Date   

Re: Wood running boards

Bill Welch
 

Since there has been some discussion as to the correct terminology of the wood and steel things on top of some freight cars, I would like to underscore Ed's use of the term "latitudinal" in reference to those components of the running board system that are perpendicular to the boards that ran the length of a boxcar. Years ago a freight car historian I trust, Frank Peacock educated me about the correct name "latitudinal" for these parts.

Bill Welch


X type Tank Cars

Gary Wildung
 

Any information on when the X type tank cars are to be made in HO?
Thanks Gary 


Re: Silver Crash Car Works -University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 2/28/2015 6:54 AM, wlhoss@... [STMFC] wrote:
�

In a message dated 2/27/2015 11:19:05 P.M. Central Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:
snip ...... but Silver Crash Car Works offered a good model of these cars in two versions.
�
I've been trying for several weeks to access the Silver Crash Car Works web site and can't.� Is it just me or is the site down.�
�

It's temporarily down. There internet provider folded and they are seeking another one.

Spen Kellogg


Silver Crash Car Works -University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

wlhoss@...
 

In a message dated 2/27/2015 11:19:05 P.M. Central Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:
snip ...... but Silver Crash Car Works offered a good model of these cars in two versions.
 
I've been trying for several weeks to access the Silver Crash Car Works web site and can't.  Is it just me or is the site down. 
 
Bill Hoss


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Yes.  In the 1930’s UTLX experimented with converting older Type V tank cars into what was, essentially, a covered hopper car.  Note that there is a letter H on the end of the car, where their tank cars were marked as X or X-3, etc. The lack of center sills on the Van Dyke tank cars allowed them to presage the “Center Flow” cars by nearly 30 years.

 

The safety valves have been removed and a circular plate riveted over their location on the domes.

 

Actually a very cool find, there were not that many of these experimental cars.  So, an in-service shot is very interesting.

 

Regards,

Steve Hile

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 6:55 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

 

 

On 2015-02-28, at 6:53 AM, jaydeet2001@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Definitely unusual. It's a 3-compartment conversion of what was originally a single-dome Type V frameless tank car. Also appears to be lacking any safety valves for the domes.

Actually, if you have a closer look you'll notice a hatch on the top of the tank body at the near end.  It turns out that UTLX 81014 is a tank car that has had a second conversion, this time to an AAR type "LT", which is a tank style car for handling dry commodities.  That's why there are no safety valves on the domes.

 


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Ian Cranstone
 

On 2015-02-28, at 6:53 AM, jaydeet2001@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Definitely unusual. It's a 3-compartment conversion of what was originally a single-dome Type V frameless tank car. Also appears to be lacking any safety valves for the domes.

Actually, if you have a closer look you'll notice a hatch on the top of the tank body at the near end.  It turns out that UTLX 81014 is a tank car that has had a second conversion, this time to an AAR type "LT", which is a tank style car for handling dry commodities.  That's why there are no safety valves on the domes.


Re: Digital Images - Univ ersity of Kentucky’s Digital Library

David
 

Naah, typical double-sheathed box with inside steel framing. The outside braces were an attempt to reinforce the ends and corners of the car.

David Thompson


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

David
 

Definitely unusual. It's a 3-compartment conversion of what was originally a single-dome Type V frameless tank car. Also appears to be lacking any safety valves for the domes.

David Thompson


"Seaboard" Vent for sale

Bill Lane
 

Someone on my S Scale list suggested I should sell the vent I designed for my Seaboard car in 2013. http://www.lanestrains.com/Seaboard_Express_Boxcar.htm Can’t believe it is 2 years ago already but anyway….

 

I said just I can print that!

 

So far I have printed the S Scale vent as shown in the photo http://www.lanestrains.com/Seaboard_Vent.jpg so I know the O Scale will work. I am not sure about printing the HO yet but I will try if I get interest.

 

For all scales vents are $10.00 each + $4.00 shipping via USPS without tracking and insurance. If you buy 6 or more, shipping is free. I can only ship on the weekends and do so in batches.

 

While I have the ability to print on need/demand I am considering this to be a “project” which for me means it is for sale NOW. I am not printing a bunch to be sold in 2 months from now as a stock item when someone gets around to buying it.

 

PayPal = bill@... Please send as a gift so I don’t have any fees.

 

Checks and MO to

305 Dubois Ave

West Deptford NJ 08096

 

Please send me an email with your intentions so I know what to look for.

 

 

Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy & PRSL in 1957 in S Scale since 1987

See my finished models at:
http://www.lanestrains.com
Look at what has been made in PRR in S Scale!

 

See my layout progress at:

http://www.lanestrains.com/My_Layout.htm

Custom Train Parts Design & 3D Printing
http://www.3dmodeltech.com

PRR Builders Photos Bought, Sold & Traded
(Trading is MUCH preferred)
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls 

***Join the PRR T&HS***
The other members are not ALL like me!
http://www.prrths.com
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf

Join the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Lines Historical Society
It's FREE to join! http://www.prslhs.com 
Preserving The Memory Of The PRSL

 


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Scott H. Haycock
 

Here is an unusual view of a three compartment tank car.



Scott Haycock



Re: Wood running boards

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks for this Ed.
 
I don’t suppose anyone happens to have a shot of (or other info on) the lateral running boards on an as-built NP car in the NP 16000-16999 series from May 1941?
 
Rob Kirkham
 

Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 9:02 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood running boards
 



On Feb 27, 2015, at 8:06 PM, Robert rdkirkham@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

I think my question leads to another: for most of the models you run, do you replace the running board or use the one provided in the kit.  I guess the right answer is “Depends on the prototype”, but very often the photos one works from don’t show enough to judge.  To me this form of running board lateral walk seems unusual, so I think I will tend to replace or modify it (unless I have proto info).
 
Rob,
Regarding the question about 1937 AAR box cars with wood running boards and the HO-scale version supplied by Innovative Model Works/Red Caboose and InterMountain, I can verify at least 3 roads that used them (there may be others).
 
Southern Pacific 1937 AAR box cars in classes B-50-18 and B-50-19 (built in 1936-1937) had them. A good overhead view of one appears on page 264 of Tony’s book Southern Pacific Freight Cars Volume 4: Box Cars.
 
Southern’s 1937 AAR box cars built in 1937-1939, and B&O M-55 box cars built in 1940 also used this version. The B&O cars had roofs with depressed end panels, but the latitudinal boards appear to match the model.
 
The model companies followed the 1937 A.A.R. box car drawing published in the Car Builders’ Cyclopedia even though this running board version may not have been the most common with regard to the latitudinal boards. These models date to the early 1990s, and we now have many more resources (photos and prototype drawings) available to use.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

Cyril

I believe the steel underframe tank car goes back to 1893.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: 28 February 2015 18:57
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital
Library

This model is very different from the car shown in the photo. This model
looks to be a flat car that has had a tank placed on it. This was not done
very often and the few times this approach was used it was with narrow gauge
cars or in some cases for cars used in maintenance service. Most early tank
cars had an underframe that was different from the ones used on flat cars.
Another point to make is that after 1904 tank cars were built with steel
underframes.

Cyril Durrenberger
--------------------------------------------


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

Scott H. Haycock
 

Here's another interesting early boxcar. The caption says Single sheathed-???

http://kdl.kyvl.org/catalog/xt7sf7664q86_6041_1





Scott Haycock


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

Tony Thompson
 

Tom Casey wrote:

 
Makes perfect sense if the idea is that most freight car designs seem to have evolved from a basic flat car.   

     Well, you are right, flat cars certainly could have been an origin for almost anything. But note in the tank car we are discussing that the tank sits down below the pair of center sills, lowering its center of gravity. No flat car is like that. That design, incidentally, had a flaw in that the attachment of draft gear to widely separated center sills was a point of weakness. Later tank cars no longer were built this way.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Cyril Durrenberger
 

This model is very different from the car shown in the photo. This model looks to be a flat car that has had a tank placed on it. This was not done very often and the few times this approach was used it was with narrow gauge cars or in some cases for cars used in maintenance service. Most early tank cars had an underframe that was different from the ones used on flat cars. Another point to make is that after 1904 tank cars were built with steel underframes.

Cyril Durrenberger
--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 2/27/15, 'Claus Schlund HGM' claus@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library
To: STMFC@...
Date: Friday, February 27, 2015, 11:33 PM


 












Hi List
Members,
 
In N scale, Fine N Scale
Products makes a cast
resin kit for a car of similar era and
construction.
 
See image
below.
 
http://www.finenscale.com/images/2103_2104Tankcar.jpg
 
  -  Claus
Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----

From:
'Schuyler Larrabee'
schuyler.larrabee@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC@...

Sent: Friday,
February 27, 2015 8:30
PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC]
Re: Digital Images -
University of Kentucky's Digital Library



LaBelle makes (or made) a
model of what could well be this specific car.  I built
it longer ago
than I want to think about, as a teenager.  Still have
it, too.  It
may have straight-pin Kadees on it, and IIRC, pizza cutter
wheels.  Hard
not to break off the railings.  I should dig that car out
. .
.
 
Schuyler
 



Subject:
Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of
Kentucky’s Digital
Library
 
 





Scott Haycock
wrote:




 


Here's an
interesting tank car. The photo is undated.
Does anyone know about these cars?


http://kdl.kyvl.org/catalog/xt7sf7664q86_5953_1

 

    Many tank cars
around the end of the 19th
century had side walkways like this. See any historical
collection.
 




Tony Thompson  
          Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley,
CA

2906 Forest Ave.,
Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538;
fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...

Publishers of
books on railroad history


 
 
 













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Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

tyesac@...
 

Makes perfect sense if the idea is that most freight car designs seem to have evolved from a basic flat car.   I also just happened to notice that there isn't a single tie plate to be seen.
 
Tom Casey
Scott Haycock wrote:

 
Here's an interesting tank car. The photo is undated. Does anyone know about these cars?

    Many tank cars around the end of the 19th century had side walkways like this. See any historical collection.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.s ignaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] To: STMFC
Sent: Fri, Feb 27, 2015 9:45 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

 
Scott Haycock wrote:

 
Here's an interesting tank car. The photo is undated. Does anyone know about these cars?

    Many tank cars around the end of the 19th century had side walkways like this. See any historical collection.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.s ignaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi List Members,
 
In N scale, Fine N Scale Products makes a cast resin kit for a car of similar era and construction.
 
See image below.
 
 
  -  Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 8:30 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

LaBelle makes (or made) a model of what could well be this specific car.  I built it longer ago than I want to think about, as a teenager.  Still have it, too.  It may have straight-pin Kadees on it, and IIRC, pizza cutter wheels.  Hard not to break off the railings.  I should dig that car out . . .

 

Schuyler

 


Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

 

 

Scott Haycock wrote:



 

Here's an interesting tank car. The photo is undated. Does anyone know about these cars?

 

    Many tank cars around the end of the 19th century had side walkways like this. See any historical collection.

 

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...

Publishers of books on railroad history

 

 

 


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

Cyril Durrenberger
 

This is a common design used by the Union Tank Line from the 1880's until the after 1910. There were other tank cars built with a similar design, but with differences in details such as truss rods, walks, saddles, head blocks and other items. These are for cars that are earlier than the era of most interest to members of this list. The LaBelle kit is a simplistic model of these cars, but Silver Crash Car Works offered a good model of these cars in two versions. The lettering schemes offered with the LaBelle kit were used, but were put on cars that do not match the model. The lettering schemes offered with the SCCW kit are accurate and are based on photos of these cars. There are plans for these UTL cars in early editions of the Car Builders Cyclopedia and similar references.

Cyril Durrenberger
--------------------------------------------

On Fri, 2/27/15, 'Scott H. Haycock ' shhaycock@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library
To: "Steam Era Freight Cars" <STMFC@...>
Date: Friday, February 27, 2015, 9:40 PM


 









Here's an
interesting tank car. The photo is undated. Does anyone know
about these cars?

http://kdl.kyvl.org/catalog/xt7sf7664q86_5953_1


Scott
Haycock












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Re: Wood running boards

Ed Hawkins
 


On Feb 27, 2015, at 8:06 PM, Robert rdkirkham@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

I think my question leads to another: for most of the models you run, do you replace the running board or use the one provided in the kit.  I guess the right answer is “Depends on the prototype”, but very often the photos one works from don’t show enough to judge.  To me this form of running board lateral walk seems unusual, so I think I will tend to replace or modify it (unless I have proto info).

Rob,
Regarding the question about 1937 AAR box cars with wood running boards and the HO-scale version supplied by Innovative Model Works/Red Caboose and InterMountain, I can verify at least 3 roads that used them (there may be others).

Southern Pacific 1937 AAR box cars in classes B-50-18 and B-50-19 (built in 1936-1937) had them. A good overhead view of one appears on page 264 of Tony’s book Southern Pacific Freight Cars Volume 4: Box Cars. 

Southern’s 1937 AAR box cars built in 1937-1939, and B&O M-55 box cars built in 1940 also used this version. The B&O cars had roofs with depressed end panels, but the latitudinal boards appear to match the model. 

The model companies followed the 1937 A.A.R. box car drawing published in the Car Builders’ Cyclopedia even though this running board version may not have been the most common with regard to the latitudinal boards. These models date to the early 1990s, and we now have many more resources (photos and prototype drawings) available to use. 
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Schuyler Larrabee
 

LaBelle makes (or made) a model of what could well be this specific car.  I built it longer ago than I want to think about, as a teenager.  Still have it, too.  It may have straight-pin Kadees on it, and IIRC, pizza cutter wheels.  Hard not to break off the railings.  I should dig that car out . . .

 

Schuyler

 


Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

 

 

Scott Haycock wrote:



 

Here's an interesting tank car. The photo is undated. Does anyone know about these cars?

 

    Many tank cars around the end of the 19th century had side walkways like this. See any historical collection.

 

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...

Publishers of books on railroad history

 

 

 

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