Date   

Re: Speaking Of Tank Cars…

Tony Thompson
 

No so.
I clearly stated, "Maybe the cargo was non-hazardous?"

     I was going by your opening sentence, which I took to represent your primary reaction to the photo:

>>I know there is and was a prohibition against putting hazardous cargo next to a locomotive.  Yet here are two Texaco tanks cars right behind the locomotive:<<

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Speaking Of Tank Cars…

thecitrusbelt@...
 

You're assuming that any tank car cargo is "hazardous,"

 

No so.

 

I clearly stated, "Maybe the cargo was non-hazardous?"


Re: Speaking Of Tank Cars…

Rufus Cone
 

In Ron V. Nixon Collection Image Record - RVN07837
http://morphotoarchive.org/rvndb/rvnjpeg_img_rec.php?objno=RVN07837
Caption: "SP&S 701, 4-8-4, similar to NP Class A locomotives is shot at Paradise with tank car in tow.

The SP&S 701 moved across the NP for shopping.  This tank car was to provide fuel for the locomotive as NP locomotives on the Idaho and Rocky Mountain divisions were coal burning, and no facilities for refueling an oil burning locomotive were available.

The online caption should read "similar to NP Class A-3 locomotives."
-- 
Rufus Cone
Bozeman, MT


Re: Speaking Of Tank Cars…

Guy Wilber
 

Bob wrote:

"So, was this a failure to comply with the rules, maybe due to wartime expediency?  Or perhaps the cars were completely empty and contained no hazardous fumes?  Maybe the cargo was non-hazardous?"

The Bureau of Explosives rules clearly contained no language "prohibiting" this positioning of tank cars (loaded or empty) behind locomotives or in front of a caboose IF the make up of the train was such that "five cars" separating the components could not be achieved. 

I can send you the text from the regulations tonight or later this week is someone doesn't beat me to the punch.  The number of cars called out between tank cars or house cars carrying hazardous materials or explosives varied from the early teens thru later years as well.  Five cars did become a standard if it was possible.  A full train of tank cars was obviously not going to comply and was addressed as such within the regulations as well.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Re: Speaking Of Tank Cars…

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

 
I know there is and was a prohibition against putting hazardous cargo next to a locomotive.  Yet here are two Texaco tanks cars right behind the locomotive:


So, was this a failure to comply with the rules, maybe due to wartime expediency?  Or perhaps the cars were completely empty and contained no hazardous fumes?  Maybe the cargo was non-hazardous?

   You're assuming that any tank car cargo is "hazardous," an attitude far less prevalent in the steam era. More importantly, the cars may have carried kerosene, for example, a widely used consumer product (and the silver Texaco cars were used for consumer products), which did not require any placard. Other cargoes such as Bunker C locomotive fuel would burn but quietly at ambient temperature. I also note in these photos that none of the tank cars displays a DANGEROUS placard of any kind.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Speaking Of Tank Cars…

Charles Morrill
 

Well the water filled tender is between the locomotive and tank car.  Does that count?
Charlie
 

Sent: Tuesday, February 03, 2015 11:25 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Speaking Of Tank Cars…
 


I know there is and was a prohibition against putting hazardous cargo next to a locomotive.  Yet here are two Texaco tanks cars right behind the locomotive:

 

http://morphotoarchive.org/rvndb/rvnjpeg_img_rec.php?objno=RVN11720

 

Mouse over the image to enlarge sections of the photo.

 

The caption reads: "NP X5121E with NP 5121, Class Z-7 pulling two tank cars immediately behind locomotive between Bonner and Missoula". The date is April 12, 1942.

 

So, was this a failure to comply with the rules, maybe due to wartime expediency?  Or perhaps the cars were completely empty and contained no hazardous fumes?  Maybe the cargo was non-hazardous?

 

And then there are these:

 

http://morphotoarchive.org/rvndb/rvnjpeg_img_rec.php?objno=RVN32195

 

http://morphotoarchive.org/rvndb/rvnjpeg_img_rec.php?objno=RVN32209

 

http://morphotoarchive.org/rvndb/rvnjpeg_img_rec.php?objno=RVN20553

 

http://morphotoarchive.org/rvndb/rvnjpeg_img_rec.php?objno=RVN07837

 

Comments?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Speaking Of Tank Cars…

thecitrusbelt@...
 

I know there is and was a prohibition against putting hazardous cargo next to a locomotive.  Yet here are two Texaco tanks cars right behind the locomotive:

 

http://morphotoarchive.org/rvndb/rvnjpeg_img_rec.php?objno=RVN11720

 

Mouse over the image to enlarge sections of the photo.

 

The caption reads: "NP X5121E with NP 5121, Class Z-7 pulling two tank cars immediately behind locomotive between Bonner and Missoula". The date is April 12, 1942.

 

So, was this a failure to comply with the rules, maybe due to wartime expediency?  Or perhaps the cars were completely empty and contained no hazardous fumes?  Maybe the cargo was non-hazardous?

 

And then there are these:

 

http://morphotoarchive.org/rvndb/rvnjpeg_img_rec.php?objno=RVN32195

 

http://morphotoarchive.org/rvndb/rvnjpeg_img_rec.php?objno=RVN32209

 

http://morphotoarchive.org/rvndb/rvnjpeg_img_rec.php?objno=RVN20553

 

http://morphotoarchive.org/rvndb/rvnjpeg_img_rec.php?objno=RVN07837

 

Comments?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Seaboard B-5 Boxcar

al_brown03
 

There are drawings in the group files section, entitled "Seaboard Air Line B5 Drawings". They aren't the easiest to read, so I'll look for some prototype and model photos when I get home tonight, unless someone beats me to it.

 

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


 


Seaboard B-5 Boxcar

Jeff Pellas <jppellas@...>
 

Kit bashing a Seaboard B-5. Looking for either a photo or diagram of the underside. A photo of the Sunshine model would work. Thanks in advance!  

Jeff
jppellas@...


Re: Yarmouth stirrups

peteraue
 

The holes in the hatch stops are designed for .0125" diameter wire and # 80 drill bits.
The mounting pins of the sill steps comfortably fit into the holes in the InterMountain underframe. If you need to drill your own holes, use a # 78 drill bit for a tight fit. If you find it too tight use a # 77 drill bit.

Peter Aue


Re: Can you ID this 1957 TOFC?

Brian Carlson
 

I realize I am late to the party but the TOFC flat could also be an LV one. They too were painter a reddish color. LV, DL&W both had interline service to chicago over the NKP. I have photos of DL&W trailers on LV flats. I don't own the photos or I would post them.

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY

 

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, February 02, 2015 3:45 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Can you ID this 1957 TOFC?

 

 

 

 

I would strongly suggest that it is a DL&W trailer -- the style and letteing scheme fits (angled Route of Phoebe Snow lettering, similar to the boxcars), as does the silver roof. That flat car is not from the DL&W, however, and Tim's suggestion of a C&NW TOFC flat is a good one. 

 

               ....Mike Del Vecchio

 




Re: Future floor finish

Douglas Harding
 

Bob, Pledge Floor Care is the new name Johnson & Johnson now calls “Future”. The name doesn’t matter as long as it is 100% acrylic.

 

Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 


Re: Future floor finish

Bob DeMoss
 

 I was at a clinic put on by the PSR, Cajon Division this last Saturday, and one member uses PLEDGE Floor Care, Multi Surface / Finish (bottle with Boots on label) to apply decals.  He apply's Pledge on car, than puts on decal, and a light coat of Pledge over.  Dull coat over to remove gloss.

Bob DeMoss
SFSCRR
 
 

On 02/01/15, 'Schuyler Larrabee' schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]com> wrote:
 
 

I’ve had a bottle of this for some time, and I think I have a candidate for using it to obtain a gloss surface for decaling.

 

I know that using this has been discussed, but if this specific question was addressed, I missed it:

 

Is it OK to use straight out of the bottle, or should it be thinned down?  And if so, with what?  Water?

Schuyler


Re: Model Railway Hobbyist article - Multiple-Compartment Tank Cars

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 2/2/2015 6:49 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:

It sounds like Jon has problems with the Adobe reader, which has
definitely become more unusable with time.

        Problems fixed and started reading the article.  Really good.  If you like tank cars you can't do with out this.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Photos needed: HPCX and COSX

al_brown03
 

There's a photo of COSX 935 in RMJ 6/08, p 15.

There are photos of COSX 947 and 941 in Kaminski, "Tank Cars AC&F", pp 105 and 106 respectively, but these are both two-compartment cars built by AC&F.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: Model Railway Hobbyist article - Multiple-Compartment Tank Cars

Marty McGuirk
 

I also really enjoyed reading Richard's fine article in MRH. 

He had two other articles in MRH that I recall - both truly in depth. 
One was his "survey" of HO freight car truck cars. 
His first MRH article was on panel-side hoppers and appeared in the second or third issue. 

Marty McGuirk


Re: Model Railway Hobbyist article - Multiple-Compartment Tank Cars

Tim O'Connor
 


It sounds like Jon has problems with the Adobe reader, which has
definitely become more unusable with time. Fortunately PDF is a well
known file format and as long as you can download the file, there are
other programs that can display PDF files. Just Google for them.

Tim O'



I'd really like to look at this but Adobe just will not cooperate.  It keeps saying it won't install with IE and when I shut IE off then it still doesn't install the latest version.

    Computer problems are, of course, off topic for this list, but there IS some fine freight car info in the February MRH. Keep trying other avenues, Jon. And BTW, it is hardly Adobe's fault. The MRH issue downloads just fine with Firefox and Safari both.

Tony Thompson 


Re: Mathieson Dry Ice Reefer

Bruce Smith
 

Lester,

Page 68 of PRR Color Guide to Freight and Passenger Equipment (vol 1) by Sweetland and Yanosey, shows NX 8850, a former PRR R7 in dry ice service in May 1963.  The photo shows "DRY ICE" lettering but the other panel on the side appears to be masked.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, February 02, 2015 4:49 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Mathieson Dry Ice Reefer



After finishing a Westerfield resin DS MILW box car I thought it might be fun to build a Ambroid Company wood Mathieson Dry Ice refrigerator,  kit No 7, in the One of Five Thousand series that I picked up in an estate sale many years back.   After looking at the kit plan sheet the only photo of a car that I can find that is like the Mathieson car is the photo of FGEX 43982, an ex-PRR Class R7 using the same steel superstructure frame design of the X23 box car in the book "The Postwar Freight Car Fleet" by Kline and Culotta.

So, asking for help in directing me to a photo of a wood Mathieson Dry Ice refrigerator.   Thank you in advance for your time and effort to help.   Lester Breuer





Re: MTH Paint Remover

John Sykes III
 

OK, here it is again.

Butyl cellosolve (2-butoxy ethanol) is available in one gallon cans at large Sherwin Williams Paint stores (it is used by professional cabinet makers to slow down lacquer drying, or so I was told).  It is around $55/gal, so you might want to get a whole club to share the expense.  The formula for Chameleon or Wash-Away paint stripper is roughly the following:

Buy a 1 pint bottle of 91% isopropyl alcohol at WalMart or any pharmacy.

Measure out 4 oz of the isopropyl and throw it away (or use it for something else).

DO NOT USE 70% ISOPROPYL!  IT WON'T WORK RIGHT.

Replace the 4 oz taken out of the bottle with an equal amount of butyl cellosolve.  Put top back on and shake well.  Make sure to label your new paint stripper, so you don't goof and use it for alcohol.

Butyl cellosolve is also the active ingredient in Hobsco Solvaset, but I haven't found the proportions yet (I think it is just butyl cellosolve in distilled water but don't know if it is 2%, 5% or whatever).

-- John



Re: Mathieson Dry Ice Reefer

Todd Horton
 

The line to Saltville was an N&W branch line. I read somewhere that it was one of the most prosperous branch lines on the N&W. That’s hard to believe considering the coal traffic on the N&W but I do recall reading that somewhere.   Todd Horton

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, February 02, 2015 7:32 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Mathieson Dry Ice Reefer

 

 

Friends,

Saltville was an interesting place. Once a huge producer of chemicals, especially nitrates, it is now a shell of its former self. There are several locomotives plinthed in the city park, and when I was there several years ago there were freight cars (mandatory FC content) and cabooses scattered at several places around the town, remnants of a failed attempt to turn the branch line into a tourist road. The railroad had been shut down for years when I was there in the early 90s, and I'm sure all the track and equipment (except the steamers) has been removed.

My 1958 ORER lists 94 cars as belonging to Olin Mathieson Chemical Corportation. Of these, 44 were 10K tank cars operated by Republic Tank Car Co. for them under the SASX reporting marks. There were also two 10K tanks operated by Mathieson themselves under the CBMX reporting marks. The remaining 48 MAWX cars were dry ice cars of various types, many of them single cars or small lots of 2-3. What a mess! Home points for the dry ice cars were Chicago, Rochester, NY, and Saltville, VA.

I'm not sure of the parentage of the branch, but I think it might have belonged to the N&W at one time. It certainly connected with their system, so these dry ice cars would have been a seen in N&W freights.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 2/2/15 6:54 PM, Matthew Hurst handbt33@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

If you have RPR Cyc 15, there is a photo of a Mathieson Dry Ice reefer on page 77. Photo taken in Saltville, VA in 1952.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Matthew Hurst

 

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