Date   

Re: Wood running boards

Bill Welch
 

Exactly. Thank you Guy!

Bill Welch


Re: Wood running boards

Pierre Oliver
 

Great! So laterals are out?
Just when I'd finally trained myself not to use the term endwalks. :-(
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 2/28/2015 11:41 AM, Guy Wilber guycwilber@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Rob Wrote:

"What was Frank’s rationale for preferring that term Bill?"

Frank's rationale for the term would be the fact that "latitudinal" is the choice of nomenclature on every official MCBA, ARA and AAR plate covering this portion of running boards applied to house cars.

The same is present within the Associations' discussion thereof or printed documentation of official letter ballots, circulars, text, etc.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada



Re: Wood running boards

Guy Wilber
 

Rob Wrote:

"What was Frank’s rationale for preferring that term Bill?"

Frank's rationale for the term would be the fact that "latitudinal" is the choice of nomenclature on every official MCBA, ARA and AAR plate covering this portion of running boards applied to house cars.

The same is present within the Associations' discussion thereof or printed documentation of official letter ballots, circulars, text, etc.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

gary laakso
 

Is that why it has so many handrail stanchions? It appears to be 10 on the visible side.
 
gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
 

Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 8:46 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library
 
 

Yes.  In the 1930’s UTLX experimented with converting older Type V tank cars into what was, essentially, a covered hopper car.  Note that there is a letter H on the end of the car, where their tank cars were marked as X or X-3, etc. The lack of center sills on the Van Dyke tank cars allowed them to presage the “Center Flow” cars by nearly 30 years.

The safety valves have been removed and a circular plate riveted over their location on the domes.

Actually a very cool find, there were not that many of these experimental cars.  So, an in-service shot is very interesting.

Regards,

Steve Hile


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 6:55 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

 

On 2015-02-28, at 6:53 AM, jaydeet2001@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Definitely unusual. It's a 3-compartment conversion of what was originally a single-dome Type V frameless tank car. Also appears to be lacking any safety valves for the domes.

Actually, if you have a closer look you'll notice a hatch on the top of the tank body at the near end.  It turns out that UTLX 81014 is a tank car that has had a second conversion, this time to an AAR type "LT", which is a tank style car for handling dry commodities.  That's why there are no safety valves on the domes.


Re: Wood running boards

Robert kirkham
 

What was Frank’s rationale for preferring that term Bill?
 
Rob Kirkham
 

Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 6:48 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood running boards
 


Since there has been some discussion as to the correct terminology of the wood and steel things on top of some freight cars, I would like to underscore Ed's use of the term "latitudinal" in reference to those components of the running board system that are perpendicular to the boards that ran the length of a boxcar. Years ago a freight car historian I trust, Frank Peacock educated me about the correct name "latitudinal" for these parts.

Bill Welch


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Besides the UTLX hopper car, there are several other interesting cars in this photo, including another early style covered hopper, an MDT reefer and an PFE car with the enameled metal SP medallion.

 

Be sure to zoom in and move around.

 

Steve Hile

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 1:33 AM
To: Steam Era Freight Cars
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

 

 

Here is an unusual view of a three compartment tank car.

 

 

 

Scott Haycock

 

 


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Cyril Durrenberger
 

My point was that after 1904 all tank cars were built with steel underframes. Clearly some tank cars with steel underframes were built before that time.

Cyril Durrenberger
--------------------------------------------

On Sat, 2/28/15, 'Rupert & Maureen' gamlenz@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library
To: STMFC@...
Date: Saturday, February 28, 2015, 12:49 AM


 









Cyril



I believe the steel underframe tank car goes back to
1893.



Rupert Gamlen

Auckland NZ



-----Original Message-----

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]


Sent: 28 February 2015 18:57

To: STMFC@...

Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of
Kentucky's Digital

Library



This model is very different from the car shown in the
photo. This model

looks to be a flat car that has had a tank placed on it.
This was not done

very often and the few times this approach was used it was
with narrow gauge

cars or in some cases for cars used in maintenance service.
Most early tank

cars had an underframe that was different from the ones used
on flat cars.

Another point to make is that after 1904 tank cars were
built with steel

underframes.



Cyril Durrenberger

--------------------------------------------













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Re: Wood running boards

Bill Welch
 

Since there has been some discussion as to the correct terminology of the wood and steel things on top of some freight cars, I would like to underscore Ed's use of the term "latitudinal" in reference to those components of the running board system that are perpendicular to the boards that ran the length of a boxcar. Years ago a freight car historian I trust, Frank Peacock educated me about the correct name "latitudinal" for these parts.

Bill Welch


X type Tank Cars

Gary Wildung
 

Any information on when the X type tank cars are to be made in HO?
Thanks Gary 


Re: Silver Crash Car Works -University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 2/28/2015 6:54 AM, wlhoss@... [STMFC] wrote:
�

In a message dated 2/27/2015 11:19:05 P.M. Central Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:
snip ...... but Silver Crash Car Works offered a good model of these cars in two versions.
�
I've been trying for several weeks to access the Silver Crash Car Works web site and can't.� Is it just me or is the site down.�
�

It's temporarily down. There internet provider folded and they are seeking another one.

Spen Kellogg


Silver Crash Car Works -University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

wlhoss@...
 

In a message dated 2/27/2015 11:19:05 P.M. Central Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:
snip ...... but Silver Crash Car Works offered a good model of these cars in two versions.
 
I've been trying for several weeks to access the Silver Crash Car Works web site and can't.  Is it just me or is the site down. 
 
Bill Hoss


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Yes.  In the 1930’s UTLX experimented with converting older Type V tank cars into what was, essentially, a covered hopper car.  Note that there is a letter H on the end of the car, where their tank cars were marked as X or X-3, etc. The lack of center sills on the Van Dyke tank cars allowed them to presage the “Center Flow” cars by nearly 30 years.

 

The safety valves have been removed and a circular plate riveted over their location on the domes.

 

Actually a very cool find, there were not that many of these experimental cars.  So, an in-service shot is very interesting.

 

Regards,

Steve Hile

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Saturday, February 28, 2015 6:55 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

 

 

On 2015-02-28, at 6:53 AM, jaydeet2001@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Definitely unusual. It's a 3-compartment conversion of what was originally a single-dome Type V frameless tank car. Also appears to be lacking any safety valves for the domes.

Actually, if you have a closer look you'll notice a hatch on the top of the tank body at the near end.  It turns out that UTLX 81014 is a tank car that has had a second conversion, this time to an AAR type "LT", which is a tank style car for handling dry commodities.  That's why there are no safety valves on the domes.

 


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Ian Cranstone
 

On 2015-02-28, at 6:53 AM, jaydeet2001@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

Definitely unusual. It's a 3-compartment conversion of what was originally a single-dome Type V frameless tank car. Also appears to be lacking any safety valves for the domes.

Actually, if you have a closer look you'll notice a hatch on the top of the tank body at the near end.  It turns out that UTLX 81014 is a tank car that has had a second conversion, this time to an AAR type "LT", which is a tank style car for handling dry commodities.  That's why there are no safety valves on the domes.


Re: Digital Images - Univ ersity of Kentucky’s Digital Library

David
 

Naah, typical double-sheathed box with inside steel framing. The outside braces were an attempt to reinforce the ends and corners of the car.

David Thompson


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

David
 

Definitely unusual. It's a 3-compartment conversion of what was originally a single-dome Type V frameless tank car. Also appears to be lacking any safety valves for the domes.

David Thompson


"Seaboard" Vent for sale

Bill Lane
 

Someone on my S Scale list suggested I should sell the vent I designed for my Seaboard car in 2013. http://www.lanestrains.com/Seaboard_Express_Boxcar.htm Can’t believe it is 2 years ago already but anyway….

 

I said just I can print that!

 

So far I have printed the S Scale vent as shown in the photo http://www.lanestrains.com/Seaboard_Vent.jpg so I know the O Scale will work. I am not sure about printing the HO yet but I will try if I get interest.

 

For all scales vents are $10.00 each + $4.00 shipping via USPS without tracking and insurance. If you buy 6 or more, shipping is free. I can only ship on the weekends and do so in batches.

 

While I have the ability to print on need/demand I am considering this to be a “project” which for me means it is for sale NOW. I am not printing a bunch to be sold in 2 months from now as a stock item when someone gets around to buying it.

 

PayPal = bill@... Please send as a gift so I don’t have any fees.

 

Checks and MO to

305 Dubois Ave

West Deptford NJ 08096

 

Please send me an email with your intentions so I know what to look for.

 

 

Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy & PRSL in 1957 in S Scale since 1987

See my finished models at:
http://www.lanestrains.com
Look at what has been made in PRR in S Scale!

 

See my layout progress at:

http://www.lanestrains.com/My_Layout.htm

Custom Train Parts Design & 3D Printing
http://www.3dmodeltech.com

PRR Builders Photos Bought, Sold & Traded
(Trading is MUCH preferred)
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls 

***Join the PRR T&HS***
The other members are not ALL like me!
http://www.prrths.com
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf

Join the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Lines Historical Society
It's FREE to join! http://www.prslhs.com 
Preserving The Memory Of The PRSL

 


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Scott H. Haycock
 

Here is an unusual view of a three compartment tank car.



Scott Haycock



Re: Wood running boards

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks for this Ed.
 
I don’t suppose anyone happens to have a shot of (or other info on) the lateral running boards on an as-built NP car in the NP 16000-16999 series from May 1941?
 
Rob Kirkham
 

Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 9:02 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Wood running boards
 



On Feb 27, 2015, at 8:06 PM, Robert rdkirkham@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

I think my question leads to another: for most of the models you run, do you replace the running board or use the one provided in the kit.  I guess the right answer is “Depends on the prototype”, but very often the photos one works from don’t show enough to judge.  To me this form of running board lateral walk seems unusual, so I think I will tend to replace or modify it (unless I have proto info).
 
Rob,
Regarding the question about 1937 AAR box cars with wood running boards and the HO-scale version supplied by Innovative Model Works/Red Caboose and InterMountain, I can verify at least 3 roads that used them (there may be others).
 
Southern Pacific 1937 AAR box cars in classes B-50-18 and B-50-19 (built in 1936-1937) had them. A good overhead view of one appears on page 264 of Tony’s book Southern Pacific Freight Cars Volume 4: Box Cars.
 
Southern’s 1937 AAR box cars built in 1937-1939, and B&O M-55 box cars built in 1940 also used this version. The B&O cars had roofs with depressed end panels, but the latitudinal boards appear to match the model.
 
The model companies followed the 1937 A.A.R. box car drawing published in the Car Builders’ Cyclopedia even though this running board version may not have been the most common with regard to the latitudinal boards. These models date to the early 1990s, and we now have many more resources (photos and prototype drawings) available to use.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital Library

Rupert & Maureen <gamlenz@...>
 

Cyril

I believe the steel underframe tank car goes back to 1893.

Rupert Gamlen
Auckland NZ

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: 28 February 2015 18:57
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky's Digital
Library

This model is very different from the car shown in the photo. This model
looks to be a flat car that has had a tank placed on it. This was not done
very often and the few times this approach was used it was with narrow gauge
cars or in some cases for cars used in maintenance service. Most early tank
cars had an underframe that was different from the ones used on flat cars.
Another point to make is that after 1904 tank cars were built with steel
underframes.

Cyril Durrenberger
--------------------------------------------


Re: Digital Images - University of Kentucky’s Digital Library

Scott H. Haycock
 

Here's another interesting early boxcar. The caption says Single sheathed-???

http://kdl.kyvl.org/catalog/xt7sf7664q86_6041_1





Scott Haycock