Date   

Looking Back: SFRD In 1909

thecitrusbelt@...
 

This material is extracted from an article in the Santa Fe EMPLOYEES MAGAZINE, Volume 3, No. 12 (November 1909). In those days SFRD stood for Santa Fe Refrigerator Despatch. The article is titled “Growth Of The Citrus Fruit Traffic” by Edward Chambers, Assistant Freight Traffic Manager, San Francisco.

 

I extracted the material that pertains to the merits of early refrigerator cars.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

+++++

 

Up to this time [1885] California shipped but little citrus fruit to points east of the Rocky Mountains. The cars used were ordinary box cars or ventilated fruit cars of antiquated pattern, lined inside and provided with ventilators at each end, so constructed as to admit the greatest quantity of fresh air during warm weather or to be tightly closed during cold weather. Both the fruit cars and the box cars were thirty to thirty-four feet in length and weighed, when empty, much less than a refrigerator car, which was then unknown in California. These older cars were, however, more available for general service than the modern refrigerator car, and were usually loaded returning to California, as westbound traffic then at all seasons was very much greater than eastbound. This equipment was really of no special value in preserving fruit against damage except in supplying fresh air from the outside and allowing the escape of warm air from the inside. In the winter season scarcely a car of fruit reached an eastern destination without being more or less frozen.

 

Early in 1888 ventilated refrigerator cars were introduced into California for carrying citrus fruits, both under ventilation and refrigeration. The first cars in service on the Santa Fe were known as the "Tiffany patent," equipped with solid end ice tanks having a capacity of about four thousand pounds of ice. Ventilation was secured through small ventilators in the ends of the cars.

 

Two types were put in service on the Southern Pacific Company's lines—the Hutchins car (operated by the California Fruit Transportation Company) and the Goodell Line car.

 

At the end of the second season thereafter the Santa Fe put into service the Wickes patent refrigerator car, which had been found by test to be a better refrigerator and ventilator than the Tiffany car. These cars were thirty-four feet in length. After using them and finding they were the best in service, shippers via the Santa Fe absolutely declined to load any other cars, and the road was forced to take out of service two hundred and fifty Tiffany cars and rebuild them for ventilated fruit cars. Such cars were less used, even then, and within a short time the ventilated cars were entirely withdrawn from the citrus fruit service, at quite a loss to the railroad company.

 

In the meantime all kinds of refrigerator cars were coming into service. Improvements continued in ventilating and refrigerating devices for refrigerator cars—nearly four hundred patents have been taken out in this country alone—and the construction of the cars advanced particularly as to strength, height and length.

 

By the beginning of the season of 1896 the Wickes car was out of date compared with others, and the Santa Fe was obliged, in order to satisfy the demand of the shippers and be on an equality with competing railroads, to discard it.

 

Arrangements were made with the Santa Fe Fruit and Refrigerator Line, the Continental Fruit Express and the Fruit Growers' Express to supply the line with sufficient of the latest improved refrigerator cars. These car lines were not satisfactory to the shippers, and in 1901 the Santa Fe purchased all the modern cars of the Santa Fe Fruit and Refrigerator Line and built a sufficient number of modern forty-foot refrigerator cars to take care of the traffic.

 

This equipment has been steadily improved upon and increased so that today the Santa Fe has six thousand of the latest improved refrigerator cars, operated by the Santa Fe Refrigerator Despatch. This equipment cost over six millions of dollars and is sufficient to take care of the maximum citrus fruit loading at any part of the season.

 

This immense investment has been made primarily for the citrus fruit traffic, as there is not sufficient perishable freight on other parts of the system to employ any such number of cars during the dull season in California. The cars are then either idle during several months or are employed in box car service, where the general loading and usage necessitates heavy cleaning and repair bills.

 

 



Re: Greetings, a new guy.

mwbauers
 

Thank you Bruce, and the rest of you guys...........

This is part of the continuing build-up to going photo-real modeling with enhanced blow-ups of the Red Ball card side catalog pages. Catalog #9, date unknown. is ideal for this sort of thing. There are even a couple of 50' double door late era wooden sided cars there. [CNW and ATSF]

I have a few full HO car sides as well.

While its vintage modeling stock, I did get about 80 sets of decorated and embossed Tenshodo tin sides for HO steel cars a year or so ago. I hesitate to actually build with them. I do wish to try going photo-real with them and leaving the originals intact. I have some ways of doing the embossed rivet detail in the photo-real versions as well.

The goal is to scratch-build as many boxcars as possible using only a few critical purchased details like braking equipment. I'm by-passing the current model railroading unit costs of many model boxcars being around $40, as best as possible .

I do understand that additional tooling costs are involved here. But I like the idea of spending less on tooling than I would for the same number of boxcars and other car types.

I have a wallpaper screen of a four truck, drop bottom, heavy duty PHMX flatcar on this computer screen. As often as I see those monster cars on the property, I look at them with the eye of seeing how I could assemble model versions of those if I only had all of the segments and gussets of the cars cut out and ready to plastic-weld together. They are just a lot of combined steel plate with an interesting routing of the brake system.

More in line with this era modeling was the smaller drop bottom flat that used to be on the property that was littered with the angle-iron stubs and remaining plates of many years of tying down mining shovel sub-assemblies. I'm glad I got a slew of detail shots of that. It was either a cast car or a riveted constructed car, either would be an interesting model. Thankfully, I have the shots.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Mar 2, 2015, at 12:48 PM, 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Mike,


So, after all the bandwidth this weekend… terminology IS really important  

As has been noted, cars with wood sheathing but steel structures lasted beyond WWII in large numbers and so your answer is yes.


Re: Greetings, a new guy.

Mikebrock
 


Mike, as Steve, Charles and Bruce point out, ain't nothin' simple when it comes to frt cars.
 
Some RR's went to all steel sooner than others. And it wasn't because of a gvt mandate. Southern, for example, used their truss rod double sheathed SU series of box cars into the 50's. Wersterfield makes it. NP still had 4104 DS box cars in the 10000 series in 1956. Sunshine made it. They also made the St Louis Southwestern DS. [ 2000 cars in '53 ]. Fowler SS box cars were obtained by D&RGW, Rock Island and C&NW [ to name 3 RRs ]. Westerfield makes it. All ran into the late 50's and 60's. There were 45 Santa Fe BX-W truss rod box cars in service in '52. Westerfield makes it. So, as you can see, you have a lot of research to do.
 
Mike Brock


Re: Greetings, a new guy.

Bruce Smith
 

Mike,

So, after all the bandwidth this weekend… terminology IS really important <VBG>  

As has been noted, cars with wood sheathing but steel structures lasted beyond WWII in large numbers and so your answer is yes.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Mar 2, 2015, at 12:35 PM, Mike Bauers mwbauers55@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



By all-wood, I mean the double sheathed wooden upper bodies with steel under-frames.

Those came with double-sheath wooden ends, steel framed single sheath ends, or all steel ends.......... all on then contemporary steel under-framing.

Each version with a wooden roof, or a steel roof.........

My pondering is if the strong steel framed, yet wooden sided cars would have lasted long enough to be almost commonly seen in use after WW-II.


Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Mar 2, 2015, at 12:17 PM, 'Bruce F. Smith'  wrote:

Mike,


Single sheathed boxcars (aka “outside braced”) are certainly not “all wood”.  All wood boxcars were eliminated from interchange service prior to WW2.  This was due to the inability of the wood underframes to withstand the forces applied to them by heavier trains.

The next iteration would have been wooden superstructures with steel underframes.  These also lost favor in the years prior to WW2 and were mostly eliminated from interchange service prior to the start of WW2.  Refrigerator cars often had completely wooden superstructures as well.

The next iteration would be cars with steel superstructure and steel underframes with wood sheathing, such as the single sheathed car that you mention.  These began to be built prior to WW1 and lasted in service past the time frame of this list.  As for the MILW, they were likely not in interchange service at that time, but rather were in company service or MOW service.
.............




Re: Greetings, a new guy.

Charles Morrill
 

Stock cars with steel frames, wood sides, ends, and roofs lasted into the end of stock trains (late ‘60s at least).  Wood body box cars with steel center sills (NP, GN) lasted till the end of this forum time period.  Steel framed box cars with wood sides and ends (SP, RI, MILW, etc.) also were still in use post WW2.
Charlie
Sent: Monday, March 02, 2015 12:35 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Greetings, a new guy.
 


By all-wood, I mean the double sheathed wooden upper bodies with steel under-frames.
 
Those came with double-sheath wooden ends, steel framed single sheath ends, or all steel ends.......... all on then contemporary steel under-framing.
 
Each version with a wooden roof, or a steel roof.........
 
My pondering is if the strong steel framed, yet wooden sided cars would have lasted long enough to be almost commonly seen in use after WW-II.
 
 
Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi
 
On Mar 2, 2015, at 12:17 PM, 'Bruce F. Smith'  wrote:
 

Mike,

 
Single sheathed boxcars (aka “outside braced”) are certainly not “all wood”.  All wood boxcars were eliminated from interchange service prior to WW2.  This was due to the inability of the wood underframes to withstand the forces applied to them by heavier trains.
 
The next iteration would have been wooden superstructures with steel underframes.  These also lost favor in the years prior to WW2 and were mostly eliminated from interchange service prior to the start of WW2.  Refrigerator cars often had completely wooden superstructures as well.
 
The next iteration would be cars with steel superstructure and steel underframes with wood sheathing, such as the single sheathed car that you mention.  These began to be built prior to WW1 and lasted in service past the time frame of this list.  As for the MILW, they were likely not in interchange service at that time, but rather were in company service or MOW service.
.............


Atlatl LCL shipment, 1920

Ray Breyer
 


Re: Greetings, a new guy.

mwbauers
 

By all-wood, I mean the double sheathed wooden upper bodies with steel under-frames.

Those came with double-sheath wooden ends, steel framed single sheath ends, or all steel ends.......... all on then contemporary steel under-framing.

Each version with a wooden roof, or a steel roof.........

My pondering is if the strong steel framed, yet wooden sided cars would have lasted long enough to be almost commonly seen in use after WW-II.


Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Mar 2, 2015, at 12:17 PM, 'Bruce F. Smith'  wrote:

Mike,


Single sheathed boxcars (aka “outside braced”) are certainly not “all wood”.  All wood boxcars were eliminated from interchange service prior to WW2.  This was due to the inability of the wood underframes to withstand the forces applied to them by heavier trains.

The next iteration would have been wooden superstructures with steel underframes.  These also lost favor in the years prior to WW2 and were mostly eliminated from interchange service prior to the start of WW2.  Refrigerator cars often had completely wooden superstructures as well.

The next iteration would be cars with steel superstructure and steel underframes with wood sheathing, such as the single sheathed car that you mention.  These began to be built prior to WW1 and lasted in service past the time frame of this list.  As for the MILW, they were likely not in interchange service at that time, but rather were in company service or MOW service.
.............


Re: Greetings, a new guy.

Bruce Smith
 

Mike,

Single sheathed boxcars (aka “outside braced”) are certainly not “all wood”.  All wood boxcars were eliminated from interchange service prior to WW2.  This was due to the inability of the wood underframes to withstand the forces applied to them by heavier trains.

The next iteration would have been wooden superstructures with steel underframes.  These also lost favor in the years prior to WW2 and were mostly eliminated from interchange service prior to the start of WW2.  Refrigerator cars often had completely wooden superstructures as well.

The next iteration would be cars with steel superstructure and steel underframes with wood sheathing, such as the single sheathed car that you mention.  These began to be built prior to WW1 and lasted in service past the time frame of this list.  As for the MILW, they were likely not in interchange service at that time, but rather were in company service or MOW service.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Mar 2, 2015, at 12:00 PM, Mike Bauers mwbauers55@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

I'm a so-so modeler that is falling into lower cost modeling due to the economy.

I have a question about all-wood boxcars.

I remember seeing a couple of the older outside braced wooden boxcars on the side of the Milwaukee Road main shops for several years starting around 1970. So some wood cars survived years beyond the years this group is following.

My question is about when did the older all-wood boxcars get pulled off of the mainline?

I'd like to photo-real model several of the older all-wood boxcars in higher-tech card-stock, of sorts. I understand many of the surviving in service wood box cars would have metal ends and up to date metal under-frames.

I'm puzzled about when all wood body boxcars would be forced off of the Roads.

I'm unsure if circa 1952, wooden sided boxcars would still be somewhat common.

Does anyone have knowledge of mandated elimination dates for the all-wood box car bodies, or the wooden sided-only  boxcars ?

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi


Re: Greetings, a new guy.

Steve SANDIFER
 

In 1952 there would be a lot of single sheathed and double sheathed cars around. Most modelers of that time slot have too many all steel cars.  

 

Now your replied will start getting technical with details of steel underframes, steel ends vs. wood ends, truss rods, etc.  I'm going to lunch.

 

__________________________________________________

J. Stephen Sandifer

Minister Emeritus, Southwest Central Church of Christ

Webmaster, Santa Fe Railway Historical and Modeling Society

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 12:00 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Greetings, a new guy.

 

 

I'm a so-so modeler that is falling into lower cost modeling due to the economy.

I have a question about all-wood boxcars.

I remember seeing a couple of the older outside braced wooden boxcars on the side of the Milwaukee Road main shops for several years starting around 1970. So some wood cars survived years beyond the years this group is following.

My question is about when did the older all-wood boxcars get pulled off of the mainline?

I'd like to photo-real model several of the older all-wood boxcars in higher-tech card-stock, of sorts. I understand many of the surviving in service wood box cars would have metal ends and up to date metal under-frames.

I'm puzzled about when all wood body boxcars would be forced off of the Roads.

I'm unsure if circa 1952, wooden sided boxcars would still be somewhat common.

Does anyone have knowledge of mandated elimination dates for the all-wood box car bodies, or the wooden sided-only boxcars ?

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi


Greetings, a new guy.

mwbauers
 

I'm a so-so modeler that is falling into lower cost modeling due to the economy.

I have a question about all-wood boxcars.

I remember seeing a couple of the older outside braced wooden boxcars on the side of the Milwaukee Road main shops for several years starting around 1970. So some wood cars survived years beyond the years this group is following.

My question is about when did the older all-wood boxcars get pulled off of the mainline?

I'd like to photo-real model several of the older all-wood boxcars in higher-tech card-stock, of sorts. I understand many of the surviving in service wood box cars would have metal ends and up to date metal under-frames.

I'm puzzled about when all wood body boxcars would be forced off of the Roads.

I'm unsure if circa 1952, wooden sided boxcars would still be somewhat common.

Does anyone have knowledge of mandated elimination dates for the all-wood box car bodies, or the wooden sided-only boxcars ?

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi


Freight Car Terminology, diversion into track terminology

Jack Mullen
 

Paul Hillman said: 

Wonder what they were called when they were stub-type? (No points)

Same definitions apply: the part with movable rails is a switch. In this case it's a stub switch.  The whole thing, extending to or past the heel of frog, is a turnout.If you need to differentiate it from turnouts having other types of switches, you can call it a stub-switch turnout. 

The familiar type of switch having two tapered point rails is a split switch, but the term is usually used only when needed to distinguish from other types.

Jack Mullen



Re: Odd or Even Numbers Only for Rolling Stock?

reporterllc
 

Thanks Dennis. I note that on the Fort Wayne, Jackson & Saginaw and its successor the Fort Wayne & Jackson Railroad (the subject of my new book out this year) that platform cars and flat cars were even numbered only and all other cars including "mileage" box cars used in the lumber trade were even numbered.


My next question probably applies to a period much earlier than most of the interests of this group, but am I correct in that "platform cars"  were flats  that could be converted to hauling bulk commodities with the addition of stakes and side boards?


The Fort Wayne & Jackson became a "paper railroad" in 1882, leased over time to the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, New York Central and Penn Central. My book covers the time period from 1869 to present day.


If anyone knows of a source for photos of FWJ&S or FW&J freight or passenger cars, please let me know.


Victor A. Baird

http://www.erstwhilepublications.com




Re: [IllinoisCentral] IC 38400-38799 Composite Boxcars

Ray Breyer
 

Hi Jeff,
 
The cars were originally built in 7/1929 as 165000-165599, with 10' wide Youngstown doors (6' and 4'). They were changed to two 6' doors  VERY soon thereafter; the diagram book sheets say 2/1930. That's why the diagram PAGE shows a door and a half configuration.
 
By 1954, these cars were all over the map: 6' doors, 12' doors, 6' with the other door sealed, etc.
 
I'll send you a couple of photos off-group.
 
Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


From: "Jeffrey White jrwhite@... [illinoiscentral]"
To: illinois-central-model@...; illinoiscentral@...; "STMFC@..."
Sent: Monday, March 2, 2015 10:16 AM
Subject: [IllinoisCentral] IC 38400-38799 Composite Boxcars

Does anyone have a photo of these cars or know the actual door
configuration?

The car diagram for these cars states that the cars have 12 foot doors.
However the illustration shows a door and a half configuration.  I
suppose it's possible it was an 8 foot and 4 foot door, but I've never
seen that configuration before.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks

Jeff White
Alma, IL


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2015 Central Ohio RPM

seaboard_1966
 

The 2015 Central Ohio RPM is planned for April 23rd-25th at Marion Union Station, Marion, Ohio.


This meet follows the usual RPM practices of model displays, clinics, door prizes and fellowship.  Where we differ is that we hold the meet in a former Depot that is located within the intersection of 3 sets of double track mainlines.  2 of these sets are CSX while 1 is NS.


We have movie/slide shows each night of the meet and a meet closing cookout that is a GREAT time.


The festivities start on Thursday the 23rd around noon or so.  This is when be being setup.  After set up there is time for fanning in the area and then we gather for dinner at The Shovel, a local restaurant that is conveniently located right across the parking lot from the Marion Union Station.


After the dinner we will gather for our first of three slide/movie shows.


The fun really kicks off at 900AM on Friday and goes until 500PM when will adjourn for dinner.  They are plenty of choices within the local area  Around 7 or so we will gather for slides/movies again.


We have the same schedule on Saturday with door prizes being taken care of after lunch, around 1PM or so.  You must be present to claim your door prize. 


After the meet closes, around 5 pm or so, we have a tear down and cleanup session followed by an extra fare, $6.00, cookout.  Once the cookout out is complete we will have the last of our 3 slide/movie shows.  If you have movies/slides that you would like to share, please feel free to bring them along. We do have a digital projector and a lap top available for those that wish to present a digital presentation.


We are also looking for folks to present clinics.  Again, as I mentioned above, we do have the equipment for a digital presentation and actually prefer that they are presented digitally.  Clinicians get free admission to the meet.


Admission if $20.00 for the weekend and all proceeds, after expenses, go to the Marion Union Station Association. You can simply show up and The Warden, my wife, Robin Blake, will be able to handle registration at the door.


Please contact me, Denis Blake at dblake7@... for any more information. 


We hope to see you there.


Denis, Robin, JP and Kevin.


IC 38400-38799 Composite Boxcars

Jeffrey White
 

Does anyone have a photo of these cars or know the actual door configuration?

The car diagram for these cars states that the cars have 12 foot doors. However the illustration shows a door and a half configuration. I suppose it's possible it was an 8 foot and 4 foot door, but I've never seen that configuration before.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks

Jeff White
Alma, IL


Re: Odd or Even Numbers Only for Rolling Stock?

destorzek@...
 

It was an easy to check for misplaced cars. As an example, the Soo Line, which used the odd/even system for a good portion of the twentieth century, had two main businesses; grain, and iron ore. Boxcars were numbered with even numbers only, open top cars with odd numbers. If there was an even number in a track list of the ore yard, it was a good bet something was out of place.

Dennis Storzek


Odd or Even Numbers Only for Rolling Stock?

reporterllc
 

Why did some railroads number their cars (or some of them) in odd or even numbers only? What was the logic behind that?


Victor A. Baird

http://www.erstwhilepublications.com


Re: ADMIN: Freight Car Terminology

Mikebrock
 

Schuyler Larrabee says in response to my:

"And, we aren't too far from arguing about the [ OHMYGOSH! ] lack of a defined distance from the point of a frog to the point [ or even the dreaded 1/2" ] where the closure rail becomes a wing rail..."

Note that I said we were not far from...

Rest assured that I won't need to change the subject line because we won't be discussing the infamous missing measurement here.

And, for those who have attempted to name every stream locomotive ever built, the thread on steam loco names is now TERMINATED. BTW, I was only pointing out in my comment regarding UP 4-8-4's that the names of certain RR subjects might differ from RR to RR.

Last, I don't find that the thread name RR terminology is incorrect when the message contains information on...uh...RR terminology.

Mike Brock


Re: ADMIN: Freight Car Terminology

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Mike Brock notes:



And, we aren't too far from arguing about the [ OHMYGOSH! ] lack of a defined distance from the point of a frog to the point [ or even the dreaded 1/2" ] where the closure rail becomes a wing rail...



Mike Brock



Argue away, Mike, but PLEASE change the subject line . . .



Schuyler









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Latitudinals

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Rob,

 

The only “book” I am referring to is Vol. 16 of the Railroad Prototype Cyclopedia.

 

And that reminds me of what I intended to append to my last post.  This group owes a tremendous debt to Ed Hawkins and Pat Wider, for their continued efforts to provide definitive and pretty exhaustive (and probably exhausting) research and readable documentation of what we’re all interested in here.  Steam era Freight Cars.

 

Thank you, Ed and Pat.

 

Schuyler

 


Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Latitudinals

 

 

Eave!  - thanks Schuyler. 

 

You appear to have referred to a book in paragraph 2.   Which book?

 

I appreciate your comments on the spotting features.  Didn’t previously have awareness of the variety of LATITUDINAL running boards. 

 

Rob Kirkham 

 

Sent: Sunday, March 1, 2015 5:29 PM

Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Latitudinals

 




It’s hard not to agree with Jack’s opinion expressed in his self-categorized “rant.”  But that’s the term of art in the steam era.

 

But Jack’s right about the third style, using z-shapes on the edges of the latitudinals.  The spotting feature for these would be, based on the UP example (B-50-34 and -35 classes, built by Pullman Standard, 1938) would be that there is nothing reaching over the eave (not eve).  The ends of the z-shape is flattened and welded (it appears) to the roof’s surface.  The grab supports are bolted to the upper surface of the z-shapes.  Based on a good hard squint at the photo on page 67, I’d say the IM version is still wanting, as it appears that the upper flat of the z-shape and the boards are flush; the boards are not standing proud of the steel.

 

The other two styles have the straps reaching over the edge of the roof proper down onto the eave construction  Interestingly, it appears not uncommon for the straps to be fastened to a small plate or angle which extends upward a few inches to serve as the connection for the flat bar.  In other cases, the flat is riveted directly to the vertical face of the roof panels.

 

To tell the channel variety apart from the strap version, I think (not based on Really Looking at Photos) that you may well see some bolts (lengthwise to the car) at the eave end of the channel style, connecting the channel to a strap or tab, perhaps, that reaches up and over the edge of the roof, similarly to the plate or angle mentioned in the last paragraph.  The channel would indeed mask the ends of the boards, if you can see that side, so it would appear smooth

 

Take note, however, that the appearance of a smooth side to the latitudinals COULD suggest that the running board is steel.  Several of the steel versions have an edge folded down that is smooth, and could mimic the appearance of the channel edge construction.  A give-away could be the presence of a nut at the end of a rod around the midpoint of a channel side wood latitudinal, whereas the steel versions have no such nut.

 

Schuyler.

 


Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Latitudinals

 

I agree with your last comment Jack.

 

With the work I’m doing on an NP 1937 AAR car, I got thinking about spotting features for low angle shots.  Thanks to Ed Hawkins I have solid information for modelling the car.  But I know I won’t always get so lucky with clear data.  So was trying to make sense of some of what has been discussed here.  Does this make sense: 

 

Is it the case that latitudinal running boards supported by channel or Z section stock will have a straight solid edge if viewed from the car end or other angle; Conversely will those with boards bolted to steel strapping beneath have the notched look of individual, spaced boards.   Seems like an obvious inference to me.

 

Where the angle of the photo doesn’t allow that perspective, can we infer anything from the way the supports mount to the car roof or eve?  For example, is it the case that those designs using channel or Z profile supports ran from the longitudinal running boards down at a steeper angle than the roof slope, to touch the car roof near the eve?  In contrast, is it typically the case that latitudinal running boards mounted on strap steel were aligned on a plane approximately parallel to the slope of the roof, and the steel straps curved over the eve to mount in a more vertical plane?   Would the attachment method and “parallel” or “not parallel” slope be useful spotting features?

 

Rob Kirkham 

 

Subject: [STMFC] Re: Latitudinals


There's a third fairly common lat. running board support, which is shown on p.67 of RPC16. The supports are steel pressed into a Z section, with the boards bolted to the lower horizontal flange. This seems to be the type that Intermountain  modeled on its O scale AAR 1937 boxcar. This detail was poorly rendered, one of the few lapses on this model, which raised the bar for fine detail in a plastic model several decades ago.

 

Absent a good photo looking down at the roof, the type of support for the lat. can often be identified from its end in a good view of the car side.

 

Jack Mullen

 

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