%20common%20design%20hopper.txt


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398


Regards,


jaydeet2001 <jaydeet2001@yahoo.com>


Re: National Type B Truck Longevity

John Barry
 

Dave,

To the best of my knowledge, Santa Fe did not replace these trucks in any systematic fashion.  There may have been individual cases of different trucks applied as repair replacements, but i am unaware of any fleetwide program to change them out on the cars so equipped.  ATSF was a fan of these and employed them on many of its STMFC classes.
 
John Barry

ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights

707-490-9696

PO Box 44736
Washington, DC 20026-4736


From: "ealabhan0@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, January 30, 2015 4:34 PM
Subject: [STMFC] National Type B Truck Longevity

 
Group,
The National Type B truck, while not as popular as the conventional AAR design, was nevertheless used on a number of freight car orders from Class I railroads and private owners.  I have two Resin Car Works ACF Type 27 acid tank cars on order, including one for Hooker Chemicals.  The Barriger Library's online builder photo of HOKX 219 clearly shows National Type B trucks, as built by ACF 12-39.  The question arose in my mind as to whether this car, and various others (i.e., ATSF Bx-37, SFRD Rr-29 and Rr-30, etc.), would have retained these trucks up through my 1958 modeling era, or if there had been some later prohibition against them as with the Allied Full Cushion trucks?  I found nothing in searching STMFC Files and Conversations.  Anyone know of any regulatory action, or of any reliability, maintenance, and/or cost factor that affected the service life of this distinctive truck, or National's revised Type B-1 version?
Thanks in advance, Dave Sieber, Reno NV





Re: National Type B Truck Longevity

Tim O'Connor
 

Dave

The latest in-service photo scan I have of a National Type B-1 truck
on a freight car is from 1979. I've never seen a photo of one converted
to roller bearings so it makes sense the trucks disappeared from service
during the 1970's. But there were many definitely in service in 1958!

Tim O'

The National Type B truck, while not as popular as the conventional AAR design, was nevertheless used on a number of freight car orders from Class I railroads and private owners. I have two Resin Car Works ACF Type 27 acid tank cars on order, including one for Hooker Chemicals. The Barriger Library's online builder photo of HOKX 219 clearly shows National Type B trucks, as built by ACF 12-39. The question arose in my mind as to whether this car, and various others (i.e., ATSF Bx-37, SFRD Rr-29 and Rr-30, etc.), would have retained these trucks up through my 1958 modeling era, or if there had been some later prohibition against them as with the Allied Full Cushion trucks? I found nothing in searching STMFC Files and Conversations. Anyone know of any regulatory action, or of any reliability, maintenance, and/or cost factor that affected the service life of this distinctive truck, or National's revised Type B-1 version?

Thanks in advance, Dave Sieber, Reno NV


Re: Comet Kits

drgwrail
 

I remember buying a Comet kit sometime around 1940. Interesting thing is that I bought it by mail from Sear-Roebuck. Sears issued a good sized separate model railroad catalog. Most of the stuff in it was already not available because material shortages because of military production needs.

The two major manufacturers of stick and paper flying model kits were Megow and Comet. Megow had started producing HO car kits around selling for 50 cents complete with trucks (terrible) couplers and paint. A real bear to build. Sp Comet got in the anrket with HO bdy kits that sold for 35 cents. One thing Comet had going for them was that they made auto cars where almost everybody else just made refrigerator car with many choices of sides. Virtually nothing in the way of hoppers, gons, etc.

Varney car kits were very good and their trucks were the best availalbe. Mantua car kits were the top of what was available but unfortunately the beautiful trucks they supplied had a terrible amount of drag. Varney had a hopper car it made of foil covered crd stock that folded up into a car body. Virtually impossible to build and I never saw one completed. Walthers had a line of HO freight car kits that were almost entirely made up of type metal castings and they weighed a ton. You were supposed to solder sides and ends together, etc. Ony alternative to use Duco or model airplane cement both of which were virtually useless in holding metal parts together. (In my opinion one of the things that really changed model building was the comingy of epoxy cement)

As for the Wabash car kit having the correct radial roofk, I doubt if many modelers or manufactuer back then knew (or cared about) the difference between a regular and a radial roof!

Chuck Yungkurth
Louisville CO






--------------------------------------------

On Thu, 1/29/15, Jeff Pellas jppellas@aol.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [STMFC] e bay chuckle
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, January 29, 2015, 4:04 PM


 









All I can
say is, even though they're interesting, you do have to
be choosy when tackling one of those old wood kits --- and
be ready to improvise. That's why I'm a member of
this forum. I need the prototype knowledge to be able to
discern which of those kits is worth trying and which to
pass over. I determine this by how accurate a model I can
get given the limitations of the kit.  
      I've put a lot of work,
recently, into a kit that dates from the late 1930s by a
company called Comet. The prototype is a Wabash 40' SS,
double door auto car with 3-3-3 Dreadnaught ends. The
original kit consisted of a wood body, a single piece of
wood for the underframe, I single turned piece if wood for
the K brake cylinder/reservoir, a wooden peaked roof,
stamped copper roof ribs, and several very thin flat pieces
of wood that I was required to cut into various lengths to
make the roof walk details. The sides and ends were of
embossed card stock. Ladder was brass ladder stock and brake
wheel was, I think, cast metal.

     There were some
structural accuracy problems and many detail deficiencies
with this kit --on top of it being very primitive-- but the
one thing about it that made me decide to build it was that
I was able to determine that the embossed sides were
accurately lettered and numbered. I've made
massive changes to the kit and I'm about 90%
finished with it now but I'm satisfied enough with how
this has turned out that I'm going to build another
Comet kit of a similar car by Grand Trunk Western. 




Jeff


jppellas@aol.com








-----Original
Message-----

From: ed_mines@yahoo.com [STMFC]
<STMFC@yahoogroups.com>

To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>

Sent: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 2:57 pm

Subject: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



















Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid
covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic
kits of similar cars.







The screen roof walks look just like screens (not
like roof walks) and are always bent.







Getting rid of the wood grain is always
troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 








How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows
on that end look like windows in an armored
car.







Ed Mines
































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Re: National Type B Truck Longevity

Ian Cranstone
 


On 2015-01-30, at 4:34 PM, ealabhan0@... [STMFC] wrote:

 
The National Type B truck, while not as popular as the conventional AAR design, was nevertheless used on a number of freight car orders from Class I railroads and private owners.  I have two Resin Car Works ACF Type 27 acid tank cars on order, including one for Hooker Chemicals.  The Barriger Library's online builder photo of HOKX 219 clearly shows National Type B trucks, as built by ACF 12-39.  The question arose in my mind as to whether this car, and various others (i.e., ATSF Bx-37, SFRD Rr-29 and Rr-30, etc.), would have retained these trucks up through my 1958 modeling era, or if there had been some later prohibition against them as with the Allied Full Cushion trucks?  I found nothing in searching STMFC Files and Conversations.  Anyone know of any regulatory action, or of any reliability, maintenance, and/or cost factor that affected the service life of this distinctive truck, or National's revised Type B-1 version?

I don't know about a prohibition, but Canadian National decided in later years that they were not a fan of the design.  There were notes on a few diagram sheets by the 1970s that National B-1 trucks were not to be applied when cars were refurbished.



National Type B Truck Longevity

David Sieber
 

Group,

The National Type B truck, while not as popular as the conventional AAR design, was nevertheless used on a number of freight car orders from Class I railroads and private owners.  I have two Resin Car Works ACF Type 27 acid tank cars on order, including one for Hooker Chemicals.  The Barriger Library's online builder photo of HOKX 219 clearly shows National Type B trucks, as built by ACF 12-39.  The question arose in my mind as to whether this car, and various others (i.e., ATSF Bx-37, SFRD Rr-29 and Rr-30, etc.), would have retained these trucks up through my 1958 modeling era, or if there had been some later prohibition against them as with the Allied Full Cushion trucks?  I found nothing in searching STMFC Files and Conversations.  Anyone know of any regulatory action, or of any reliability, maintenance, and/or cost factor that affected the service life of this distinctive truck, or National's revised Type B-1 version?

Thanks in advance, Dave Sieber, Reno NV




wood freight car kits

ed_mines
 

Jeff Pellas is right. You have to pick the kits to build.


Some will look like crap no matter what & some will be real gems.


Sealing wood to look like metal is difficult.


I visited Bob Weaver in the early '80s. He was a giant guy and would have been even among professional football players.


He had many of his kits built and on display and each one was magnificent.


A couple of other observations from e bay -


- there were more excellent kit builders than I thought


- ditto for guys doing weathering; I even copy the photos


- some modelers use a coating that fogs (gets cloudy) as weathering - it looks overdone & reduces the value of the cars


- at least one person buys inexpensive kits and them  tries to resell them; I hope he buys a lot of junk


- cost of shipping has a lot to do with salability of kits


Ed Mines


Re: e bay chuckle

Doug Pillow
 

Have built two of the  Quality craft wood CF N&W cabooses over the years. Very accurate with the correct underframe. AMB kit has Athearn caboose under frame, I plan on replacing it with stryene when I build it.
 
                                                                                                                                Doug Pillow


Re: e bay chuckle

Andy Harman
 

I never really thought about just filling in the grooves.  

I still can't believe anyone still uses Squadron.

I think I'm going to pull out the kit and start troweling some Cypox on the sides.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 29, 2015, at 11:49 PM, "'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

The Q1 2015 edition of the NYC Modeler has an article by Seth Larkin on building some AMB kits and he converted one to a plywood sided car with Squadron white putty to fill in the grooves.  It seemed to work fairly nicely.  I suppose that you could also contact AMB to see if they would cut plywood sides for you...

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 10:35 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Andy the sides in the AMB kit may not be reversible, depending upon window placement, etc. It they are exact duplicates you could swap the two sides and have the smooth side out. But more they are not exact duplicates, in which case you would be better off using the sides as patterns to cut smooth sides out of styrene. Then you have the task of attaching styrene to wood.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org




Re: e bay chuckle

Andy Harman
 

Yeah styrene will be the answer.  I may cut other parts in plastic as well, depends on what I find.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 29, 2015, at 11:35 PM, "'Douglas Harding' doug.harding@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Andy the sides in the AMB kit may not be reversible, depending upon window placement, etc. It they are exact duplicates you could swap the two sides and have the smooth side out. But more they are not exact duplicates, in which case you would be better off using the sides as patterns to cut smooth sides out of styrene. Then you have the task of attaching styrene to wood.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: e bay chuckle

Andy Harman
 

The only N&W caboose available in plastic is the P2K northeast.  In spite of the variety that's the only one that can be correct out if the box.  Atlas makes a good stand-in for the C31 that is easily fixed, and an ok stand-in for the C8/C9 that can't be fixed.  The N&W "family"
Cabooses - CF, CG, CH, C30, C30A - not in plastic but OMI has done them.

IIRC BLI announced a CF around the time they released the H2 hoppers and Y6B but it never materialized.  I have the brass CH and C30A.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 30, 2015, at 9:29 AM, "David Bott dbott@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Sides are not reversible due to 'toilet' window. Also not sure whether peel and stick details would work with wall inside out. Aren't there plastic versions of plywood side CF?

Fortunately I need the as is CF for the  two the A&Y purchased. I have a partially built AMB and a painted brass version. Then I moved the date for my layout back 7 years before the cabs were used on the A&Y. 

I have a QC cab kitbashed by a friend to represent the ex-RF&P cab used in the 30s along with rented Southern woodies for A&Y.  The QC metal castings worked well, but even for usual sick built wood sides my friend substituted styrene.

I have some vent box wood cars I purchased built at a flea market, but I also prefer to build in styrene. I like uniform density and fracture properties. I don't like having to 'commune' with materials to know how they warp, cut or fracture!

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Jan 29, 2015, at 10:36 PM, Andy Harman gsgondola@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I just remembered... I have an AMB Laserkit of an N&W CF caboose.  This is one I have attempted three times to build from a QC kit- twice in HO scale and once in O scale.  All failed.

Thing is, I will be modeling a CF as rebuilt with plywood sides.  Not sure if I can reverse the sides so the smooth side is out, or just make them from styrene.

I also have a brass CF... NJI I think, never painted it.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 29, 2015, at 6:04 PM, "Jeff Pellas jppellas@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

All I can say is, even though they're interesting, you do have to be choosy when tackling one of those old wood kits --- and be ready to improvise. That's why I'm a member of this forum. I need the prototype knowledge to be able to discern which of those kits is worth trying and which to pass over. I determine this by how accurate a model I can get given the limitations of the kit.  
      I've put a lot of work, recently, into a kit that dates from the late 1930s by a company called Comet. The prototype is a Wabash 40' SS, double door auto car with 3-3-3 Dreadnaught ends. The original kit consisted of a wood body, a single piece of wood for the underframe, I single turned piece if wood for the K brake cylinder/reservoir, a wooden peaked roof, stamped copper roof ribs, and several very thin flat pieces of wood that I was required to cut into various lengths to make the roof walk details. The sides and ends were of embossed card stock. Ladder was brass ladder stock and brake wheel was, I think, cast metal.
     There were some structural accuracy problems and many detail deficiencies with this kit --on top of it being very primitive-- but the one thing about it that made me decide to build it was that I was able to determine that the embossed sides were accurately lettered and numbered. I've made massive changes to the kit and I'm about 90% finished with it now but I'm satisfied enough with how this has turned out that I'm going to build another Comet kit of a similar car by Grand Trunk Western. 



-----Original Message-----
From: ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 2:57 pm
Subject: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic kits of similar cars.

The screen roof walks look just like screens (not like roof walks) and are always bent.

Getting rid of the wood grain is always troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 

How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows on that end look like windows in an armored car.

Ed Mines



Re: e bay chuckle

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Sides are not reversible due to 'toilet' window. Also not sure whether peel and stick details would work with wall inside out. Aren't there plastic versions of plywood side CF?

Fortunately I need the as is CF for the  two the A&Y purchased. I have a partially built AMB and a painted brass version. Then I moved the date for my layout back 7 years before the cabs were used on the A&Y. 

I have a QC cab kitbashed by a friend to represent the ex-RF&P cab used in the 30s along with rented Southern woodies for A&Y.  The QC metal castings worked well, but even for usual sick built wood sides my friend substituted styrene.

I have some vent box wood cars I purchased built at a flea market, but I also prefer to build in styrene. I like uniform density and fracture properties. I don't like having to 'commune' with materials to know how they warp, cut or fracture!

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Jan 29, 2015, at 10:36 PM, Andy Harman gsgondola@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

I just remembered... I have an AMB Laserkit of an N&W CF caboose.  This is one I have attempted three times to build from a QC kit- twice in HO scale and once in O scale.  All failed.

Thing is, I will be modeling a CF as rebuilt with plywood sides.  Not sure if I can reverse the sides so the smooth side is out, or just make them from styrene.

I also have a brass CF... NJI I think, never painted it.

Sent from my overpriced graham cracker

On Jan 29, 2015, at 6:04 PM, "Jeff Pellas jppellas@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

All I can say is, even though they're interesting, you do have to be choosy when tackling one of those old wood kits --- and be ready to improvise. That's why I'm a member of this forum. I need the prototype knowledge to be able to discern which of those kits is worth trying and which to pass over. I determine this by how accurate a model I can get given the limitations of the kit.  
      I've put a lot of work, recently, into a kit that dates from the late 1930s by a company called Comet. The prototype is a Wabash 40' SS, double door auto car with 3-3-3 Dreadnaught ends. The original kit consisted of a wood body, a single piece of wood for the underframe, I single turned piece if wood for the K brake cylinder/reservoir, a wooden peaked roof, stamped copper roof ribs, and several very thin flat pieces of wood that I was required to cut into various lengths to make the roof walk details. The sides and ends were of embossed card stock. Ladder was brass ladder stock and brake wheel was, I think, cast metal.
     There were some structural accuracy problems and many detail deficiencies with this kit --on top of it being very primitive-- but the one thing about it that made me decide to build it was that I was able to determine that the embossed sides were accurately lettered and numbered. I've made massive changes to the kit and I'm about 90% finished with it now but I'm satisfied enough with how this has turned out that I'm going to build another Comet kit of a similar car by Grand Trunk Western. 



-----Original Message-----
From: ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thu, Jan 29, 2015 2:57 pm
Subject: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Jeff, I like wood kits too but those Ambroid covered hoppers are horrific and there are many nice plastic kits of similar cars.

The screen roof walks look just like screens (not like roof walks) and are always bent.

Getting rid of the wood grain is always troublesome  when wood is made to look like steel. 

How 'bout that D&H caboose? The  windows on that end look like windows in an armored car.

Ed Mines



Re: e bay chuckle

Bruce Smith
 

The Q1 2015 edition of the NYC Modeler has an article by Seth Larkin on building some AMB kits and he converted one to a plywood sided car with Squadron white putty to fill in the grooves.  It seemed to work fairly nicely.  I suppose that you could also contact AMB to see if they would cut plywood sides for you...

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 29, 2015 10:35 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] e bay chuckle



Andy the sides in the AMB kit may not be reversible, depending upon window placement, etc. It they are exact duplicates you could swap the two sides and have the smooth side out. But more they are not exact duplicates, in which case you would be better off using the sides as patterns to cut smooth sides out of styrene. Then you have the task of attaching styrene to wood.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org




Re: e bay chuckle

Douglas Harding
 

Andy the sides in the AMB kit may not be reversible, depending upon window placement, etc. It they are exact duplicates you could swap the two sides and have the smooth side out. But more they are not exact duplicates, in which case you would be better off using the sides as patterns to cut smooth sides out of styrene. Then you have the task of attaching styrene to wood.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

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