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Re: More Freight Car Content in March MRH

David
 

1934 is an interesting date to model. Almost nothing had been built in the few years previous, so the freight car fleet was almost entirely cars built 1900-1930 or so. The older wood-frame truss-rod cars would have been worn out and mostly junked by then, and the massive scrapping of the early steel and steel-frame cars was just beginning. To oversimplify, you need at least one of almost everything in the Westerfield catalog.

David Thompson


Re: More Freight Car Content in March MRH

rob.mclear3@...
 

Hi all

Tony's article is one of the better ones that I have read recently and I know it is for the 50's but I model 1947 so it is not that far ahead of my time frame and should be reasonably applicable to it.   Thanks for this one Tony a good read.   I'm sure Richard is smiling.

Regards
Rob McLear
Australia.


Re: Terminology - Steam Locomotive

Doug Pillow
 

C&O also called Berkshires Kanawhas C&O considered itself a Southern road in those days headquarters in Richmond Va. ,no Yankee names allowed


Psassenger train or frt train?

Mikebrock
 

Armand Premo...apparently homesick for the snows of Kilamen...ooops, Vermont...writes:

"Tom, Were Big Boys used in passenger sevice?"

Actually, yes...if you consider a "main train" [ otherwise known as a troop train ] to be a passenger train. I guess I have defined a passenger train to be a train carrying passengers. I suppose there might be some debate regarding the reason a person might be on a train...by order or by desire...who knows?

Mike Brock


it's all paper

Schuyler Larrabee
 

When I wrote last night, speculating what Mike Bauers was talking about with his “photo-real modeling,” I mentioned a web page with all modeling done with paper.  It took me a while to find this, but take a look at these images:

 

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=42297

 

Schuyler


Re: Mike's article

Armand Premo
 


Tom,Were Big Boys used in passenger sevice? Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 10:37 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Mike's article

 

Another thought...


Clark, look at it this way. Suppose you found out the quiet, dull and uninteresting guy in the next office was dating Scarlett Johansson. (If you don't know who she is, insert the name of your favorite glamorous movie star here.) You'd certainly view him in a new light, and have a lot more respect for him. Mike's interest in passenger trains makes him a much more interesting and (dare I say it?) respectable person.


Whether Mike views the parade of yellow and gray (or gray and gray, or green) passenger and mail trains over Sherman Hill as a hindrance to the real purpose of the railroad or vice versa is beside the point - his interest in both freight and passenger equipment and operations elevates him. He might even impress Scarlett Johansson with his Big Boy.


Tom Madden

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Re: Mike's article

Tom Madden
 

Another thought...


Clark, look at it this way. Suppose you found out the quiet, dull and uninteresting guy in the next office was dating Scarlett Johansson. (If you don't know who she is, insert the name of your favorite glamorous movie star here.) You'd certainly view him in a new light, and have a lot more respect for him. Mike's interest in passenger trains makes him a much more interesting and (dare I say it?) respectable person.


Whether Mike views the parade of yellow and gray (or gray and gray, or green) passenger and mail trains over Sherman Hill as a hindrance to the real purpose of the railroad or vice versa is beside the point - his interest in both freight and passenger equipment and operations elevates him. He might even impress Scarlett Johansson with his Big Boy.


Tom Madden


Re: WESTERFIELD MODELS NEWSLETTER, VOL 4, NO 1, MARCH 2015

paul.doggett2472 <paul.doggett2472@...>
 

SP F50-4 would be very welcome


Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile

"Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

gary laakso wrote:

 
The Harriman flat cars will sell very well from all the expressions of interest from UP and ESPEE modelers.

      These are the early Harriman cars, with mildly fishbelly side sills of pressed steel, classes F-50-1 to -3. Though they lasted MANY years in MOW service, they were largely out of revenue service by World War II. What many SP and UP modelers have been clamoring for is the straight-side-sill cars, F-50-4 and thereafter, which were in revenue service well through the transition era. I believe those are also under study at Westerfield.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Mike's article

Bill Schneider
 

…just don’t call it the “Fast Mail”…



Heading for jail…



Bill Schneider



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, March 3, 2015 7:14 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Mike's article





Clark Propst writes:

"At last night’s ops I had a chance to thumb through the latest RMC. I was
anxious to see Mike Brock’s article. Wow, was I surprised! It was about a
passenger train!!!...A passenger train!!!! I spun the magazine around so the
others could see and said “This guy owns the Steam Freight Car Yahoo group.”
The answers were all the same “So why is he writing about a passenger
train?” "

Hmmm. Believe it or not, I am wordless...but only for a few seconds. First,
as was pointed out, I am the "owner" of the STMFC. As such, I ruled several
yrs ago that a mail train could be considered to be a frt train...since as I
noted, it can and did haul freight. More so, in fact, than passengers.
Second, I do...from time to time...write about other aspects of RR's...even
regarding steam locomotives. So, I don't just confine myself to frt cars.

Anyhow, mail trains are among the more interesting types of trains no matter
what group of trains they fall into. So, there.

Mike Brock


Re: Mike's article

Armand Premo
 


Hey Mike,How about Milk Trains? Armand Premo----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 03, 2015 7:13 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Mike's article

 

Clark Propst writes:

"At last night’s ops I had a chance to thumb through the latest RMC. I was
anxious to see Mike Brock’s article. Wow, was I surprised! It was about a
passenger train!!!...A passenger train!!!! I spun the magazine around so the
others could see and said “This guy owns the Steam Freight Car Yahoo group.”
The answers were all the same “So why is he writing about a passenger
train?” "

Hmmm. Believe it or not, I am wordless...but only for a few seconds. First,
as was pointed out, I am the "owner" of the STMFC. As such, I ruled several
yrs ago that a mail train could be considered to be a frt train...since as I
noted, it can and did haul freight. More so, in fact, than passengers.
Second, I do...from time to time...write about other aspects of RR's...even
regarding steam locomotives. So, I don't just confine myself to frt cars.

Anyhow, mail trains are among the more interesting types of trains no matter
what group of trains they fall into. So, there.

Mike Brock

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Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4765 / Virus Database: 4257/9217 - Release Date: 03/03/15


Re: Mike's article

Mikebrock
 

Clark Propst writes:

"At last night’s ops I had a chance to thumb through the latest RMC. I was anxious to see Mike Brock’s article. Wow, was I surprised! It was about a passenger train!!!...A passenger train!!!! I spun the magazine around so the others could see and said “This guy owns the Steam Freight Car Yahoo group.” The answers were all the same “So why is he writing about a passenger train?” "

Hmmm. Believe it or not, I am wordless...but only for a few seconds. First, as was pointed out, I am the "owner" of the STMFC. As such, I ruled several yrs ago that a mail train could be considered to be a frt train...since as I noted, it can and did haul freight. More so, in fact, than passengers. Second, I do...from time to time...write about other aspects of RR's...even regarding steam locomotives. So, I don't just confine myself to frt cars.

Anyhow, mail trains are among the more interesting types of trains no matter what group of trains they fall into. So, there.

Mike Brock


Re: More Freight Car Content in March MRH

Tony Thompson
 

David Bott wrote:

 
I read it and enjoyed it. I just wish it had pointed out that it was focused on a peri-WWII or later fleet. For example, the signature Southern cars were the 1937 steel boxcar and an even later car. This might have the broadest appeal, given the numbers of transition modelers, but does me no good for my 1934 modeling effort . . .

 This kind of article can really only be done for a fairly narrow slice of years. The data shown in Figure 1 are for 1950, which SHOULD have supplied some clue about the approximate era being covered. Nothing whatever wrong with 1934, it's just that I happen to model 1953, and that's what I have researched, modeled, and published. I would love to read comparable articles for other time spans.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: More Freight Car Content in March MRH

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I read it and enjoyed it. I just wish it had pointed out that it was focused on a peri-WWII or later fleet. For example, the signature Southern cars were the 1937 steel boxcar and an even later car. This might have the broadest appeal, given the numbers of transition modelers, but does me no good for my 1934 modeling effort. The aging, outdated wood 36' boxcars that was replaced mostly by those '37 cars were a signature car in the 20s and 30s!  And there is a great Westerfield kit as well as an F&C version to model it.  According to "Captain' Snow's conductor books, those SU truss rod cars were the staple for merchandise (i.e., LCL) on the Winston-Salem division at least.  In addition there were vents and DD DS cars in the fleet (which only has the rare Sunshine kit to represent it).

If that's what happened on the road I know well, then that leaves me in the dark for the roads I don't.

This isn't complaining about Tony's article, it's a request to expand the concept to cover other eras! Who can write the article for the Depression era, the WWI to Depression era, the turn-of-the-century, or even the 50s?

I'll work on 1934, but I could use some help.

Dave

Sent from Dave Bott's iPad

On Mar 3, 2015, at 5:16 PM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Tony T. has a long article w/many photos about Freight Cars in the March Model Railroad Hobbyist.


Bill Welch



Re: Mike's article

Tom Madden
 

Clark, you make that sound like a bad thing.


Tom Madden, Passenger Car List Owner


Re: WESTERFIELD MODELS NEWSLETTER, VOL 4, NO 1, MARCH 2015

Tim O'Connor
 


 > These are the early Harriman cars, with mildly fishbelly side sills of pressed steel,
 > classes F-50-1 to -3 ... What many SP and UP modelers have been clamoring for is the
 > straight-side-sill cars, F-50-4 and thereafter
 > Tony Thompson

Aaargh!! You are exactly right Tony. I hurrah'ed too soon without reading the fine print. Phooey on the fishbellies!!

Tim O'


Re: WESTERFIELD MODELS NEWSLETTER, VOL 4, NO 1, MARCH 2015

Tim O'Connor
 

Hear hear!!!! Hurray for Harriman flat cars!!!

Tim O'Connor

The Harriman flat cars will sell very well from all the expressions of interest from UP and ESPEE modelers.

gary laakso


More Freight Car Content in March MRH

Bill Welch
 

Tony T. has a long article w/many photos about Freight Cars in the March Model Railroad Hobbyist.


Bill Welch


Re: Photo-real modeling

Tim O'Connor
 

Schuyler

I can believe this. I remember seeing photos of an incredibly fine O scale
layout in Chicago in the 1930's and the models -- especially lettering -- was
as good as any I've seen in recent years. Now you've made me wonder if this
is exactly what they did to make those models!

John Nehrich at the RPI club has done numerous buildings on the layout using
photo-printed sides, and even close up (inches) with a high-megapixel digital
camera, you cannot tell they are printed. And because they are actual photo
prints, the realism leaves nothing to be desired.

Tim O'Connor

Probably my email friend Mike Bauers should do the real explanation, but I think I understand what he�s attempting to do.

Take photos of real steam era freight cars, photoshop them into orthogonal views, and print or laminate prints of them on cardstock. One could then assemble these prints into a box to make a box car, for instance, or glue them to a block of wood.

Now, before you guffaw, hold on a bit. I don�t have the time to search for it just now, but I recently was sent a link to a webpage full of models made from paper. The modeling was VERY impressive, and in some ways captured more of the reality of the prototypes than our resin friends can manage. Some were made with paper sides, but had ladders and door hardware applied, but some just had these parts �applied� with images.

I�ll be very interested to see what Mr Bauers comes up with. I expect he will rapidly adapt to our nomenclature (single sheathed vs �outside braced,� for example). And I know he�s an excellent modeler. Bring it on, Mike!

Schuyler


Re: Dubuque URTX refrigerator car

Tim O'Connor
 

Tom

I think that 63971 was a 37' wood sheathed reefer like the Rapido (and Sunshine) models
built by General American with an inside length of 29' and change. The 63xxx series was a
mixture of steel cars and wood cars of various lengths (36' 37' 40').

Whose kit is this? Red Caboose? Athearn? Atlas? Surely not Branchline?

Tim O'Connor

I have a kit for a 40' Dubuque URTX wood refrigerator car. Its number is 63971. These two factors raise suspicions that the sides have been silk-screened or pad printed inaccurately. First, I was not aware that Dubuque Packing leased wood cars that were 40'. Second, the number seems to be too high for a series of Dubuque leases of URTX wood cars. Well, the roof was metal, so that may make them composite cars, but the two points still raise doubts. Can anyone on the list enlighten me.

Tom Baker


Re: WESTERFIELD MODELS NEWSLETTER, VOL 4, NO 1, MARCH 2015

Tony Thompson
 

gary laakso wrote:

 
The Harriman flat cars will sell very well from all the expressions of interest from UP and ESPEE modelers.

      These are the early Harriman cars, with mildly fishbelly side sills of pressed steel, classes F-50-1 to -3. Though they lasted MANY years in MOW service, they were largely out of revenue service by World War II. What many SP and UP modelers have been clamoring for is the straight-side-sill cars, F-50-4 and thereafter, which were in revenue service well through the transition era. I believe those are also under study at Westerfield.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




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