Date   

Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Cyril Durrenberger
 

This model is very different from the car shown in the photo. This model looks to be a flat car that has had a tank placed on it. This was not done very often and the few times this approach was used it was with narrow gauge cars or in some cases for cars used in maintenance service. Most early tank cars had an underframe that was different from the ones used on flat cars. Another point to make is that after 1904 tank cars were built with steel underframes.

Cyril Durrenberger
--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 2/27/15, 'Claus Schlund HGM' claus@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, February 27, 2015, 11:33 PM


 












Hi List
Members,
 
In N scale, Fine N Scale
Products makes a cast
resin kit for a car of similar era and
construction.
 
See image
below.
 
http://www.finenscale.com/images/2103_2104Tankcar.jpg
 
  -  Claus
Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----

From:
'Schuyler Larrabee'
schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC@...

Sent: Friday,
February 27, 2015 8:30
PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC]
Re: Digital Images -
University of Kentucky's Digital Library



LaBelle makes (or made) a
model of what could well be this specific car.  I built
it longer ago
than I want to think about, as a teenager.  Still have
it, too.  It
may have straight-pin Kadees on it, and IIRC, pizza cutter
wheels.  Hard
not to break off the railings.  I should dig that car out
. .
.
 
Schuyler
 



Subject:
Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of
Kentucky’s Digital
Library
 
 





Scott Haycock
wrote:




 


Here's an
interesting tank car. The photo is undated.
Does anyone know about these cars?


http://kdl.kyvl.org/catalog/xt7sf7664q86_5953_1

 

    Many tank cars
around the end of the 19th
century had side walkways like this. See any historical
collection.
 




Tony Thompson  
          Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley,
CA

2906 Forest Ave.,
Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538;
fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...

Publishers of
books on railroad history


 
 
 













#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893 --
#yiv7838810893ygrp-mkp {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px
0;padding:0 10px;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-mkp hr {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-mkp #yiv7838810893hd {
color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px
0;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-mkp #yiv7838810893ads {
margin-bottom:10px;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-mkp .yiv7838810893ad {
padding:0 0;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-mkp .yiv7838810893ad p {
margin:0;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-mkp .yiv7838810893ad a {
color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}
#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-sponsor
#yiv7838810893ygrp-lc {
font-family:Arial;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-sponsor
#yiv7838810893ygrp-lc #yiv7838810893hd {
margin:10px
0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-sponsor
#yiv7838810893ygrp-lc .yiv7838810893ad {
margin-bottom:10px;padding:0 0;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893actions {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:11px;padding:10px 0;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893activity {
background-color:#e0ecee;float:left;font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;padding:10px;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893activity span {
font-weight:700;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893activity span:first-child {
text-transform:uppercase;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893activity span a {
color:#5085b6;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893activity span span {
color:#ff7900;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893activity span
.yiv7838810893underline {
text-decoration:underline;}

#yiv7838810893 .yiv7838810893attach {
clear:both;display:table;font-family:Arial;font-size:12px;padding:10px
0;width:400px;}

#yiv7838810893 .yiv7838810893attach div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv7838810893 .yiv7838810893attach img {
border:none;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv7838810893 .yiv7838810893attach label {
display:block;margin-bottom:5px;}

#yiv7838810893 .yiv7838810893attach label a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv7838810893 blockquote {
margin:0 0 0 4px;}

#yiv7838810893 .yiv7838810893bold {
font-family:Arial;font-size:13px;font-weight:700;}

#yiv7838810893 .yiv7838810893bold a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv7838810893 dd.yiv7838810893last p a {
font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv7838810893 dd.yiv7838810893last p span {
margin-right:10px;font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv7838810893 dd.yiv7838810893last p
span.yiv7838810893yshortcuts {
margin-right:0;}

#yiv7838810893 div.yiv7838810893attach-table div div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv7838810893 div.yiv7838810893attach-table {
width:400px;}

#yiv7838810893 div.yiv7838810893file-title a, #yiv7838810893
div.yiv7838810893file-title a:active, #yiv7838810893
div.yiv7838810893file-title a:hover, #yiv7838810893
div.yiv7838810893file-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv7838810893 div.yiv7838810893photo-title a,
#yiv7838810893 div.yiv7838810893photo-title a:active,
#yiv7838810893 div.yiv7838810893photo-title a:hover,
#yiv7838810893 div.yiv7838810893photo-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv7838810893 div#yiv7838810893ygrp-mlmsg
#yiv7838810893ygrp-msg p a span.yiv7838810893yshortcuts {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;font-weight:normal;}

#yiv7838810893 .yiv7838810893green {
color:#628c2a;}

#yiv7838810893 .yiv7838810893MsoNormal {
margin:0 0 0 0;}

#yiv7838810893 o {
font-size:0;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893photos div {
float:left;width:72px;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893photos div div {
border:1px solid
#666666;height:62px;overflow:hidden;width:62px;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893photos div label {
color:#666666;font-size:10px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;white-space:nowrap;width:64px;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893reco-category {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893reco-desc {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv7838810893 .yiv7838810893replbq {
margin:4px;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-actbar div a:first-child {
margin-right:2px;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-mlmsg {
font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean,
sans-serif;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-mlmsg table {
font-size:inherit;font:100%;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-mlmsg select,
#yiv7838810893 input, #yiv7838810893 textarea {
font:99% Arial, Helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-mlmsg pre, #yiv7838810893
code {
font:115% monospace;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-mlmsg * {
line-height:1.22em;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-mlmsg #yiv7838810893logo {
padding-bottom:10px;}


#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-msg p a {
font-family:Verdana;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-msg
p#yiv7838810893attach-count span {
color:#1E66AE;font-weight:700;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-reco
#yiv7838810893reco-head {
color:#ff7900;font-weight:700;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-reco {
margin-bottom:20px;padding:0px;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-sponsor #yiv7838810893ov
li a {
font-size:130%;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-sponsor #yiv7838810893ov
li {
font-size:77%;list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-sponsor #yiv7838810893ov
ul {
margin:0;padding:0 0 0 8px;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-text {
font-family:Georgia;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-text p {
margin:0 0 1em 0;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-text tt {
font-size:120%;}

#yiv7838810893 #yiv7838810893ygrp-vital ul li:last-child {
border-right:none !important;
}
#yiv7838810893


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

tyesac@...
 

Makes perfect sense if the idea is that most freight car designs seem to have evolved from a basic flat car.   I also just happened to notice that there isn't a single tie plate to be seen.
 
Tom Casey
Scott Haycock wrote:

 
Here's an interesting tank car. The photo is undated. Does anyone know about these cars?

    Many tank cars around the end of the 19th century had side walkways like this. See any historical collection.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.s ignaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] To: STMFC
Sent: Fri, Feb 27, 2015 9:45 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

 
Scott Haycock wrote:

 
Here's an interesting tank car. The photo is undated. Does anyone know about these cars?

    Many tank cars around the end of the 19th century had side walkways like this. See any historical collection.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.s ignaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi List Members,
 
In N scale, Fine N Scale Products makes a cast resin kit for a car of similar era and construction.
 
See image below.
 
 
  -  Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 8:30 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

LaBelle makes (or made) a model of what could well be this specific car.  I built it longer ago than I want to think about, as a teenager.  Still have it, too.  It may have straight-pin Kadees on it, and IIRC, pizza cutter wheels.  Hard not to break off the railings.  I should dig that car out . . .

 

Schuyler

 


Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

 

 

Scott Haycock wrote:



 

Here's an interesting tank car. The photo is undated. Does anyone know about these cars?

 

    Many tank cars around the end of the 19th century had side walkways like this. See any historical collection.

 

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...

Publishers of books on railroad history

 

 

 


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

Cyril Durrenberger
 

This is a common design used by the Union Tank Line from the 1880's until the after 1910. There were other tank cars built with a similar design, but with differences in details such as truss rods, walks, saddles, head blocks and other items. These are for cars that are earlier than the era of most interest to members of this list. The LaBelle kit is a simplistic model of these cars, but Silver Crash Car Works offered a good model of these cars in two versions. The lettering schemes offered with the LaBelle kit were used, but were put on cars that do not match the model. The lettering schemes offered with the SCCW kit are accurate and are based on photos of these cars. There are plans for these UTL cars in early editions of the Car Builders Cyclopedia and similar references.

Cyril Durrenberger
--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 2/27/15, 'Scott H. Haycock ' shhaycock@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library
To: "Steam Era Freight Cars" <STMFC@...>
Date: Friday, February 27, 2015, 9:40 PM


 









Here's an
interesting tank car. The photo is undated. Does anyone know
about these cars?

http://kdl.kyvl.org/catalog/xt7sf7664q86_5953_1


Scott
Haycock












#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434 --
#yiv4082706434ygrp-mkp {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;font-family:Arial;margin:10px
0;padding:0 10px;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-mkp hr {
border:1px solid #d8d8d8;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-mkp #yiv4082706434hd {
color:#628c2a;font-size:85%;font-weight:700;line-height:122%;margin:10px
0;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-mkp #yiv4082706434ads {
margin-bottom:10px;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-mkp .yiv4082706434ad {
padding:0 0;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-mkp .yiv4082706434ad p {
margin:0;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-mkp .yiv4082706434ad a {
color:#0000ff;text-decoration:none;}
#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-sponsor
#yiv4082706434ygrp-lc {
font-family:Arial;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-sponsor
#yiv4082706434ygrp-lc #yiv4082706434hd {
margin:10px
0px;font-weight:700;font-size:78%;line-height:122%;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-sponsor
#yiv4082706434ygrp-lc .yiv4082706434ad {
margin-bottom:10px;padding:0 0;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434actions {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:11px;padding:10px 0;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434activity {
background-color:#e0ecee;float:left;font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;padding:10px;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434activity span {
font-weight:700;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434activity span:first-child {
text-transform:uppercase;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434activity span a {
color:#5085b6;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434activity span span {
color:#ff7900;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434activity span
.yiv4082706434underline {
text-decoration:underline;}

#yiv4082706434 .yiv4082706434attach {
clear:both;display:table;font-family:Arial;font-size:12px;padding:10px
0;width:400px;}

#yiv4082706434 .yiv4082706434attach div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4082706434 .yiv4082706434attach img {
border:none;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv4082706434 .yiv4082706434attach label {
display:block;margin-bottom:5px;}

#yiv4082706434 .yiv4082706434attach label a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4082706434 blockquote {
margin:0 0 0 4px;}

#yiv4082706434 .yiv4082706434bold {
font-family:Arial;font-size:13px;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4082706434 .yiv4082706434bold a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4082706434 dd.yiv4082706434last p a {
font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4082706434 dd.yiv4082706434last p span {
margin-right:10px;font-family:Verdana;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4082706434 dd.yiv4082706434last p
span.yiv4082706434yshortcuts {
margin-right:0;}

#yiv4082706434 div.yiv4082706434attach-table div div a {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4082706434 div.yiv4082706434attach-table {
width:400px;}

#yiv4082706434 div.yiv4082706434file-title a, #yiv4082706434
div.yiv4082706434file-title a:active, #yiv4082706434
div.yiv4082706434file-title a:hover, #yiv4082706434
div.yiv4082706434file-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4082706434 div.yiv4082706434photo-title a,
#yiv4082706434 div.yiv4082706434photo-title a:active,
#yiv4082706434 div.yiv4082706434photo-title a:hover,
#yiv4082706434 div.yiv4082706434photo-title a:visited {
text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4082706434 div#yiv4082706434ygrp-mlmsg
#yiv4082706434ygrp-msg p a span.yiv4082706434yshortcuts {
font-family:Verdana;font-size:10px;font-weight:normal;}

#yiv4082706434 .yiv4082706434green {
color:#628c2a;}

#yiv4082706434 .yiv4082706434MsoNormal {
margin:0 0 0 0;}

#yiv4082706434 o {
font-size:0;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434photos div {
float:left;width:72px;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434photos div div {
border:1px solid
#666666;height:62px;overflow:hidden;width:62px;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434photos div label {
color:#666666;font-size:10px;overflow:hidden;text-align:center;white-space:nowrap;width:64px;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434reco-category {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434reco-desc {
font-size:77%;}

#yiv4082706434 .yiv4082706434replbq {
margin:4px;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-actbar div a:first-child {
margin-right:2px;padding-right:5px;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-mlmsg {
font-size:13px;font-family:Arial, helvetica, clean,
sans-serif;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-mlmsg table {
font-size:inherit;font:100%;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-mlmsg select,
#yiv4082706434 input, #yiv4082706434 textarea {
font:99% Arial, Helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-mlmsg pre, #yiv4082706434
code {
font:115% monospace;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-mlmsg * {
line-height:1.22em;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-mlmsg #yiv4082706434logo {
padding-bottom:10px;}


#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-msg p a {
font-family:Verdana;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-msg
p#yiv4082706434attach-count span {
color:#1E66AE;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-reco
#yiv4082706434reco-head {
color:#ff7900;font-weight:700;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-reco {
margin-bottom:20px;padding:0px;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-sponsor #yiv4082706434ov
li a {
font-size:130%;text-decoration:none;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-sponsor #yiv4082706434ov
li {
font-size:77%;list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-sponsor #yiv4082706434ov
ul {
margin:0;padding:0 0 0 8px;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-text {
font-family:Georgia;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-text p {
margin:0 0 1em 0;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-text tt {
font-size:120%;}

#yiv4082706434 #yiv4082706434ygrp-vital ul li:last-child {
border-right:none !important;
}
#yiv4082706434


Re: Wood running boards

Ed Hawkins
 


On Feb 27, 2015, at 8:06 PM, Robert rdkirkham@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

I think my question leads to another: for most of the models you run, do you replace the running board or use the one provided in the kit.  I guess the right answer is “Depends on the prototype”, but very often the photos one works from don’t show enough to judge.  To me this form of running board lateral walk seems unusual, so I think I will tend to replace or modify it (unless I have proto info).

Rob,
Regarding the question about 1937 AAR box cars with wood running boards and the HO-scale version supplied by Innovative Model Works/Red Caboose and InterMountain, I can verify at least 3 roads that used them (there may be others).

Southern Pacific 1937 AAR box cars in classes B-50-18 and B-50-19 (built in 1936-1937) had them. A good overhead view of one appears on page 264 of Tony’s book Southern Pacific Freight Cars Volume 4: Box Cars. 

Southern’s 1937 AAR box cars built in 1937-1939, and B&O M-55 box cars built in 1940 also used this version. The B&O cars had roofs with depressed end panels, but the latitudinal boards appear to match the model. 

The model companies followed the 1937 A.A.R. box car drawing published in the Car Builders’ Cyclopedia even though this running board version may not have been the most common with regard to the latitudinal boards. These models date to the early 1990s, and we now have many more resources (photos and prototype drawings) available to use. 
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Schuyler Larrabee
 

LaBelle makes (or made) a model of what could well be this specific car.  I built it longer ago than I want to think about, as a teenager.  Still have it, too.  It may have straight-pin Kadees on it, and IIRC, pizza cutter wheels.  Hard not to break off the railings.  I should dig that car out . . .

 

Schuyler

 


Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

 

 

Scott Haycock wrote:



 

Here's an interesting tank car. The photo is undated. Does anyone know about these cars?

 

    Many tank cars around the end of the 19th century had side walkways like this. See any historical collection.

 

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...

Publishers of books on railroad history

 

 

 


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

Tony Thompson
 

Scott Haycock wrote:

 
Here's an interesting tank car. The photo is undated. Does anyone know about these cars?

    Many tank cars around the end of the 19th century had side walkways like this. See any historical collection.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Wood running boards

Tim O'Connor
 

The stencils applied to the sides of many box cars after 1966 read

"KEEP OFF ROOF -- NO RUNNING BOARD"

I know it's after the STMFC era, but that pretty much settled it for me.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

Scott H. Haycock
 

Here's an interesting tank car. The photo is undated. Does anyone know about these cars?




Scott Haycock



Re: Wood running boards

Mikebrock
 

Paul Hillman asks:

"Is "caboose" an official term, or is another name more "official"? I don't care."

Well, rest assured...even if you don't care...that the term "caboose" is an official, acceptable, railroad term. My "official" UP Frt Conductor Book has the heading, "Caboose" clearly spelled out on the page where a train's consist is shown. Therefore, "Caboose" is an official term for the STMFC.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: CH&D&PM System what is it

David
 

This was the brief 1904-06 or so affiliation of CH&D and PM (and Chicago Cincinnati & Louisville later in the period), billed as the "Great Central Route".

Car itself is from PM series 32000-33249, built by ACF circa March 1905 Lot 3478. Door has simple railroad initials and number on it. The left side of the car had a large white oval with the road number, and an arched "P.M.R.R." flanking the top of the oval.

David Thompson


Re: Car Movement Forms/Documents

Mikebrock
 

To perhaps add a bit of confusion to this discussion, from the Mark 1 Video, "Omaha, Metropolis on the Plains" [ close to it anyhow ], at the UP yard at Council Bluff, a film shot during the late 40's or early '50's shows a clerk processing what are called "Destination Tags". These are then attached to the various frt cars. Each tag has a number...0-7...sometimes with an additional letter like "b". The film shows some...as in "4" and "4b". My UP Frt Conductor Book shows destinations for westbound trains including these numbers. The film says the clerk indicates "4b" for LA. Sometimes the book shows SP-1 or LA-4. OTOH, eastbound trains do not use this system. [ at least in the book ]. Instead, mile markers or simply a city's name [ KC ] is used.

It appears that the number code refers...at least in some cases...to track numbers at Ogden, UT. Still, we are confronted with La4. 4B, 4, Sp1B, SP1 on the same train. At any rate, these "tags" seem to satisfy number 3 in Jim Betz's car movement list...from Council Bluff to wherever west.

Mike Brock


Re: Wood running boards

Paul Hillman
 

Yeah, like I prefer caboose over "way car" and all the other terms. Is "caboose" an official term, or is another name more "official"? I don't care. They are all cabooses to me. Some call them cabeese (plural). I'm sure that is not correct, at all, except as a "joke"?
 
Paul Hillman
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 8:07 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Wood running boards

 

Funny about RR nomenclature. I cringe every time I read or hear spoken "Outside Braced" to refer to single sheathed freight cars. When it comes to the boards provided by the RRs for passage of workers, I like the term "Roof Walk", and though I am reminded often that this is not an "appropriate" term, I use it more often than "running board". As was mentioned, the term is recognized easily for what it is, but I wouldn't consider myself to be "less informed" for using it. Maybe just slightly rebellious?

YMMV
-Andy Carlson
Ojai Ca
















Wood running boards

Andy Carlson
 

Funny about RR nomenclature. I cringe every time I read or hear spoken "Outside Braced" to refer to single sheathed freight cars. When it comes to the boards provided by the RRs for passage of workers, I like the term "Roof Walk", and though I am reminded often that this is not an "appropriate" term, I use it more often than "running board". As was mentioned, the term is recognized easily for what it is, but I wouldn't consider myself to be "less informed" for using it. Maybe just slightly rebellious?

YMMV
-Andy Carlson
Ojai Ca
















Re: Wood running boards

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks for the clarification Mike. 
 
I think my question leads to another: for most of the models you run, do you replace the running board or use the one provided in the kit.  I guess the right answer is “Depends on the prototype”, but very often the photos one works from don’t show enough to judge.  To me this form of running board lateral walk seems unusual, so I think I will tend to replace or modify it (unless I have proto info).
 
Rob
 

Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 2:39 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood running boards
 


An apology to the Group----

I was in error  in commenting about the seemingly odd lateral wood running board design (included in the 1937 InterMountain boxcar kits) that Rob K. had asked about.  I said that they were applied to the 1935/1937 ERIE milk cars as described in RP CYC #19.  That was not correct.  However, in that article the illustration of the Viking Chicago-Hutchins roof featured that running board design.  The ERIE cars used the more common/conventional lateral design which Rob expected more appropriate for the typical 1937 AAR car.

Sorry if there was confusion----Mike Schleigh


On Monday, February 23, 2015 10:22 AM, "jcdworkingonthenp@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
    In the files I had posted some information about running boards, find it the file marked Running Boards that covers part of the steam era and also gives a general observation on wooden running board replacemet times  Jim Dick - chilly St Paul, MN 



Re: double sheathed box cars

riverman_vt@...
 

    Just how "late" are you speaking of here Ed? The Rutland had plenty of good wood nearby but acquired 
its last doublesheathed cars in 1924. I believe the D&H switched to steel rather late but that was Loree's
way of doing things, ten to twenty years behind everyone else. The B&M also had good wood nearby and
a great car shop in Concord, NH but had given up on doublesheathed cars with its USRA group and even
gave up on new single sheathed cars by the early 1930's. Most of the New England roads ordered only
steel sheathed cars after 1935 but I cannot comment about the mid-Atlantic roads.

Cordially, Don Valentine.


Re: Wood running boards

Pierre Oliver
 

Bet you a nickel it lasts most of the weekend.
The bigger question is who will wind up in jail over it? :-)
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 2/27/2015 8:42 PM, markstation01 markstation01@... [STMFC] wrote:

 
I wonder how long this will go back and forth; roof walks vs. running boards


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "'sartherdj@...' sartherdj@... [STMFC]"
Date:02/27/2015 8:27 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood running boards

 

I just pulled out my AFE's for the CB&Q 40' Combo Door Cars to see which term the "Q" used.  Their AFE's for their XM-2 and XM-2A 40' cars refer to them as RUNNING BOARDS.
 
Later,  Dave Sarther
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Fri, Feb 27, 2015 6:08 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood running boards

 
Wood(en) or steel running boards exist only in the hobby world. In the real world (prototype) they are known as roof walks.

   Wrong. Look at any issue of Car Builders Cyclopedia or Railway Age, certainly at least as late as 1960.  Drawings (AAR or builder), descriptions and manufacturer's ads ALL use the same terminology, as does the set of definitions in the front of the Cyc. Professionally there is no question whatever that it was "running board." What the average switchman may have said is hard to be sure about and in any case not professional engineering language. We won't misunderstand you if you call it a "roof walk," but we will know you are not well informed.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.s ignaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: CH&D&PM System what is it

Benjamin Hom
 

Rich Orr asked:
"What is the name of the road in the boxcar left side of the photo and what is the framed area to the right of the herald?"

Not just one railroad, but two affiliated railroads - Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton (CH&D) and the Pere Marquette (PM).

Ben Hom


Re: Wood running boards

Richard Bale
 

Ed...
 
Here is a verbatim quote from the Dictionary of Car Terms from my copy of the 1940 Car Builders Cyclopedia:
 
Running Board. A plane surface, made of boards or special metal structure, for trainmen to walk or run on. It is placed on the roof of box, stock, refrigerator and covered hopper cars and at the side of tank cars. Gondola, hopper and flat cars usually have none.
 
The term roof walk does not appear in the 1940 edition. To be certain I also checked the 1879, 1919, 1931, 1946, 1953, 1970 and 1984 editions of Car Builders Dictionary and Car Builders Cyclopedia. They all list Running Board, none list roof walk. I'm interested in learning about any contradictory information you can cite for us.
 
Covered hopper cars are included in the my 1940 edition but I suspect they first appeared sometime earlier. 
 
Richard Bale


Re: Wood running boards

markstation01 <markstation01@...>
 

I wonder how long this will go back and forth; roof walks vs. running boards


Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: "'sartherdj@...' sartherdj@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
Date:02/27/2015 8:27 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood running boards

 

I just pulled out my AFE's for the CB&Q 40' Combo Door Cars to see which term the "Q" used.  Their AFE's for their XM-2 and XM-2A 40' cars refer to them as RUNNING BOARDS.
 
Later,  Dave Sarther
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Fri, Feb 27, 2015 6:08 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood running boards

 
Wood(en) or steel running boards exist only in the hobby world. In the real world (prototype) they are known as roof walks.

   Wrong. Look at any issue of Car Builders Cyclopedia or Railway Age, certainly at least as late as 1960.  Drawings (AAR or builder), descriptions and manufacturer's ads ALL use the same terminology, as does the set of definitions in the front of the Cyc. Professionally there is no question whatever that it was "running board." What the average switchman may have said is hard to be sure about and in any case not professional engineering language. We won't misunderstand you if you call it a "roof walk," but we will know you are not well informed.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.s ignaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




62621 - 62640 of 194744